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On this day ……… 30th of May 1953 

Homicide squad detectives investigating the Mildura “Pyjama Man” murder have taken possession of a 12in. iron bar. Senior-detective N. Wilby and Detective E. Miller found the bar when they went to Mildura to investigate fresh reports by local police. The bar will be examined by police scientific experts in Melbourne later this week. An aborigine told police he saw a man hide the bar in bushes a few weeks, after the murder of Milan Hlavenka, 32, Czechoslovakian student. Hlavenka was battered to death and robbed of £8/8/ while he slept, dressed in pyjamas, in a sleeping bag on the banks of the Murray near Mildura on May 30. Detectives Wilby and Miller interviewed several aborigines at the weekend.

 

60 years of Australian TV

Homicide premiered on the 20th of October 1964 and ran till 1977. The show was an Australian television police procedural drama series made by production firm Crawford Productions for the Seven Network. It was the television successor to Crawfords’ radio series D24. The series dealt with the homicide squad of the Victorian Police force and the various crimes and cases the detectives are called upon to investigate. Many episodes were based directly on real cases, although the characters (including the detectives) were fictional. 510 episodes were produced, and aired from October 1964 to January 1977. It remains as the longest-running Australian drama series to date. The police station was filmed at the Russell St Police HQ 336/376 Russell St, Melbourne.

On this day ……… 30th of May 1953 

Homicide squad detectives investigating the Mildura “Pyjama Man” murder have taken possession of a 12in. iron bar. Senior-detective N. Wilby and Detective E. Miller found the bar when they went to Mildura to investigate fresh reports by local police. The bar will be examined by police scientific experts in Melbourne later this week. An aborigine told police he saw a man hide the bar in bushes a few weeks, after the murder of Milan Hlavenka, 32, Czechoslovakian student. Hlavenka was battered to death and robbed of £8/8/ while he slept, dressed in pyjamas, in a sleeping bag on the banks of the Murray near Mildura on May 30. Detectives Wilby and Miller interviewed several aborigines at the weekend.

 

ON THIS DAY – FEBRUARY 27, 2011

Former South Australian horse trainer Les Samba was shot dead in what appears to be a targeted attack, on this day in 2011. The 60-year-old was shot about 9.40pm on Beaconsfield Parade, in the suburb of Middle Park, after an argument with another man. Detective Inspector John Potter from the Homicide Squad says police believed Mr Samba had parked and locked his car, a 2010 silver Hyundai sedan, and set off to attend a meeting. He was seen running down Beaconsfield Parade near his car as he was shot several times in the body and head. Mr Samba was in Melbourne for the thoroughbred yearling sales. While he trained many winners, Samba, who lived in Sydney, also enjoyed much success as an owner. He raced Gorky Park, which won the Geelong Classic and ran second behind Efficient in the 2006 Victoria Derby.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – FEBRUARY 21, 2002

Former jeweller Slawomir Tomczyk had been desperate to find another job since joining a security firm in the outer eastern suburbs four months earlier. Tomczyk was murdered as he completed his nightly rounds of business premises on this day in 2002. His body was found in the grounds of the Casablanca Reception Centre in Cranbourne at 2am by his boss, Sandy Sempel, who became concerned when Mr Tomczyk failed to check in at midnight. “It is shocking. You never want to find your workmates like this. He was a reliable worker. Who expects to go to work and get killed?” Mr Sempel said. Tomczyk was ambushed at the front of the premises, dragged down a side driveway and left to die. Police were shocked at the brutality of the murder and believe the killers attacked the 44-year-old Polish immigrant some time after 10pm and were not trying to break into the reception centre. “He’s like anyone else, he’s out there earning a living, he’s trying to protect the community,” said Detective Senior Sergeant Ron Iddles of the homicide squad. “He’s unarmed and it’s been a very, very vicious attack, cold, calculating and very cruel.” Tomczyk’s car was found a short time later in nearby Clyde North, on Thompson’s Road near the intersection of Berwick-Cranbourne Road. Tomczyk took the security job to support himself and his elderly mother after being retrenched from his job as a jeweller in Endeavour Hills. His neighbours in Berwick said he did not like security work, and had been looking for another job. “He was a very gentle sort of a guy. He didn’t like the hours, and wasn’t really all that cut out for it,” said Victoria Poulos, who lives next to the Tomczyk home. “He was friendly to everyone and seemed to enjoy life. He used to like playing ABBA records and having friends over.” Tomczyk’s mother arrived in Australia from Poland at Christmas to visit her son.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – February 16, 1969

BROOKLYN

A 27-year-old Scottish migrant appeared in the City Court charged with the murder of a girl aged 17 at Brooklyn on this day in 1969. George Lindsay Banner, plant operator, of Chirnside Street, West Footscray, was charged with the murder of Josephine Currie, of Bellair Street, Kensington. Det-First Constable N. J. Mclntyre. of the homicide squad, told Mr J. Moloney, SM, that Miss Currie was at a party in a West Brunswick flat on the fateful night. He said it was alleged that Banner offered to drive her home but instead drove to Brooklyn where he strangled her. Banner had subsequently taken police to a remote area near Frankston where he had taken the body and covered it. Banner had come from Scotland 10 years ago. He was living with his parents, having separated from his wife who was caring for his young daughter.

 

60 years of Australian TV

Homicide premiered on the 20th of October 1964 and ran till 1977. The show was an Australian television police procedural drama series made by production firm Crawford Productions for the Seven Network. It was the television successor to Crawfords’ radio series D24. The series dealt with the homicide squad of the Victorian Police force and the various crimes and cases the detectives are called upon to investigate. Many episodes were based directly on real cases, although the characters (including the detectives) were fictional. 510 episodes were produced, and aired from October 1964 to January 1977. It remains as the longest-running Australian drama series to date. The police station was filmed at the Russell St Police HQ 336/376 Russell St, Melbourne.

On this day ……… 30th of May 1953 

Homicide squad detectives investigating the Mildura “Pyjama Man” murder have taken possession of a 12in. iron bar. Senior-detective N. Wilby and Detective E. Miller found the bar when they went to Mildura to investigate fresh reports by local police. The bar will be examined by police scientific experts in Melbourne later this week. An aborigine told police he saw a man hide the bar in bushes a few weeks, after the murder of Milan Hlavenka, 32, Czechoslovakian student. Hlavenka was battered to death and robbed of £8/8/ while he slept, dressed in pyjamas, in a sleeping bag on the banks of the Murray near Mildura on May 30. Detectives Wilby and Miller interviewed several aborigines at the weekend.

 

ON THIS DAY – FEBRUARY 27, 2011

Former South Australian horse trainer Les Samba was shot dead in what appears to be a targeted attack, on this day in 2011. The 60-year-old was shot about 9.40pm on Beaconsfield Parade, in the suburb of Middle Park, after an argument with another man. Detective Inspector John Potter from the Homicide Squad says police believed Mr Samba had parked and locked his car, a 2010 silver Hyundai sedan, and set off to attend a meeting. He was seen running down Beaconsfield Parade near his car as he was shot several times in the body and head. Mr Samba was in Melbourne for the thoroughbred yearling sales. While he trained many winners, Samba, who lived in Sydney, also enjoyed much success as an owner. He raced Gorky Park, which won the Geelong Classic and ran second behind Efficient in the 2006 Victoria Derby.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – FEBRUARY 21, 2002

Former jeweller Slawomir Tomczyk had been desperate to find another job since joining a security firm in the outer eastern suburbs four months earlier. Tomczyk was murdered as he completed his nightly rounds of business premises on this day in 2002. His body was found in the grounds of the Casablanca Reception Centre in Cranbourne at 2am by his boss, Sandy Sempel, who became concerned when Mr Tomczyk failed to check in at midnight. “It is shocking. You never want to find your workmates like this. He was a reliable worker. Who expects to go to work and get killed?” Mr Sempel said. Tomczyk was ambushed at the front of the premises, dragged down a side driveway and left to die. Police were shocked at the brutality of the murder and believe the killers attacked the 44-year-old Polish immigrant some time after 10pm and were not trying to break into the reception centre. “He’s like anyone else, he’s out there earning a living, he’s trying to protect the community,” said Detective Senior Sergeant Ron Iddles of the homicide squad. “He’s unarmed and it’s been a very, very vicious attack, cold, calculating and very cruel.” Tomczyk’s car was found a short time later in nearby Clyde North, on Thompson’s Road near the intersection of Berwick-Cranbourne Road. Tomczyk took the security job to support himself and his elderly mother after being retrenched from his job as a jeweller in Endeavour Hills. His neighbours in Berwick said he did not like security work, and had been looking for another job. “He was a very gentle sort of a guy. He didn’t like the hours, and wasn’t really all that cut out for it,” said Victoria Poulos, who lives next to the Tomczyk home. “He was friendly to everyone and seemed to enjoy life. He used to like playing ABBA records and having friends over.” Tomczyk’s mother arrived in Australia from Poland at Christmas to visit her son.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – February 16, 1969

BROOKLYN

A 27-year-old Scottish migrant appeared in the City Court charged with the murder of a girl aged 17 at Brooklyn on this day in 1969. George Lindsay Banner, plant operator, of Chirnside Street, West Footscray, was charged with the murder of Josephine Currie, of Bellair Street, Kensington. Det-First Constable N. J. Mclntyre. of the homicide squad, told Mr J. Moloney, SM, that Miss Currie was at a party in a West Brunswick flat on the fateful night. He said it was alleged that Banner offered to drive her home but instead drove to Brooklyn where he strangled her. Banner had subsequently taken police to a remote area near Frankston where he had taken the body and covered it. Banner had come from Scotland 10 years ago. He was living with his parents, having separated from his wife who was caring for his young daughter.