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Bendigo Advertiser
4 January 1887

Referring to the recent murderous assault by a daughter upon her mother at Horsham, the “Horsham Times” says that a man named Clarke had been living with a woman named Emma Marquadt, who passed as his wife, and her daughter, Mary, aged sixteen years.

The Attack

On Wednesday afternoon, when going into his house after leaving his work, he found his paramour lying on a bod, having been assaultod about the head and body in a horrible manner by an axe, and the girl, her daughter, bathing the wounds. The woman was senseless, or so nearly so that she could not give any account of the matter, her daughter, upon being questioned, said she knew nothing whatever of it, but that she had been up into town to make some purchases, and returned with the articles she had bought, when all was right she went out again, and on her return the second time found her mother lying on the floor weltering in her blood from the wounds, and an axe lying beside her.

Dr C. Pardy was immediately sent for, and information conveyed to the police. When the former arrived he found the woman speechless and in a very dangerous state, but did what be could to afford relief to the sufferer.

Police Interview

On the police interviewing the girl she persistently adhered to her original story for a length of time, but the officers were not satisfied, and Sub-inspector O’CalLaghan, Sergeant Lirkan, Constables M’Bride and Cameron continued their inquiries apparently to little purpose, until at length the wavering of the girl’s story caused suspicion to turn towards herself, and culminated in her making a clean breast of it to Sergeant Larkan yesterday morning, when, of course, she was immediately arrested, and conveyed to the lockup.

Her storythen was that she went into tho town between 1 and 2 o’clock and made her purchases, and returned to the house, and afterwards, when sitting on an inner step in a doorway in the room, her mother and she had some words, and then she went out into the yard, got the axe, brought it unobserved, and struck her mother several blows from behind, causing the gashes in her head and ab0ut her body, there evidently being some six or eight blows struck. The woman, it seems, struggled to get up, and exclaimed “What have I done to you that you would do this to me!” and the girl replied “I’ll tell you by-and-bye.”

The woman seems then to have staggered to the bed on which she was found, with the assistance of the girl, who then proceeded to wipe up the blood on the floor, and bathe the wounds of the injured woman, at which she was observed when the horrible discovery was made.

Accusation

When questioned as to what led her to commit such an act, the girl informed Sergeant Larkan that it was because the man Clark had taken advantage of her,the consequence being that she was encainte by him. On being asked if she would repeat this statement in the presence of Clarke she replied in the affirmative, and on his being called in she reasserted several times, but it is only fair to add that Clark absolutely denied it.

The girl was presented at tho Police court before Messers Cameron and Bolton, JPs, when she was charged with ” wounding with intent to murder.” The prisoner, who has hard set features, conducted herself in the coolest manner possible, apparently not realising the awful position in which she stood.

Police Court

At the police court, before Mr Hutchinson, the policn magistrate, the girl Mary Marquardt was charged with assaulting her mother, with intent to do her grievous bodily harm. A more serious charge of intent to murder was withdrawn. Several witnesses were examined, from whose evidence it appeared as if the girl assaulted her mother with an axe, but the main evidence in that of her own confession to the man Clark and the police. She made no statement of any kind in court. She was committed for trial at the General Sessions in February.

On this day …….. 10th of June 1929

A government order came into force to restrict road transport. An extension of the Act was made to cover the Boroughs of Echuca, Horsham, Shepparton, St Arnaud and Wangaratta. The Act provided that goods should not be carted by road before 7am, or after 1pm on any afternoon which was usually a regular holiday for shops. No goods could be carted by road after 9pm on any day of the week in which shops closed late in the particular location, or after 7:30pm in the evening of any other day in the week. Road transport was beginning to seriously affect railway freight revenue.

ON THIS DAY – October 8, 1889

 

Catherine M’Donald and John M’Dougall were brought up on remand at the Murtoa Police Court on Thursday on a charge of the wilful murder of their infant at Lubeck early last month. The Bench considered that a prima facie case had been made out, and committed the prisoners to take their trial at the Supreme Court at Horsham on October 8.

 

 

On This Day – September 28, 1901

John Sloane charged with an attempt to murder Emma Mansfield at Horsham on September 28 by cutting her throat, was to-day committed for trial at the Ballarat Assizes.

Miss Mansfield, who fainted while giving evidence, said she never offended or encouraged accused in any way, and if it were said that he was her sweetheart it was not true.

Prisoner said that he had no recollection of the affair.

On This Day – September 19, 1944

A verdict that George Binns, 40 years, a farmer, of Nhill, died from suffocation accidentally caused was returned by the deputy coroner, Mr. M. F. Kelley, J.P., at the inquest to-day.

Puzzling features were linked with the death of Binns, who was found at 10.40 p.m. on September 19 lying dead face downwards, with portion of his body up the stairs of the Bull and Mouth Hotel, Horsham.

Donald McLean, 36 years, charged with the murder of Binns, was present at the inquest, the charge being automatically withdrawn with the verdict of the coroner. Mr. Kelley said he reached the conclusion that death was accidental because, although there was evidence of deceased having been struck two blows in an encounter with McLean. In McLean’s room, there was not sufficient evidence upon which to come to the conclusion that the effect of those blows contributed materially to the suffocation from which Binns died.

ON THIS DAY…… 8th September 1912

Mr Burgoss who is alleged to have victimised Geelong tradesmen by false representations, arrived from Horsham by train in charge of Constable O’Brien, formerly of Geelong West, and was taken to the gaol.

 

ON THIS DAY – July 12, 1909

At the Warrnambool Supreme Court, Albert Hay and Martha Dorothy Caroline Cox were charged with the wilful murder of Edward Boothby Cox, the husband of the female prisoner, at Horsham, on July 12. The charges were heard separately. The evidence was similar to that given at the inquest. The jury found Hay guilty of manslaughter, and he was remanded for sentence. The case against Mrs. Cox is unfinished.

On this day …….. 10th of June 1929

A government order came into force to restrict road transport. An extension of the Act was made to cover the Boroughs of Echuca, Horsham, Shepparton, St Arnaud and Wangaratta. The Act provided that goods should not be carted by road before 7am, or after 1pm on any afternoon which was usually a regular holiday for shops. No goods could be carted by road after 9pm on any day of the week in which shops closed late in the particular location, or after 7:30pm in the evening of any other day in the week. Road transport was beginning to seriously affect railway freight revenue.

On This Day ……. 22nd April 1856

This criminal suffered the penalty of his crimes on this day in 1856, at 8am. Pursuant to the provisions of the Act which abolishes the old mode of public execution, the affair was witnessed by certain officials only, to see that the sentence was duly carried out. An inquest on the body was, in conformity with the act, held in the goal, at twelve noon. A jury was impanelled in the usual way. By direction of the coroner, they proceeded to view the body, and then returned to hear evidence. The coroner read the warrant of his Excellency the Acting Governor. The sheriff gave evidence as to the identity of the person named in the warrant, and the dead body the jury had just seen. The sentence had been carried out in the usual way. The district surgeon was examined as to the same facts. The head goaler testified that the body which the jury had viewed was that of James Ross, who was sentenced to die at the last criminal sessions, and for whose execution a warrant had been produced by the sheriff. The sentence had been duly carried out. This closed the evidence, and the jury unanimously returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased James Ross had been duly executed in pursuance of sentence passed upon him by Sir William A’Beckett, judge of the Supreme Court. It was remembered by most of our readers that James Ross was convicted of the most brutal murder of his own child, and also for the murder of a Mrs Sayers. Ross intended to murder his own wife also, and left her for dead; but she recovered, and is still alive at Horsham. Seldom in the annals of crime has there occurred so atrocious a case—a crime of so black a dye, committed without any apparent adequate motive. From the time of his commitment to the last hour of his existence, Ross admitted the crimes of which he stood charged. He did not wish to live, and repeatedly, since sentence was passed, expressed impatience for the time of execution to be fixed. He spent much time in reading the Bible and other devotional books, and was assiduously attended by the Rev Mr Goodman and the gaol chaplain. Ross’s conversation and demeanour, however, so far as we could judge or learn, was by no means indicative of sincere regret. The culprit, a few days ago, wrote a letter to his wife, who is still an invalid from the cruel injuries she received from her husband. Ross, or Griffiths, was a native of Limerick, his father was Welsh. His crimes were of so deep a dye that even the most enthusiastic abolitionist of capital punishment will admit that the world is well rid of such a monster.

 

ON THIS DAY ……… 5th February 1899

HORSHAM

A medical examination of the fracture skull of the Chinaman named Don Young in Horsham who’s body was found in a hut, showed that the fractures were caused before death by a blow from a blunt instrument. The coroner found the death was coursed by a person or persons unknown.

 

 

ON THIS DAY…… 8th January 1940

A man named William Danaher was charged at the Ararat police court on this day with stealing 51 bottles of beer and stout from a goods train between Ballarat and Ararat. The beer was consigned to Horsham, and accused was sentenced to three months’ in the Geelong gaol.

 

ON THIS DAY – October 8, 1889

 

Catherine M’Donald and John M’Dougall were brought up on remand at the Murtoa Police Court on Thursday on a charge of the wilful murder of their infant at Lubeck early last month. The Bench considered that a prima facie case had been made out, and committed the prisoners to take their trial at the Supreme Court at Horsham on October 8.