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According to statistics from the Victorian Injury Surveillance Unit, 28,128 Victorians were injured by animals between July 2004 and June 2007, that is nearly 10 000 a year. But to break that down, almost 7700 Victorians have been taken to hospital during this time after being attacked by dogs. Horses were second on the list, killing two people and injuring a further 5628. Mosquito killed two people and sent 256 more to hospital. 9922 Victorians were hurt by creepy-crawlies, including spiders, bees, wasps, ticks, ants, centipedes and even scorpions. More unusual statistics were that close to 50 Victorians were attacked by monkeys. Family pets such as cats, rabbits and guinea pigs injured 1117 people, and 450 people ended up at a hospital with insects stuck in eyes, nose or ears. Chickens injured 92 people, and stingrays over 50 people. Six people had to be treated after encountering ducks and alpacas. Wombats, kangaroos, wallabies, possums and dingoes were responsible for attacks on 231 people. And 1153 Victorians were attacked in their sleep or while resting or eating.

 

ON THIS DAY……. 12th April 1952

On this day in 1952, a woman was killed and seven people were seriously injured when two passenger trains collided head on at Moriac, near Geelong, at 8:15pm. Both engines were derailed, and the first carriage of the Geelong-bound train was telescoped by the coal tender. The dead woman was in this carriage. The trains involved were the 3.25pm passenger train from Port Fairy to Geelong, and the 5.50pm train from Melbourne to Warrnambool, which passed through Geelong.

ONE SHUNTING

The Warrnambool-bound train had stopped at Moriac and was shunting into a siding to allow the other train to pass along the single track when the crash occurred. The impact hurled the Warrnambool-bound train backwards and the two engines, badly wrecked, coming to rest 30ft apart. One engine hung at an acute angle on its side and the crew were badly scalded by escaping steam. The crash was heard several miles away and hundreds of people rushed to the scene. Two ambulances were called from Geelong, and ambulance men joined railwaymen and volunteers in freeing the injured from badly damaged carriages.

MANY SHOCKED

Many other passengers were slightly hurt or badly affected by shock. They were treated on the spot. Mr. T. Mather, newsagent and postmaster at Moriac, said the noise of the crash startled him and he was on the scene in a matter of minutes. “There was great confusion,” he said. “People on the trains were calling out for help. Many feared a fire would break out. “However, we soon got relief gangs together and set to work to free those trapped in the wrecked carriage. One woman was dead, and a man seemed to be dead or dying.” Special buses were chartered by the Railway Department to convey the passengers to their destinations. The line was blocked, but repair gangs were soon at work clearing the debris.

On this day …….. 12th of April 1869

William Cook, said to be the best steeplechase rider in the colony was brought into Wahgunyah on this day in 1869 after being injured. Cook had been crushed by a falling horse at Urana Races. The 20 year old died from his injuries.

 

According to statistics from the Victorian Injury Surveillance Unit, 28,128 Victorians were injured by animals between July 2004 and June 2007, that is nearly 10 000 a year. But to break that down, almost 7700 Victorians have been taken to hospital during this time after being attacked by dogs. Horses were second on the list, killing two people and injuring a further 5628. Mosquito killed two people and sent 256 more to hospital. 9922 Victorians were hurt by creepy-crawlies, including spiders, bees, wasps, ticks, ants, centipedes and even scorpions. More unusual statistics were that close to 50 Victorians were attacked by monkeys. Family pets such as cats, rabbits and guinea pigs injured 1117 people, and 450 people ended up at a hospital with insects stuck in eyes, nose or ears. Chickens injured 92 people, and stingrays over 50 people. Six people had to be treated after encountering ducks and alpacas. Wombats, kangaroos, wallabies, possums and dingoes were responsible for attacks on 231 people. And 1153 Victorians were attacked in their sleep or while resting or eating.

 

ON THIS DAY……. 12th April 1952

On this day in 1952, a woman was killed and seven people were seriously injured when two passenger trains collided head on at Moriac, near Geelong, at 8:15pm. Both engines were derailed, and the first carriage of the Geelong-bound train was telescoped by the coal tender. The dead woman was in this carriage. The trains involved were the 3.25pm passenger train from Port Fairy to Geelong, and the 5.50pm train from Melbourne to Warrnambool, which passed through Geelong.

ONE SHUNTING

The Warrnambool-bound train had stopped at Moriac and was shunting into a siding to allow the other train to pass along the single track when the crash occurred. The impact hurled the Warrnambool-bound train backwards and the two engines, badly wrecked, coming to rest 30ft apart. One engine hung at an acute angle on its side and the crew were badly scalded by escaping steam. The crash was heard several miles away and hundreds of people rushed to the scene. Two ambulances were called from Geelong, and ambulance men joined railwaymen and volunteers in freeing the injured from badly damaged carriages.

MANY SHOCKED

Many other passengers were slightly hurt or badly affected by shock. They were treated on the spot. Mr. T. Mather, newsagent and postmaster at Moriac, said the noise of the crash startled him and he was on the scene in a matter of minutes. “There was great confusion,” he said. “People on the trains were calling out for help. Many feared a fire would break out. “However, we soon got relief gangs together and set to work to free those trapped in the wrecked carriage. One woman was dead, and a man seemed to be dead or dying.” Special buses were chartered by the Railway Department to convey the passengers to their destinations. The line was blocked, but repair gangs were soon at work clearing the debris.

On this day …….. 12th of April 1869

William Cook, said to be the best steeplechase rider in the colony was brought into Wahgunyah on this day in 1869 after being injured. Cook had been crushed by a falling horse at Urana Races. The 20 year old died from his injuries.

 

ON THIS DAY …….. 23rd March 1904

Ballarat

John Davies, a miner, working at the Napoleons mine, near Ballarat was injured on this day in 1904. Davies while being hauled to the surface by a windlass, fell from the bucket to the bottom of the shaft, a distance of 30ft. The accident happened when the rope broke. Davies broke both his legs.

 

 

On this day ………… 13th March 1909

A shocking accident, happened on this day in resulting in the death of Mr. George Whitaker, proprietor of the “Korumburra Times,” occurred near Loch. Mr. Whitaker, with four’ others, was returning from the Grantville Show in a buggy. When near Loch a team of horses, attached to a heavy waggon bolted and dashed into the buggy, which was wrecked. All the occupants of the buggy were thrown on to the roadway, and the waggon, passed over Mr. Whitaker, killing him instantly. The others, with the exception of Mr. Talbot Atkins, who was severely bruised, escaped unhurt. About five years ago Mr. Whitaker was thrown from a horse on the Jumbunna road, near Korumburra, and badly injured.

 

 

According to statistics from the Victorian Injury Surveillance Unit, 28,128 Victorians were injured by animals between July 2004 and June 2007, that is nearly 10 000 a year. But to break that down, almost 7700 Victorians have been taken to hospital during this time after being attacked by dogs. Horses were second on the list, killing two people and injuring a further 5628. Mosquito killed two people and sent 256 more to hospital. 9922 Victorians were hurt by creepy-crawlies, including spiders, bees, wasps, ticks, ants, centipedes and even scorpions. More unusual statistics were that close to 50 Victorians were attacked by monkeys. Family pets such as cats, rabbits and guinea pigs injured 1117 people, and 450 people ended up at a hospital with insects stuck in eyes, nose or ears. Chickens injured 92 people, and stingrays over 50 people. Six people had to be treated after encountering ducks and alpacas. Wombats, kangaroos, wallabies, possums and dingoes were responsible for attacks on 231 people. And 1153 Victorians were attacked in their sleep or while resting or eating.

 

ON THIS DAY……. 12th April 1952

On this day in 1952, a woman was killed and seven people were seriously injured when two passenger trains collided head on at Moriac, near Geelong, at 8:15pm. Both engines were derailed, and the first carriage of the Geelong-bound train was telescoped by the coal tender. The dead woman was in this carriage. The trains involved were the 3.25pm passenger train from Port Fairy to Geelong, and the 5.50pm train from Melbourne to Warrnambool, which passed through Geelong.

ONE SHUNTING

The Warrnambool-bound train had stopped at Moriac and was shunting into a siding to allow the other train to pass along the single track when the crash occurred. The impact hurled the Warrnambool-bound train backwards and the two engines, badly wrecked, coming to rest 30ft apart. One engine hung at an acute angle on its side and the crew were badly scalded by escaping steam. The crash was heard several miles away and hundreds of people rushed to the scene. Two ambulances were called from Geelong, and ambulance men joined railwaymen and volunteers in freeing the injured from badly damaged carriages.

MANY SHOCKED

Many other passengers were slightly hurt or badly affected by shock. They were treated on the spot. Mr. T. Mather, newsagent and postmaster at Moriac, said the noise of the crash startled him and he was on the scene in a matter of minutes. “There was great confusion,” he said. “People on the trains were calling out for help. Many feared a fire would break out. “However, we soon got relief gangs together and set to work to free those trapped in the wrecked carriage. One woman was dead, and a man seemed to be dead or dying.” Special buses were chartered by the Railway Department to convey the passengers to their destinations. The line was blocked, but repair gangs were soon at work clearing the debris.

On this day …….. 12th of April 1869

William Cook, said to be the best steeplechase rider in the colony was brought into Wahgunyah on this day in 1869 after being injured. Cook had been crushed by a falling horse at Urana Races. The 20 year old died from his injuries.

 

ON THIS DAY …….. 23rd March 1904

Ballarat

John Davies, a miner, working at the Napoleons mine, near Ballarat was injured on this day in 1904. Davies while being hauled to the surface by a windlass, fell from the bucket to the bottom of the shaft, a distance of 30ft. The accident happened when the rope broke. Davies broke both his legs.