Posts

ON THIS DAY…… 4th November 1922

Concerts at Geelong Gaol

Since the escape of Angus Murray from Geelong gaol there has been a ban on the fortnightly concerts that were formerly held in the gaol for the entertainment of the prisoners. The Inspector-General has now issued instructions that the concerts may again be held , and with the object of reverting to the former practice it has been decided to hold a concert on the afternoon of Saturday, November 10. The assistance of vocal and other artists is desired. Visitors will notice that the surroundings of the gaol have been improved, as the painters and decorators have renovated and decorated the interior of the building. Angus Murray’s cell has been repaired, and peace and order seem to again prevail. The prisoners’ choir master (Angus Murrray) will be succeeded by another prisoner who shows vocal power. It is not generally known that among the prisoners are several men who can contribute an entertainment.

EXECUTED THIS DAY – April 29, 1857

FRANCIS BRANIGAN, WILLIAM BROWN AND RICHARD BRYANT

EXECUTION OF THE MURDERERS OF MR. PRICE.

EXECUTION OF FRANCIS BRANIGAN, WILLIAM BROWN, AND RICHARD BRYANT.

These criminals suffered death on this day in 1857, and died with the same firmness which had been displayed by their wretched companions in the act of assassination. Previous to their execution, Branigan confessed that he was the first man to attack the late Inspector General, whom he caught in his arms and threw to the ground in the rush. He also stated that the convict Williams, who was executed, was the man who struck Mr. Price on the head with a shovel, and that the prisoner Brown, and some others of the condemned, were innocent of any direct act of violence. While the process of pinioning was going on, Branigan recognised Mr. Sub-Inspector Stoney, by whom and by Inspector Nicholson he had been apprehended in Bullarook Forest, near Ballaarat, in 1855, on the charge of highway robbery, in company with Daniel Donovan, one of the acquitted convicts. Both then obtained at the time a sentence of fifteen years on the roads, the first three in irons. Branigan, on recognising Mr. Stoney, bowed to him and wished him good morning. The fatal preparations being completed, the drop fell; Branigan and Bryant appeared to die instantly, but Brown, who was a young and slight-made man, suffered longer.

 

EXECUTED THIS DAY – April 28, 1857

THOMAS WILLIAMS, HENRY SMITH (ALIAS BRENNAN) AND THOMAS MALONEY

THE MURDER OF MR. PRICE.

Execution of Thomas Williams, Henry Smith alias Brennan, and Thomas Maloney.

On this day in 1857, at eight o’clock, Thomas Williams, Henry Smith alias Brennan, and Thomas Maloney, the first three prisoners convicted at the late Special Sessions of the murder of the late Inspector General at Williamstown, on the 20th March last, were executed in the Melbourne Gaol. The unhappy men, who were all members of the Roman Catholic Church, were attended in their last moments by two ecclesiastics, and it, will be satisfactory to the public to know that all exhibited the appearance of sincere contrition for their criminal career, find patient resignation to their fate. It is remarkable, however, that only one of them, the convict Maloney, made any reference to the crime for which he was about to suffer, and of, which he declared himself innocent to the last. The other two, Williams and Smith, maintained from the first in perfect reserve upon the subject. To those familiar with the criminal character, and its notorious and habitual cunning, this circumstance will not appear in the least subversive of the verdict, of the jury, or of the righteousness of the sentence, as it is quite probable that one or all of the three cherished to the last some faint hope that the penalty would be commuted. There is reason to believe that Smith certainly did this, in consequence of the recommendation to mercy which in his case accompanied the verdict. Of course, a confession of guilt would be incompatible with such expectations. A few minutes after eight o’clock, the condemned men were removed from their cells, and brought into the corridor. Maloney came first, then Henry Smith, and last Thomas Williams. Maloney and Smith appeared in the act of fervent and unceasing prayer. Smith hold his hands closely pressed together above his head, and his lips moved rapidly. Maloney fixed his eyes upwards and never once removed them, also continuing to pray silently, and repeatedly placing his right arm across his breast in the manner of penitential humiliation. He held a crucifix in his hand. Williams did not appear to be so devoutly inclined as the others at first, but as though even his hardened nature had become affected by their example, his lips at length moved rapidly, and he continued to pray to the last. The demeanour of the three was most becoming and reverent. As the process of pinioning was going on, Maloney leaned over and whispered some last request to his spiritual adviser. When all was ready the sad procession moved on, and as it was passing from the corridor the prisoner Smith turned round and made a low bow to the persons who were looking on, as though taking his last farewell of his fellow creatures. Smith appeared to feel his awful position very keenly, and all three betrayed the symptoms of a strong mental and physical agitation, which was with difficulty mastered. Maloney was the first to ascend the scaffold, then came Smith, who was slightly supported by one of the warders, and lastly Williams. In a few minutes the preparations were completed and the drop fell. Smith and Williams seemed to die instantly, but Maloney, who was a slightly framed man, gave a few convulsive movements, and than all was over. The prisoner Maloney came to tho colonies in the year 1840, in the ship King William, a prisoner. He was subsequently convicted of felony and had a sentence of five years hanging over him from 9th August, 1853. His age was S3. He could not read or write, and was a native of Tipperary, by trade a butcher. Henry Smith, or Brennan, came free to the colony in the Coromandel, in 1817. He was 37 years of age when executed, and had previously been convicted of horse-stealing. He was a native of Dublin, and could not read or write. A sentence of six years from 15th August, 1854, was impending over him. Thomas Williams was thirty-two years old, and came to Australia a prisoner in the year by the ship Constant, for robbery. After completing his time, he was, on the 18th November, 1832, convicted on three separate charges, and was sentenced successively to twelve years, six years, and twelve years penal servitude, in all thirty years. He could read imperfectly.

 

ON This Day – 21st March 1930

ATTEMPTED ESCAPE FROM GAOL

After having inquired into the attempted escape of William Hartwell from the Geelong gaol a week earlier. The Inspector General of Penal Establishments decided to take disciplinary action against the warder for alleged lack of proper vigilance, and to commend another warder for his promptness and courage in catching the prisoner.

 

 

On This Day – 4th March 1922

On this day in 1922, the Geelong gaol was visited by Mr Mclvor, Inspector General of the Penal Department. As a result it is expected that a portion or the gaol will be set apart for an indeterminate prison. Men serving indeterminate sentences will be sent to Geelong. The proposed alteration will necessitate an increase in the staff of warders. At present there are about 70 prisoners at the Geelong gaol, including a few “lifers,” men who are serving sentences for life imprisonment. There is no accommodation for females at the gaol now.

 

On This Day – 11th February 1902

Captain Evans, the inspector-general of penal establishment, made an exhaustive inquiry into the alleged discontent which prevails amongst the warders and prisoners of the Geelong Gaol. The inquiry has been commenced at the request of the governor (Mr. Patterson). Already several warders have been examined on oath, and closely questioned in regard to management and statements which have appeared in the press. When the inquiries are complete Captain Evans will furnish a report to the Chief Secretary.

 

 

On this day …….. 11th of January 1922

The Inspector General of NSW Police has received a telegram from Brewarrina stating that Constable Donovan while on duty had been struck by lightning and killed on this day in 1922.

 

ON THIS DAY…… 4th November 1922

Concerts at Geelong Gaol

Since the escape of Angus Murray from Geelong gaol there has been a ban on the fortnightly concerts that were formerly held in the gaol for the entertainment of the prisoners. The Inspector-General has now issued instructions that the concerts may again be held , and with the object of reverting to the former practice it has been decided to hold a concert on the afternoon of Saturday, November 10. The assistance of vocal and other artists is desired. Visitors will notice that the surroundings of the gaol have been improved, as the painters and decorators have renovated and decorated the interior of the building. Angus Murray’s cell has been repaired, and peace and order seem to again prevail. The prisoners’ choir master (Angus Murrray) will be succeeded by another prisoner who shows vocal power. It is not generally known that among the prisoners are several men who can contribute an entertainment.

EXECUTED THIS DAY – April 29, 1857

FRANCIS BRANIGAN, WILLIAM BROWN AND RICHARD BRYANT

EXECUTION OF THE MURDERERS OF MR. PRICE.

EXECUTION OF FRANCIS BRANIGAN, WILLIAM BROWN, AND RICHARD BRYANT.

These criminals suffered death on this day in 1857, and died with the same firmness which had been displayed by their wretched companions in the act of assassination. Previous to their execution, Branigan confessed that he was the first man to attack the late Inspector General, whom he caught in his arms and threw to the ground in the rush. He also stated that the convict Williams, who was executed, was the man who struck Mr. Price on the head with a shovel, and that the prisoner Brown, and some others of the condemned, were innocent of any direct act of violence. While the process of pinioning was going on, Branigan recognised Mr. Sub-Inspector Stoney, by whom and by Inspector Nicholson he had been apprehended in Bullarook Forest, near Ballaarat, in 1855, on the charge of highway robbery, in company with Daniel Donovan, one of the acquitted convicts. Both then obtained at the time a sentence of fifteen years on the roads, the first three in irons. Branigan, on recognising Mr. Stoney, bowed to him and wished him good morning. The fatal preparations being completed, the drop fell; Branigan and Bryant appeared to die instantly, but Brown, who was a young and slight-made man, suffered longer.

 

EXECUTED THIS DAY – April 28, 1857

THOMAS WILLIAMS, HENRY SMITH (ALIAS BRENNAN) AND THOMAS MALONEY

THE MURDER OF MR. PRICE.

Execution of Thomas Williams, Henry Smith alias Brennan, and Thomas Maloney.

On this day in 1857, at eight o’clock, Thomas Williams, Henry Smith alias Brennan, and Thomas Maloney, the first three prisoners convicted at the late Special Sessions of the murder of the late Inspector General at Williamstown, on the 20th March last, were executed in the Melbourne Gaol. The unhappy men, who were all members of the Roman Catholic Church, were attended in their last moments by two ecclesiastics, and it, will be satisfactory to the public to know that all exhibited the appearance of sincere contrition for their criminal career, find patient resignation to their fate. It is remarkable, however, that only one of them, the convict Maloney, made any reference to the crime for which he was about to suffer, and of, which he declared himself innocent to the last. The other two, Williams and Smith, maintained from the first in perfect reserve upon the subject. To those familiar with the criminal character, and its notorious and habitual cunning, this circumstance will not appear in the least subversive of the verdict, of the jury, or of the righteousness of the sentence, as it is quite probable that one or all of the three cherished to the last some faint hope that the penalty would be commuted. There is reason to believe that Smith certainly did this, in consequence of the recommendation to mercy which in his case accompanied the verdict. Of course, a confession of guilt would be incompatible with such expectations. A few minutes after eight o’clock, the condemned men were removed from their cells, and brought into the corridor. Maloney came first, then Henry Smith, and last Thomas Williams. Maloney and Smith appeared in the act of fervent and unceasing prayer. Smith hold his hands closely pressed together above his head, and his lips moved rapidly. Maloney fixed his eyes upwards and never once removed them, also continuing to pray silently, and repeatedly placing his right arm across his breast in the manner of penitential humiliation. He held a crucifix in his hand. Williams did not appear to be so devoutly inclined as the others at first, but as though even his hardened nature had become affected by their example, his lips at length moved rapidly, and he continued to pray to the last. The demeanour of the three was most becoming and reverent. As the process of pinioning was going on, Maloney leaned over and whispered some last request to his spiritual adviser. When all was ready the sad procession moved on, and as it was passing from the corridor the prisoner Smith turned round and made a low bow to the persons who were looking on, as though taking his last farewell of his fellow creatures. Smith appeared to feel his awful position very keenly, and all three betrayed the symptoms of a strong mental and physical agitation, which was with difficulty mastered. Maloney was the first to ascend the scaffold, then came Smith, who was slightly supported by one of the warders, and lastly Williams. In a few minutes the preparations were completed and the drop fell. Smith and Williams seemed to die instantly, but Maloney, who was a slightly framed man, gave a few convulsive movements, and than all was over. The prisoner Maloney came to tho colonies in the year 1840, in the ship King William, a prisoner. He was subsequently convicted of felony and had a sentence of five years hanging over him from 9th August, 1853. His age was S3. He could not read or write, and was a native of Tipperary, by trade a butcher. Henry Smith, or Brennan, came free to the colony in the Coromandel, in 1817. He was 37 years of age when executed, and had previously been convicted of horse-stealing. He was a native of Dublin, and could not read or write. A sentence of six years from 15th August, 1854, was impending over him. Thomas Williams was thirty-two years old, and came to Australia a prisoner in the year by the ship Constant, for robbery. After completing his time, he was, on the 18th November, 1832, convicted on three separate charges, and was sentenced successively to twelve years, six years, and twelve years penal servitude, in all thirty years. He could read imperfectly.

 

ON This Day – 21st March 1930

ATTEMPTED ESCAPE FROM GAOL

After having inquired into the attempted escape of William Hartwell from the Geelong gaol a week earlier. The Inspector General of Penal Establishments decided to take disciplinary action against the warder for alleged lack of proper vigilance, and to commend another warder for his promptness and courage in catching the prisoner.

 

 

On This Day – 4th March 1922

On this day in 1922, the Geelong gaol was visited by Mr Mclvor, Inspector General of the Penal Department. As a result it is expected that a portion or the gaol will be set apart for an indeterminate prison. Men serving indeterminate sentences will be sent to Geelong. The proposed alteration will necessitate an increase in the staff of warders. At present there are about 70 prisoners at the Geelong gaol, including a few “lifers,” men who are serving sentences for life imprisonment. There is no accommodation for females at the gaol now.