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On This Day – November 27, 1890

A revolting murder is reported as having occurred at Mount Riddle, three miles from Healesville, where the naked trunk of a man has been discovered, slightly covered with earth and boughs. It was found beside the bank forming a waterhole in a paddock belonging to Mr. Steel, J.P. The body was terribly mutilated, as if with a tomahawk. The severed limbs were found under a hut about 300 yards from the body, which is supposed to be that of an Indian hawker. From appearance the body had been dead about a week. The Government have offered £50 reward for the arrest of the Hindu hawker named Fatta Chand, who is suspected of the murder of a fellow country man named Mull at Healesville. On the 30th of November Fatta Chand was arrested eighteen miles from Geelong while having tea. He had proceeded by steamer from Melbourne to Geelong, evidently to make his way up country.

ON THIS DAY – November 15, 1891

This afternoon Mr Justice Moleworth was occupied in the Criminal Court in hearing the charge of murder against Fatta Chand, the Indian hawker, whose mate, Juggo Mull, was found foully murdered at Steel’s paddocks, near Healesville, on November 15, last.

 

 

 

EXECUTED THIS DAY – April 27, 1891

 

On this day in 1891, the execution of Fatta Chand took place for murdering his Hindoo partner, Juggo Mull, near Healesville in November last, took place within the Melbourne gaol. The condemned man on finding he could not accomplish his purpose of cheating the gallows by starving himself, partook of food voluntarily. Mr Gilbert Smith, interpreter, states that when he saw Chand he was perfectly resigned to his fate, and said in his native tongue “I will go to the scaffold like a man and not like a woman.” There was an unusual number of spectators at the execution, including 30 policemen, private individuals and representatives of the press. Shortly before ten o’clock the sheriff demanded Fatta Chand’s body from the governor of the goal in the usual manner, and the condemned man, who looked lank and lean, on being bound, marched on to the scaffold with firm step. The governor of the gaol asked him if he had anything to say, whereupon he replied through an interpreter “No I have nothing more to say. I did not kill the man. I am not guilty. I am not guilty.” The cap was then drawn down, the rope adjusted and the bolt drawn, death being instantaneous. It was feared that Chand’s reduced weight would not have broken his neck. None of his countrymen were present at the carrying out of the sentence. Before Fatta Chand was taken to the gallows he told Mr Smith, intetpreter, that after death he would become a wanderer on earth. He requested that his parents be informed that he died from cholera, and that his body had been burned.

 

ON THIS DAY …….. 1st April 1901

HEALESVILLE

Catherine and Hester Brown, mother and daughter, were charged with the murder of a newly-born male child on this day in 1901, at Healesville. Hester Brown, in a statement made to the police, and which was read in court, admitted having given birth to an illegitimate male child on the same day. She saw the child after birth on the bed, and then fainted. On returning to consciousness she heard the infant breathing hard. Then she fell asleep. She was afterwards informed by her mother that the baby was dead, and that she and her mother had smothered and buried it. She knew where the child was buried, and so did her daughter Emma. She further said she had wished the infant to live, and that it was not her fault that it was not alive now. The jury found that the accused were guilty of concealment of birth.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – February 20, 1891

NARBETHONG

The shocking and mysterious murders which were committed at Narbethong on the night of the 20th of February formed the subject of an investigation by the district coroner and a jury of seven at Healesville. The murdered persons were William Davis, an old settler of the Healesville district and his wife. The body of the former was found on the roadside half a mile from his house and that of the latter in bed in the house. Both had their heads terribly battered and their throats cut. As the bodies were found in different localities, it is necessary that two inquests shall be held. Thirty witnesses were examined. The evidence tended to clear up a good many circumstances on which erroneous theories accounting for the murders have been founded, and some new facts were revealed, which tend to inculpate more than ever the carpenter William Colston, who disappeared so suddenly and unaccountably on the day that the murders were discovered. Colston bore such a good reputation in the district that until he was found to he missing no one thought of suspecting him. He had made arrangements to go on the day following the murders to Healesville, and he had mentioned to several persons that it was his intention to proceed to Mildura, but instead of doing so he went to Marysville, leaving his personal belongings behind him at Narbethong, and made his way into the bush. Strangely enough his disappearance became known through his services being required to construct coffins for the murdered people.

On This Day – November 27, 1890

A revolting murder is reported as having occurred at Mount Riddle, three miles from Healesville, where the naked trunk of a man has been discovered, slightly covered with earth and boughs. It was found beside the bank forming a waterhole in a paddock belonging to Mr. Steel, J.P. The body was terribly mutilated, as if with a tomahawk. The severed limbs were found under a hut about 300 yards from the body, which is supposed to be that of an Indian hawker. From appearance the body had been dead about a week. The Government have offered £50 reward for the arrest of the Hindu hawker named Fatta Chand, who is suspected of the murder of a fellow country man named Mull at Healesville. On the 30th of November Fatta Chand was arrested eighteen miles from Geelong while having tea. He had proceeded by steamer from Melbourne to Geelong, evidently to make his way up country.

ON THIS DAY – November 15, 1891

This afternoon Mr Justice Moleworth was occupied in the Criminal Court in hearing the charge of murder against Fatta Chand, the Indian hawker, whose mate, Juggo Mull, was found foully murdered at Steel’s paddocks, near Healesville, on November 15, last.

 

 

 

EXECUTED THIS DAY – April 27, 1891

 

On this day in 1891, the execution of Fatta Chand took place for murdering his Hindoo partner, Juggo Mull, near Healesville in November last, took place within the Melbourne gaol. The condemned man on finding he could not accomplish his purpose of cheating the gallows by starving himself, partook of food voluntarily. Mr Gilbert Smith, interpreter, states that when he saw Chand he was perfectly resigned to his fate, and said in his native tongue “I will go to the scaffold like a man and not like a woman.” There was an unusual number of spectators at the execution, including 30 policemen, private individuals and representatives of the press. Shortly before ten o’clock the sheriff demanded Fatta Chand’s body from the governor of the goal in the usual manner, and the condemned man, who looked lank and lean, on being bound, marched on to the scaffold with firm step. The governor of the gaol asked him if he had anything to say, whereupon he replied through an interpreter “No I have nothing more to say. I did not kill the man. I am not guilty. I am not guilty.” The cap was then drawn down, the rope adjusted and the bolt drawn, death being instantaneous. It was feared that Chand’s reduced weight would not have broken his neck. None of his countrymen were present at the carrying out of the sentence. Before Fatta Chand was taken to the gallows he told Mr Smith, intetpreter, that after death he would become a wanderer on earth. He requested that his parents be informed that he died from cholera, and that his body had been burned.

 

ON THIS DAY …….. 1st April 1901

HEALESVILLE

Catherine and Hester Brown, mother and daughter, were charged with the murder of a newly-born male child on this day in 1901, at Healesville. Hester Brown, in a statement made to the police, and which was read in court, admitted having given birth to an illegitimate male child on the same day. She saw the child after birth on the bed, and then fainted. On returning to consciousness she heard the infant breathing hard. Then she fell asleep. She was afterwards informed by her mother that the baby was dead, and that she and her mother had smothered and buried it. She knew where the child was buried, and so did her daughter Emma. She further said she had wished the infant to live, and that it was not her fault that it was not alive now. The jury found that the accused were guilty of concealment of birth.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – February 20, 1891

NARBETHONG

The shocking and mysterious murders which were committed at Narbethong on the night of the 20th of February formed the subject of an investigation by the district coroner and a jury of seven at Healesville. The murdered persons were William Davis, an old settler of the Healesville district and his wife. The body of the former was found on the roadside half a mile from his house and that of the latter in bed in the house. Both had their heads terribly battered and their throats cut. As the bodies were found in different localities, it is necessary that two inquests shall be held. Thirty witnesses were examined. The evidence tended to clear up a good many circumstances on which erroneous theories accounting for the murders have been founded, and some new facts were revealed, which tend to inculpate more than ever the carpenter William Colston, who disappeared so suddenly and unaccountably on the day that the murders were discovered. Colston bore such a good reputation in the district that until he was found to he missing no one thought of suspecting him. He had made arrangements to go on the day following the murders to Healesville, and he had mentioned to several persons that it was his intention to proceed to Mildura, but instead of doing so he went to Marysville, leaving his personal belongings behind him at Narbethong, and made his way into the bush. Strangely enough his disappearance became known through his services being required to construct coffins for the murdered people.

Death Mask of Fatta Chand

Death Mask of Fatta Chand

MOUNT RIDDLE

HORRIBLE MURDER.

A revolting murder is reported as having occurred at Mount Riddle, three miles from Healesville, where the naked trunk of a man has been discovered, slightly covered with earth and boughs. It was found beside the bank forming a waterhole in a paddock belonging to Mr. Steel, J.P. The body was terribly mutilated, as if with a tomahawk. The severed limbs were found under a hut about 300 yards from the body, which is supposed to be that of an Indian hawker. From appearance the body had been dead about a week. The Government have offered £50 reward for the arrest of the Hindu hawker named Fatta Chand, who is suspected of the murder of a fellow country man named Mull at Healesville. On the 30th of November Fatta Chand was arrested eighteen miles from Geelong while having tea. He had proceeded by steamer from Melbourne to Geelong, evidently to make his way up country.