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On this day …….. 4th of June 1891

Moyhu in North East Victoria, revived an unexpected visitor from old time Bushranger Harry Power on this day. Power had been released from Pentridge Gaol due to ill health and was ready for a career in show bussiness. An old convict ship had been refitted to show what life was like on one of the old prison hulk on Port Phillip Bay. Harry was the official greeter of guests and was billed as “a real bushranger”. Harry had returned to Moyhu, he said to search for a plant of gold he had made some years earlier. He disappeared from the district, and reappeared in Swan Hill, where he died latter that year. Harry is buried in the Swan Hill cemetery.

ON THIS DAY…… 9th November 1859

Free falling

On this day in 1859, a miner on the lower Indigo Goldfields in North East Victoria, fell two hundreds and thirty feet down a mine and lived. No broken bones, just a few bruises. It was possibly the longest free fall followed by survival. The lucky miner, James Clements, fell into the well hole at the bottom of the shaft, where the water broke his fall. No explanation can be offered for his miraculous escape, except to reiterate that Cornish miners were traditionally small people, and James was Cornish.

On this day …….. 31st of October 1923

Marble Bar is a tiny town in the Pilbara region of north-western Western Australia. The discovery of gold in 1890 by Francis Jenkins led to the establishment of a town, which was officially gazetted in 1893. The town derives its name from a nearby jasper formation which was mistaken by early settlers for a bar of marble. This rock formation is also known as the Marble Bar, and the nearby Marble Bar Pool is a popular picnic and swimming area for both tourists and the people of the township. During the goldrushes, Marble Bar had over 5000 residents, but its population now is closer to 400. It is still a productive area, being mined for gold, tin, silver, lead, zinc, copper and jade deposits. Known for its excessive temperatures, Marble Bar achieved a new heat record in 1923-24. Beginning on 31 October 1923, the town experienced a heatwave which continued for 160 consecutive days, where the maximum temperature was 37.8 degrees Celsius (100 degrees Fahrenheit) or higher. The last day of the heatwave was 7 April 1924.

 

On this day …….. 4th of June 1891

Moyhu in North East Victoria, revived an unexpected visitor from old time Bushranger Harry Power on this day. Power had been released from Pentridge Gaol due to ill health and was ready for a career in show bussiness. An old convict ship had been refitted to show what life was like on one of the old prison hulk on Port Phillip Bay. Harry was the official greeter of guests and was billed as “a real bushranger”. Harry had returned to Moyhu, he said to search for a plant of gold he had made some years earlier. He disappeared from the district, and reappeared in Swan Hill, where he died latter that year. Harry is buried in the Swan Hill cemetery.

On This Day……… 10th April 1894

An accident at Wangaratta railway station on this day in 1894, brought to the end one young man’s dreams of making his fortune in the golden west. It was the time of the gold discoveries at Coolgardie WA, and a young man had boarded the train at Wodonga, to join a partner already in Melbourne, before taking a boat to Western Australia. At the Wangaratta station, the young man got off the train and fell into the ash put. As he climbed out of the pit, he was hit by the Beechworth Train. At first, it was thought his name was Martin Walsh from Allens Flat, the name on the suitcase he carried. Further investigations revealed that he was William Clapton Handley, 26 and a carpenter by trade. At the inquest it was found that if the stations had been better light, the accident may not have happened.

 

 

On this day ………… 12th February 1851

Gold was first officially discovered in Australia on 12 February 1851, not far from Bathurst, New South Wales. Edward Hammond Hargraves had carefully studied the geology of the area and, convinced that it was similar to that of the California goldfields, from where he had just returned, went prospecting. He enlisted the assistance of John Lister, a man who had already found gold in the region. Of particular note was the use of the cradle, or rocker, a technology which Hargraves had brought back from California. This device allowed prospectors to search a greater volume of soil at any given time. Lister, accompanied by William Tom and his brother James, found four ounces of gold using the cradle. They led Hargraves to the location at Summerhill Creek, at a site which Hargraves named “Ophir” after the Biblical city of gold. After reporting his discovery, he was appointed a ‘Commissioner of Land’, receiving a reward of £10,000 plus a life pension. The New South Wales government made the official announcement of the discovery of gold in May 1851. Lister and the Tom brothers, however, were not given any credit or reward for their part in the discovery.

 

 

On this day ………… 5th February 1869

The world’s largest recorded gold nugget is the “Welcome Stranger”, found in Australia on 5 February 1869. The Welcome Stranger measured 61cm by 31cm and was discovered by prospectors John Deason and Richard Oates at Moliagul, about half-way between Maryborough and St Arnaud in western Victoria, Australia. No scales of the time could handle the weight of the nugget, so it was broken into three pieces by a blacksmith in order to be weighed: it weighed in at over 2300 ounces, or 70 kilograms. Deason (Deeson) and Oates were paid £19,068 for their nugget which became known as “Welcome Stranger”. It is not the same as the “Welcome Nugget” found in Ballarat in 1858.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – January 6, 1859

Mr Cornelius Green, commission agent of Bruthen and Omeo, was shot by bushrangers whilst on his way from Omeo with gold on this day in 1859, Mr Green left Swift’s Creek in company with a mounted trooper and Mr Thomas Jenkins. His gold supposed to be about 1000 ounces was secured on a packhorse. A short distance from Swift’s Creek the party were fired upon by bushrangers. Mr Green was shot dead, and Mr Jenkins severely wounded and the mounted constable had his arm broken when shot. Cornelius Green is buried in the Omeo, and a stone monument marks the location of the attack at Swifts Creek.

 

ON THIS DAY…… 9th November 1859

Free falling

On this day in 1859, a miner on the lower Indigo Goldfields in North East Victoria, fell two hundreds and thirty feet down a mine and lived. No broken bones, just a few bruises. It was possibly the longest free fall followed by survival. The lucky miner, James Clements, fell into the well hole at the bottom of the shaft, where the water broke his fall. No explanation can be offered for his miraculous escape, except to reiterate that Cornish miners were traditionally small people, and James was Cornish.

On this day …….. 31st of October 1923

Marble Bar is a tiny town in the Pilbara region of north-western Western Australia. The discovery of gold in 1890 by Francis Jenkins led to the establishment of a town, which was officially gazetted in 1893. The town derives its name from a nearby jasper formation which was mistaken by early settlers for a bar of marble. This rock formation is also known as the Marble Bar, and the nearby Marble Bar Pool is a popular picnic and swimming area for both tourists and the people of the township. During the goldrushes, Marble Bar had over 5000 residents, but its population now is closer to 400. It is still a productive area, being mined for gold, tin, silver, lead, zinc, copper and jade deposits. Known for its excessive temperatures, Marble Bar achieved a new heat record in 1923-24. Beginning on 31 October 1923, the town experienced a heatwave which continued for 160 consecutive days, where the maximum temperature was 37.8 degrees Celsius (100 degrees Fahrenheit) or higher. The last day of the heatwave was 7 April 1924.

 

On this day …….. 4th of June 1891

Moyhu in North East Victoria, revived an unexpected visitor from old time Bushranger Harry Power on this day. Power had been released from Pentridge Gaol due to ill health and was ready for a career in show bussiness. An old convict ship had been refitted to show what life was like on one of the old prison hulk on Port Phillip Bay. Harry was the official greeter of guests and was billed as “a real bushranger”. Harry had returned to Moyhu, he said to search for a plant of gold he had made some years earlier. He disappeared from the district, and reappeared in Swan Hill, where he died latter that year. Harry is buried in the Swan Hill cemetery.

On This Day……… 10th April 1894

An accident at Wangaratta railway station on this day in 1894, brought to the end one young man’s dreams of making his fortune in the golden west. It was the time of the gold discoveries at Coolgardie WA, and a young man had boarded the train at Wodonga, to join a partner already in Melbourne, before taking a boat to Western Australia. At the Wangaratta station, the young man got off the train and fell into the ash put. As he climbed out of the pit, he was hit by the Beechworth Train. At first, it was thought his name was Martin Walsh from Allens Flat, the name on the suitcase he carried. Further investigations revealed that he was William Clapton Handley, 26 and a carpenter by trade. At the inquest it was found that if the stations had been better light, the accident may not have happened.