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ON THIS DAY…… 26th November 1838

Men found guilty of Myall Creek Aborigines massacre

On 10 June 1838, a gang of stockmen, heavily armed, rounded up between 40 and 50 Aboriginal women, children and elderly men at Henry Dangar’s Myall Creek Station, not far from Inverell in New South Wales. 28 Aborigines were murdered. These were the relatives of the Aboriginal men who were working with the station manager, William Hobbs. It was believed that the massacre was payback for the killing of several colonists in the area, yet most of those massacred were women and children. At a trial held on November 15 that year, twelve Europeans were charged with murder but acquitted. Following uproar from some colonists at the aquittal of the men, another trial was held on 26 November 1838. Following the retrial, 7 men were charged with murder and sentenced to be hung in December, under the authority of Governor George Gipps.

ON THIS DAY…… 15th November 1838

The perpetrators of the Myall Creek Massacre in New South Wales are acquitted

On 10 June 1838, a gang of stockmen, heavily armed, rounded up between 40 and 50 Aboriginal women, children and elderly men at Myall Creek Station, not far from Inverell in New South Wales. 28 Aborigines were murdered. It was believed that the massacre was payback for the killing of several colonists in the area, yet most of those massacred were women and children. At a trial held on 15 November 1838, twelve Europeans were charged with murder but acquitted. Another trial was held on November 26, during which the twelve men were charged with the murder of just one Aboriginal child. They were found guilty, and seven of the men were hanged in December under the authority of Governor George Gipps.

On This Day……… 2nd April 1945

A police force equipped with rifles was called out at 3am on the 2nd of April 1945, to fight two tigers and a mandrill (a large sized monkey) which escaped from their cages 21 miles from Inverell. The animals belonged to Perry Bros. Circus, and the cages were smashed in a road accident. When the police arrived at the scene they heard a woman screaming in, a house some distance from the road. In the bright moonlight they saw one tiger coming from the direction of the house, and Sergeant Toone and Constable Moore both scored fatal hits. A second tiger was then seen tearing at the body of the mandrill, which it had killed. When it came bounding towards the police officers, Sergeant Toone and Constable Book scored bull’s eyes. The tiger jumped high in the air with a roar and crashed to death. The screaming woman was Mrs W. Dean, who was in the house with four children. Her husband was away rabbiting. A year-old baby was sleeping with Mrs, Dean, and two boys and a girl, aged 10, eight and three, were sleeping on the open verandah. She saw the tiger when she rose to investigate the fierce barking of a dog, and was just in time to see the animal leap in the fowl run and kill a number of fowls. In a frenzy she dashed for the children. She bundled her daughter inside from the back verandah and her sons from the front verandah, slamming the front door in the tiger’s face as it ambled up the pathway. She closed all windows and barricaded the door. She heard the tiger slump down at the door as though to guard. It went away just as the police arrived by car. The tigers were valued at £300 each, and the mandrill at £500. They are a serious loss to the circus people.

 

 

On this day …….. 19th of January 1910

A live horse was found stuck in the fork of a tree at Myall Creek, near Inverell, NSW on the 19th of January 1910. The tree was cut down and the horse walked away none the worse for it’s experience.  Our question – how on earth did it get up there??

 

 

ON THIS DAY…… 26th November 1838

Men found guilty of Myall Creek Aborigines massacre

On 10 June 1838, a gang of stockmen, heavily armed, rounded up between 40 and 50 Aboriginal women, children and elderly men at Henry Dangar’s Myall Creek Station, not far from Inverell in New South Wales. 28 Aborigines were murdered. These were the relatives of the Aboriginal men who were working with the station manager, William Hobbs. It was believed that the massacre was payback for the killing of several colonists in the area, yet most of those massacred were women and children. At a trial held on November 15 that year, twelve Europeans were charged with murder but acquitted. Following uproar from some colonists at the aquittal of the men, another trial was held on 26 November 1838. Following the retrial, 7 men were charged with murder and sentenced to be hung in December, under the authority of Governor George Gipps.

ON THIS DAY…… 15th November 1838

The perpetrators of the Myall Creek Massacre in New South Wales are acquitted

On 10 June 1838, a gang of stockmen, heavily armed, rounded up between 40 and 50 Aboriginal women, children and elderly men at Myall Creek Station, not far from Inverell in New South Wales. 28 Aborigines were murdered. It was believed that the massacre was payback for the killing of several colonists in the area, yet most of those massacred were women and children. At a trial held on 15 November 1838, twelve Europeans were charged with murder but acquitted. Another trial was held on November 26, during which the twelve men were charged with the murder of just one Aboriginal child. They were found guilty, and seven of the men were hanged in December under the authority of Governor George Gipps.

On This Day……… 2nd April 1945

A police force equipped with, rifles was called out at 3am on the 2nd of April 1945, to fight two tigers and a mandrill (a large sized; monkey) which escaped from their cages 21 miles from Inverell. The animals belonged to Perry Bros.’ Circus, and the cages were smashed in a road accident. When the police arrived at the scene they heard a woman screaming in, a house some distance from the road. In the bright moonlight they saw one tiger coming from the direction of the house, and Sergeant Toone and Constable Moore both scored fatal hits. A second tiger was then seen tearing at the body of the mandrill, which it had killed. When it came bounding towards the police officers, Sergeant Toone and Constable Book scored bull’s eyes’. The tiger jumped high in the air with a roar and crashed to death. The screaming woman was Mrs W. Dean, who was in the house with four children. Her husband, was away rabbiting. A year-old baby was sleeping with Mrs, Dean, and two boys and a girl, aged 10, eight and three, were sleeping on the open verandah. She saw the tiger when she rose to investigate the fleece barking of a dog, and was just in time to see the animal leap in the fowl run and kill a number of fowls. In a frenzy she dashed for the children. She bundled her daughter in side from the back verandah and her sons from the front verandah, slamming the front door in the tiger’s face as it ambled up the pathway. She closed all windows and barricaded the door. She heard, the tiger slump down at the door as though to guard. It went away just as the police arrived by car. The tigers were valued at £300 each, and the mandrill at £500. They are a serious loss to the circus people.

 

 

On this day …….. 19th of January 1910

A live horse was found stuck in the fork of a tree at Myall Creek, near Inverell, NSW on the 19th of January 1910. The tree was cut down and the horse walked away none the worse for it’s experience.  Our question – how on earth did it get up there??

 

 

A live horse was found stick in the fork of a tree at Myall Creek, near Inverell, NSW on the 19th of January 1910. The tree was cut down and the horse walked away none the worse for it’s experience.