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According to statistics from the Victorian Injury Surveillance Unit, 28,128 Victorians were injured by animals between July 2004 and June 2007, that is nearly 10 000 a year. But to break that down, almost 7700 Victorians have been taken to hospital during this time after being attacked by dogs. Horses were second on the list, killing two people and injuring a further 5628. Mosquito killed two people and sent 256 more to hospital. 9922 Victorians were hurt by creepy-crawlies, including spiders, bees, wasps, ticks, ants, centipedes and even scorpions. More unusual statistics were that close to 50 Victorians were attacked by monkeys. Family pets such as cats, rabbits and guinea pigs injured 1117 people, and 450 people ended up at a hospital with insects stuck in eyes, nose or ears. Chickens injured 92 people, and stingrays over 50 people. Six people had to be treated after encountering ducks and alpacas. Wombats, kangaroos, wallabies, possums and dingoes were responsible for attacks on 231 people. And 1153 Victorians were attacked in their sleep or while resting or eating.

 

On This Day ……. 6th June 2013

A number of circus animals have been recaptured after breaking loose in the middle of Broome. Cows, camels, llamas, horses and donkeys escaped from their temporary enclosure on Male Oval this morning after a fence post came loose. It took Circus Royale staff about 10 minutes to round up the animals as onlookers watched in amusement. Circus Royale spokesman Daman Syred says the animals may have been trying to take advantage of Broome’s wet weather. “We had a cow and a few of our horses decided to go for a run through some of the puddles that have formed here on the grounds in Broome, so yeah they had a bit of a run around on the oval,” he said.

 

On This Day – April 8, 1909

A boy named Sydney Reynolds, nine years of age, son of the stationmaster at West Footscray, met with a remarkable accident yesterday evening.

At about half-past 5 o’clock he was with another boy playing on the West Footscray station. He had a rope tied round his waist, and the other boy was driving him. Reynolds’s companion let go the rope when the train from Sunshine to Melbourne came in, and Reynolds went to the edge of the platform, and dangled the rope over the kerb of the platform as the train was proceeding. All went well until the last carriage came along, then the rope was caught by the carriage, and the boy was dragged about 300 yards along the track. His head was injured by violent contact with the sleepers.

At Dr. Webb’s surgery at Footscray, it was found that he had sustained a fracture of the base of the skull. He was removed to Nurse Drysdale’s private hospital, where he died at about 9 o’clock last night.

On this day …….. 12th of December 1912

Eroni’s Circus has been staying in North East Victoria for a day or two, weather bound, and many of the horses have been greatly affected by the roaring of the wild animals in the menagerie. No doubt thinking they would be eaten, standing in their stalls trembling with fear. A horse owned by Thomas Haywood was badly affected, and was with difficulty made to do his work. Will passing the circus camp on this day in 1912, the horse caught sight of an elephant, and stop and trembled. After a few moments it dropped dead, evidently with fright The horse was valued at £20.

 

According to statistics from the Victorian Injury Surveillance Unit, 28,128 Victorians were injured by animals between July 2004 and June 2007, that is nearly 10 000 a year. But to break that down, almost 7700 Victorians have been taken to hospital during this time after being attacked by dogs. Horses were second on the list, killing two people and injuring a further 5628. Mosquito killed two people and sent 256 more to hospital. 9922 Victorians were hurt by creepy-crawlies, including spiders, bees, wasps, ticks, ants, centipedes and even scorpions. More unusual statistics were that close to 50 Victorians were attacked by monkeys. Family pets such as cats, rabbits and guinea pigs injured 1117 people, and 450 people ended up at a hospital with insects stuck in eyes, nose or ears. Chickens injured 92 people, and stingrays over 50 people. Six people had to be treated after encountering ducks and alpacas. Wombats, kangaroos, wallabies, possums and dingoes were responsible for attacks on 231 people. And 1153 Victorians were attacked in their sleep or while resting or eating.

 

On This Day ……. 6th June 2013

A number of circus animals have been recaptured after breaking loose in the middle of Broome. Cows, camels, llamas, horses and donkeys escaped from their temporary enclosure on Male Oval this morning after a fence post came loose. It took Circus Royale staff about 10 minutes to round up the animals as onlookers watched in amusement. Circus Royale spokesman Daman Syred says the animals may have been trying to take advantage of Broome’s wet weather. “We had a cow and a few of our horses decided to go for a run through some of the puddles that have formed here on the grounds in Broome, so yeah they had a bit of a run around on the oval,” he said.

 

On This Day ……. 2nd May 1900

At Geelong, a man named John Bell was arrested on warrant, immediately on his discharge from Geelong gaol, and charged with obtaining horses at Cobargo, New South Wales, under false pretences in June, 1899. He has been remanded for a week.

 

ON THIS DAY ……… 16th March 1910

Geelong

A sensational runaway occurred in Moorabool street, in Geelong on this day in 1910. Three draught horses attached to a wagon owned by Mr. J. Paterson a farmer, of Anakie. Paterson was driving in Malop street when the lead horse took fright at a motor car. The horses jumped forward and broke the swindle, leaving the driver clinging to the reins, before being pulled from the wagon and onto the pole, between the horses. During the stampede Paterson was thrown under the vehicle, breaking his right arm. The horses galloped at a great pace into Moorabool street, the leader being some distance ahead on the full length of the reins. The animals divided on either side of a street tree, under which an old lady named Perkins was sitting by a young man named Koon. He held her behind the tree just as the leader horse was thrown heavily onto its back though his rope reins fouling the tree. The other two horses and wagon crashed into the Hitchcock ornamental fountain in the Market Reserve. One animal was hurled over the iron fence into the fountain well, and smashed one of the columns to atoms, while the water pipe was broken by the impact, and shot a stream of water 20ft. in the air. The spikes of the iron fence penetrated the flank of one of the horses, and half a dozen men had an exciting time in releasing the horse, the fence eventually having to be demolished.

 

 

On this day …….. 4th of January 1947

Bill Beatty, wrote in The Sydney Morning Herald on this day in 1947, described the experience of two shearers camped by the notorious Wilga waterhole in central-western Queensland some time during the 1890s.

“Suddenly there came a soft, distant walling that grew rapidly nearer and louder the cries appeared to be in different keys devilish, unearthly shrieking, such as no human voices ever uttered”. “We thought our eardrums would burst, but we were too terrified to move. Then, to our fervent relief, the shrieking diminished in volume until it was merely a weird wailing. Moments later, it ceased utterly, and once more the bush was deathly silent.” After the screams had subsided, we quickly packed our camp, gathered the horses and we rode off into the night. ”When we told our story at the shearing shed it was received with derision by most, but others mentioned that the Wilga waterhole was a notorious spot, and that the Aborigines always avoided it. Some of the old shearing hands said that horses were scared of it and drovers admitted that they never could get cattle to rest there. There were instances where cattle driven from distant parts had arrived there almost exhausted but had stampeded at sundown,”.

 

On this day …….. 12th of December 1912

Eroni’s Circus has been staying in North East Victoria for a day or two, weather bound, and many of the horses have been greatly affected by the roaring of the wild animals in the menagerie. No doubt thinking they would be eaten, standing in their stalls trembling with fear. A horse owned by Thomas Haywood was badly affected, and was with difficulty made to do his work. Will passing the circus camp on this day in 1912, the horse caught sight of an elephant, and stop and trembled. After a few moments it dropped dead, evidently with fright The horse was valued at £20.

 

According to statistics from the Victorian Injury Surveillance Unit, 28,128 Victorians were injured by animals between July 2004 and June 2007, that is nearly 10 000 a year. But to break that down, almost 7700 Victorians have been taken to hospital during this time after being attacked by dogs. Horses were second on the list, killing two people and injuring a further 5628. Mosquito killed two people and sent 256 more to hospital. 9922 Victorians were hurt by creepy-crawlies, including spiders, bees, wasps, ticks, ants, centipedes and even scorpions. More unusual statistics were that close to 50 Victorians were attacked by monkeys. Family pets such as cats, rabbits and guinea pigs injured 1117 people, and 450 people ended up at a hospital with insects stuck in eyes, nose or ears. Chickens injured 92 people, and stingrays over 50 people. Six people had to be treated after encountering ducks and alpacas. Wombats, kangaroos, wallabies, possums and dingoes were responsible for attacks on 231 people. And 1153 Victorians were attacked in their sleep or while resting or eating.

 

On This Day ……. 6th June 2013

A number of circus animals have been recaptured after breaking loose in the middle of Broome. Cows, camels, llamas, horses and donkeys escaped from their temporary enclosure on Male Oval this morning after a fence post came loose. It took Circus Royale staff about 10 minutes to round up the animals as onlookers watched in amusement. Circus Royale spokesman Daman Syred says the animals may have been trying to take advantage of Broome’s wet weather. “We had a cow and a few of our horses decided to go for a run through some of the puddles that have formed here on the grounds in Broome, so yeah they had a bit of a run around on the oval,” he said.