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On this day …….. 19th of October 1946

A STARTLING STORY of the gold-rush days, and a woman’s resourcefulness, is told by a friend of mine about the new gold signet ring he wears. While his grandparents, then a young couple newly arrived from England, were on the Bendigo goldfields, his grandmother entered their tent after a short absence one night, just in time to see a knife slitting the canvas over the spot where her husband had hidden a sizeable sum in nuggets. As a hand appeared through the slit she grabbed the handiest weapon in sight, a carving knife lying on the table. An agonised oath from the marauder accompanied the split-second withdrawal of the hand, minus- the greater part of two fingers – one of which wore a heavy gold Signet ring – Haddon Morrison, Ascotvale.

 

On This Day ……. 16th May 1860

One of the larger than life characters of the early gold rush in North East Victoria was locked up in the Beechworth Gaol on this day in 1860. Doctor Radley had been practising in Chiltern, where there was some doubt about him being qualified doctor. Popular opinion was that he was an aristocrat named Jowitt, in hiding from some overseas scandal. He was certainly a man of considerable talent. During his time in Beechworth Gaol awaiting trail for manslaughter, (for a treatment that didn’t work out), he helped the inmates of the gaol prepare briefs for their trials. He was later tried in Melbourne, and then turned up in Sydney conducting a radical newspaper, exposing the alleged mis-deeds of Sydney society.

On This Day……… 1st April 1860

Celebrating ancient festivals came easily to new gold rush settlements. Chiltern in North East Victoria, was only a few months old when April Fools Day came around in 1860, but did they forget their ancient customs? Unfortunate doctors and lawyers, whose sleep was disturbed by midnight calls to attend imaginary emergencies, and to take death – bed wills at 3am from soundly sleeping men in robust health, would mutter an emphatic “no”. According to the Chiltern Standard, half the towns business and professional people were got out of bed under one pretext or another.

 

 

On this day …….. 19th of October 1946

A STARTLING STORY of the gold-rush days, and a woman’s resourcefulness, is told by a friend of mine about the new gold signet ring he wears. While his grandparents, then a young couple newly arrived from England, were on the Bendigo goldfields, his grandmother entered their tent after a short absence one night, just in time to see a knife slitting the canvas over the spot where her husband had hidden a sizeable sum in nuggets. As a hand appeared through the slit she grabbed the handiest weapon in sight, a carving knife lying on the table. An agonised oath from the marauder accompanied the split-second withdrawal of the hand, minus- the greater part of two fingers – one of which wore a heavy gold Signet ring – Haddon Morrison, Ascotvale.

 

On This Day ……. 16th May 1860

One of the larger than life characters of the early gold rush in North East Victoria was locked up in the Beechworth Gaol on this day in 1860. Doctor Radley had been practising in Chiltern, where there was some doubt about him being qualified doctor. Popular opinion was that he was an aristocrat named Jowitt, in hiding from some overseas scandal. He was certainly a man of considerable talent. During his time in Beechworth Gaol awaiting trail for manslaughter, (for a treatment that didn’t work out), he helped the inmates of the gaol prepare briefs for their trials. He was later tried in Melbourne, and then turned up in Sydney conducting a radical newspaper, exposing the alleged mis-deeds of Sydney society.

On This Day……… 1st April 1860

Celebrating ancient festivals came easily to new gold rush settlements. Chiltern in North East Victoria, was only a few months old when April Fools Day came around in 1860, but did they forget their ancient customs? Unfortunate doctors and lawyers, whose sleep was disturbed by midnight calls to attend imaginary emergencies, and to take death – bed wills at 3am from soundly sleeping men in robust health, would mutter an emphatic “no”. According to the Chiltern Standard, half the towns business and professional people were got out of bed under one pretext or another.