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On this day …….. 28th May 1814

Unlike in the penal colony of New South Wales, Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) remained largely a convict settlement for its first fifty years. Little was done to encourage free settlers to take up land on the island. The colony faced starvation in the first few years of its existence, so Governor of Tasmania, Colonel Collins, was forced to send out the convicts to hunt. Lured by their unexpected freedom and undaunted by their isolation from the mainland, many convicts chose not to return, but undertook a life of bushranging. Bushranging soon reached epidemic proportions, and in May 1813, Lieutenant Governor Davey demanded all absconded convicts and bushrangers return by December, or face being shot on sight after that date. Concerned by the ramifications of the subsequent outrage, on 28 May 1814 the Governor of New South Wales, Lachlan Macquarie, offered a pardon to all convicts except for those who had been convicted of murder, if they surrendered within six months. Taking the proclamation as a licence to bushrange, many convicts continued their crimes until the last moment. True to his word, Macquarie pardoned them of all previous crimes, whereupon many of them promptly returned to bushranging.

On this day …….. 13th of April 1839

The first tourist to the North East Victoria, Lady Franklin, the wife of the Governor of Tasmania, found few comforts. Her party slept under bark and canvis tents and travelled by horse and cart. Lady Franklins and her small party arrived in Violet Town on this day in 1839, en route to Sydney. The creek at Violet Town had been names three years earlier by Major Mitchell.

first tourist, North East Victoria, Governor of Tasmania, Lady Franklins, Sydney, Violet Town, Major Mitchell.

On this day …….. 28th May 1814

Unlike in the penal colony of New South Wales, Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) remained largely a convict settlement for its first fifty years. Little was done to encourage free settlers to take up land on the island. The colony faced starvation in the first few years of its existence, so Governor of Tasmania, Colonel Collins, was forced to send out the convicts to hunt. Lured by their unexpected freedom and undaunted by their isolation from the mainland, many convicts chose not to return, but undertook a life of bushranging. Bushranging soon reached epidemic proportions, and in May 1813, Lieutenant Governor Davey demanded all absconded convicts and bushrangers return by December, or face being shot on sight after that date. Concerned by the ramifications of the subsequent outrage, on 28 May 1814 the Governor of New South Wales, Lachlan Macquarie, offered a pardon to all convicts except for those who had been convicted of murder, if they surrendered within six months. Taking the proclamation as a licence to bushrange, many convicts continued their crimes until the last moment. True to his word, Macquarie pardoned them of all previous crimes, whereupon many of them promptly returned to bushranging.

On this day …….. 13th of April 1839

The first tourist to the North East Victoria, Lady Franklin, the wife of the Governor of Tasmania, found few comforts. Her party slept under bark and canvis tents and travelled by horse and cart. Lady Franklins and her small party arrived in Violet Town on this day in 1839, en route to Sydney. The creek at Violet Town had been names three years earlier by Major Mitchell.

first tourist, North East Victoria, Governor of Tasmania, Lady Franklins, Sydney, Violet Town, Major Mitchell.