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On this day …….. 10th of June 1876

A powerful and dangerous looking foreigner, Ernest Victor Kodskon, who escaped from the Beechworth Lunatic Asylum on the 10th of June 1876, reached the dwelling of Mr. Ancrum Heriot, and frightened the inmates, as he had a stout stick in bis hand. He craved and obtained shelter for the night, and ate as much as would suffice for three ordinary men. The next morning the police were sent for, and whilst endeavouring to arrest him he struck violently at constable Egan, and were it not that the force of the blow was lessened by the intervention of Mr. Heriot, the constable would have been killed on the spot. As it was the constable received a severe blow on the head, and lost a great deal of blood. The lunatic was handcuffed and brought to Albury, where, on the recommendation of Dr. Andrews, he was remanded for eight days in gaol for medical treatment. It is astonishing some one was not killed by him and that more precautions are not used at the asylum to prevent the escape of such dangerous lunatics. Constable Egan was hospitalised for a week.

On This Day ……. 20th April 1894

On this day in 1894 Geelong council agreed to provide assistance to the Infirmary and Benevolent Asylum, stating that 20 more beds for inmates of the asylum, were needed, which would involve an increased annual outlay of £300. Councillor Abraham remarked that the Town Council had not for many years contributed towards the support of the local charities. He did not know why it had not done so, and he thought, that they should now depart from custom. It was a crying disgrace to them that people should have to be sent to the Geelong gaol merely because they were old and poor.

 

On this day …….. 25th of August 1909

Long Bay Correctional Centre is located at Malabar, about 12 kilometres south of Sydney, New South Wales. It is Australia’s only prison to have been planned from the start with separate prisons for men and women. It was also the first prison in New South Wales to focus on rehabilitating inmates, rather than punishing them. The site was chosen in accordance with the tenets of 1770s English prison reformer John Howard, who believed jails should be positioned away from settled areas and preferably on the rise of a hill, where they would be subject to the full force of the wind. The entire plan for the gaol was based on new and different ideals in reform, such as the ‘restricted association’ advocated by William Frederick Neitenstein, comptroller-general of prisons from 1896 to 1909. ‘restricted association’ limited contact between different groups of prisoners to avoid long-term prisoners from having a corrupting influence on young or first-time offenders. Construction on the female reformatory began in 1901, and this was the first section to be opened. The official opening occurred on 25 August 1909. The male penitentiary opened five years later, in 1914. In 1969, the women were transferred to a new facility at Silverwater. The old women’s reformatory was initially converted into a training centre, then later used for minimum security inmates.

 

On this day …….. 10th of June 1876

A powerful and dangerous looking foreigner, Ernest Victor Kodskon, who escaped from the Beechworth Lunatic Asylum on the 10th of June 1876, reached the dwelling of Mr. Ancrum Heriot, and frightened the inmates, as he had a stout stick in bis hand. He craved and obtained shelter for the night, and ate as much as would suffice for three ordinary men. The next morning the police were sent for, and whilst endeavouring to arrest him he struck violently at constable Egan, and were it not that the force of the blow was lessened by the intervention of Mr. Heriot, the constable would have been killed on the spot. As it was the constable received a severe blow on the head, and lost a great deal of blood. The lunatic was handcuffed and brought to Albury, where, on the recommendation of Dr. Andrews, he was remanded for eight days in gaol for medical treatment. It is astonishing some one was not killed by him and that more precautions are not used at the asylum to prevent the escape of such dangerous lunatics. Constable Egan was hospitalised for a week.

On This Day ……. 16th May 1860

One of the larger than life characters of the early gold rush in North East Victoria was locked up in the Beechworth Gaol on this day in 1860. Doctor Radley had been practising in Chiltern, where there was some doubt about him being qualified doctor. Popular opinion was that he was an aristocrat named Jowitt, in hiding from some overseas scandal. He was certainly a man of considerable talent. During his time in Beechworth Gaol awaiting trail for manslaughter, (for a treatment that didn’t work out), he helped the inmates of the gaol prepare briefs for their trials. He was later tried in Melbourne, and then turned up in Sydney conducting a radical newspaper, exposing the alleged mis-deeds of Sydney society.

On This Day ……. 20th April 1894

On this day in 1894 Geelong council agreed to provide assistance to the Infirmary and Benevolent Asylum, stating that 20 more beds for inmates of the asylum, were needed, which would involve an increased annual outlay of £300. Councillor Abraham remarked that the Town Council had not for many years contributed towards the support of the local charities. He did not know why it had not done so, and he thought, that they should now depart from custom. It was a crying disgrace to them that people should have to be sent to the Geelong gaol merely because they were old and poor.

 

On this day …….. 25th of August 1909

Long Bay Correctional Centre is located at Malabar, about 12 kilometres south of Sydney, New South Wales. It is Australia’s only prison to have been planned from the start with separate prisons for men and women. It was also the first prison in New South Wales to focus on rehabilitating inmates, rather than punishing them. The site was chosen in accordance with the tenets of 1770s English prison reformer John Howard, who believed jails should be positioned away from settled areas and preferably on the rise of a hill, where they would be subject to the full force of the wind. The entire plan for the gaol was based on new and different ideals in reform, such as the ‘restricted association’ advocated by William Frederick Neitenstein, comptroller-general of prisons from 1896 to 1909. ‘restricted association’ limited contact between different groups of prisoners to avoid long-term prisoners from having a corrupting influence on young or first-time offenders. Construction on the female reformatory began in 1901, and this was the first section to be opened. The official opening occurred on 25 August 1909. The male penitentiary opened five years later, in 1914. In 1969, the women were transferred to a new facility at Silverwater. The old women’s reformatory was initially converted into a training centre, then later used for minimum security inmates.

 

On this day …….. 10th of June 1876

A powerful and dangerous looking foreigner, Ernest Victor Kodskon, who escaped from the Beechworth Lunatic Asylum on the 10th of June 1876, reached the dwelling of Mr. Ancrum Heriot, and frightened the inmates, as he had a stout stick in bis hand. He craved and obtained shelter for the night, and ate as much as would suffice for three ordinary men. The next morning the police were sent for, and whilst endeavouring to arrest him he struck violently at constable Egan, and were it not that the force of the blow was lessened by the intervention of Mr. Heriot, the constable would have been killed on the spot. As it was the constable received a severe blow on the head, and lost a great deal of blood. The lunatic was handcuffed and brought to Albury, where, on the recommendation of Dr. Andrews, he was remanded for eight days in gaol for medical treatment. It is astonishing some one was not killed by him and that more precautions are not used at the asylum to prevent the escape of such dangerous lunatics. Constable Egan was hospitalised for a week.

On This Day ……. 16th May 1860

One of the larger than life characters of the early gold rush in North East Victoria was locked up in the Beechworth Gaol on this day in 1860. Doctor Radley had been practising in Chiltern, where there was some doubt about him being qualified doctor. Popular opinion was that he was an aristocrat named Jowitt, in hiding from some overseas scandal. He was certainly a man of considerable talent. During his time in Beechworth Gaol awaiting trail for manslaughter, (for a treatment that didn’t work out), he helped the inmates of the gaol prepare briefs for their trials. He was later tried in Melbourne, and then turned up in Sydney conducting a radical newspaper, exposing the alleged mis-deeds of Sydney society.

On This Day ……. 20th April 1894

On this day in 1894 Geelong council agreed to provide assistance to the Infirmary and Benevolent Asylum, stating that 20 more beds for inmates of the asylum, were needed, which would involve an increased annual outlay of £300. Councillor Abraham remarked that the Town Council had not for many years contributed towards the support of the local charities. He did not know why it had not done so, and he thought, that they should now depart from custom. It was a crying disgrace to them that people should have to be sent to the Geelong gaol merely because they were old and poor.