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On this day …….. 25th April 1809

Australia’s first postmaster was Isaac Nichols. Nichols had arrived with the Second Fleet on the Admiral Barrington in October 1791 after being found guilty of stealing and sentenced to seven years transportation. However, he was found to be a diligent worker, greatly trusted by Governor Hunter. Although accused of receiving stolen goods in New South Wales in 1799, his innocence was upheld by Hunter, who believed evidence had been planted against him. He ordered the suspension of Nichols’s fourteen-year sentence, but it was not until Philip Gidley King’s government that Nichols was awarded a free pardon, in January 1802. An enterprising man, he bought several properties and even established a shipyard, becoming quite prosperous. In 1809, Nichols was first appointed superintendent of public works and assistant to the Naval Officer. One month later, the same month that Governor Macquarie arrived in New South Wales, Nichols was appointed the colony’s first postmaster on 25 April 1809. Nichol retained this position until he died in 1819.

 

On this day ……. 9th April 1865

John Fuller aka Daniel Morgan aka Mad Dog Morgan was born in 1830 and was killed by police on this day in 1865. He was an Australian bushranger from North East Victoria and Southern NSW. After he killed a trooper in July 1864, the Government put a £1,000 bounty on his head. He was shot and killed after holding up the McPherson family at Peechelba Station the day before in Victoria.

 

On This Day – 5th March 1854

A sad case of the death of a Lunatic at the Geelong gaol on this day in 1854. The body of a deceased lunatic, Ann Connelly, shows how horribly the authorities neglect to provide for the wants of the community. By the evidence there given, we find the unfortunates incarcerated within the gaol walls are treated more like brutes than rational beings, and, to use the words of the gaoler himself, “the present system is quite subversive of prison discipline.” When will the Government listen to the voice of reason? An inquest was held the following day.

 

 

On this day …….. 25th April 1809

Australia’s first postmaster was Isaac Nichols. Nichols had arrived with the Second Fleet on the Admiral Barrington in October 1791 after being found guilty of stealing and sentenced to seven years transportation. However, he was found to be a diligent worker, greatly trusted by Governor Hunter. Although accused of receiving stolen goods in New South Wales in 1799, his innocence was upheld by Hunter, who believed evidence had been planted against him. He ordered the suspension of Nichols’s fourteen-year sentence, but it was not until Philip Gidley King’s government that Nichols was awarded a free pardon, in January 1802. An enterprising man, he bought several properties and even established a shipyard, becoming quite prosperous. In 1809, Nichols was first appointed superintendent of public works and assistant to the Naval Officer. One month later, the same month that Governor Macquarie arrived in New South Wales, Nichols was appointed the colony’s first postmaster on 25 April 1809. Nichol retained this position until he died in 1819.

 

On this day ……. 9th April 1865

John Fuller aka Daniel Morgan aka Mad Dog Morgan was born in 1830 and was killed by police on this day in 1865. He was an Australian bushranger from North East Victoria and Southern NSW. After he killed a trooper in July 1864, the Government put a £1,000 bounty on his head. He was shot and killed after holding up the McPherson family at Peechelba Station the day before in Victoria.

 

On This Day – 5th March 1854

A sad case of the death of a Lunatic at the Geelong gaol on this day in 1854. The body of a deceased lunatic, Ann Connelly, shows how horribly the authorities neglect to provide for the wants of the community. By the evidence there given, we find the unfortunates incarcerated within the gaol walls are treated more like brutes than rational beings, and, to use the words of the gaoler himself, “the present system is quite subversive of prison discipline.” When will the Government listen to the voice of reason? An inquest was held the following day.

 

 

In 1876 the Victorian State Government decided it would abolish toll gates by 1877. It promised local councils to compensate them for any lost income. Unfortunately in 1877 the State Government found itself without funds and the towns of Northcote and Preston faced an uncertain future. Fortunately as the Council began to panic the State Government was able to raise sufficient cash to bail it out of its difficulties.

One toll house managed, despite everything to survive until the 1980s. The Northcote Council fought hard to save the building but it was demolished anyway.