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On This Day – November 30, 1942

The wife of a naturalised Australian was committed for trial by City Coroner on a charge of having murdered her husband, Sebastina Maddalon aged 40, on the 30th November 1942. Maddalon an Italian born draper of Newport, at South Yarra. May Florence Maddalon aged 27, wife of the dead man, had been separated from her husband for nearly two years before she murdered him.

ON THIS DAY ………… 4th September 1932

With almost half his head shot off and a wound in his leg, Giovanni Carretti, 36 year old Italian market gardener, of Werribee, was found murdered, outside his hut on the  4th September 1932.  Carretti occupied a six acre irrigation holding, 4 miles from Werribee and lived alone in a two-roomed hut. He was last seen alive on the 3rd. The dead man was found by his friends, lying in a pool of blood 10 feet from the building.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – May 19, 1934

BODY UNDER CULVERT

A Coroner’s inquiry was opened concerning the death of the Italian laborer named Rocco Petaulla, whoso charred body was found under a culvert at Balwyn by some children. Dr. D.H. Mollison, Government Pathologist, expressed the opinion that death was due to suffocation and haemorrhage following a blow on tho head. The witness said the face was almost unrecognisable, and the trunk was much charred, while on the left side of the frontal bone of the head there was a hole three-quarters of an inch in diameter. There was no evidence of a bullet in the skull. The injury could have been caused by the rounded end of a small tomahawk.  Two Italians named Antonio Chiodo and Antonio Audino, who have been charged with the murder of Petaulla, were present in custody. James Dallis, 28, motor-cycle wrecker of North Melbourne, said that he had done carrying work for Audino and Chiotlo. They came, to him on May 19 and told him that they had been robbed of £92. That night Chiodo returned, and said, that his brother wanted witness to take a parcel to Olinda, to raise some money. He would be paid £2 for the job.  When he went to the shop four Italians were talking excitedly in Italian. He waited a little while and was given £2. When he went outside, his cycle had been pushed up a small lane. There was a big tarpaulin on the trailer, and all he could see was a big, bulky object under, it. Chiodo and Audino sat on top, and they travelled to Balwyn, Chiodo told him to pull up, and they then lifted the object from the trailer. It was very dark. witness then returned home.  Chiodo replied that there was nothing wrong, and nothing that concerned him. “If anybody asks you, you know nothing about us,” he said to witness. They then left, and on the following Friday witness reported to Detective McGuffie.

POLICE EVIDENCE

Senior Detective McGuffie described the various pieces of clothing found burned in the culvert and the piece of hessian, and Italian dictionary also recovered.

Detective Rosewarne said that he recognised the clothing, when he previously searched Petaulla at the Detective Office. McGuffie related how he interviewed Trixtino and Chiodo, and told them that the police believed that the charred body was that of Petaulla, who had been murdered at Chiodo’s shop. Chiodo denied this, and also denied having given Dallis £2 to remove the body. When Audino came in he denied that Petaulla had been at the shop since the day he went to the detective office.  The inquest is not completed.

ON THIS DAY – May 11, 1936

MELBOURNE

Dominico Melito (42), an Italian, was sentenced by Justice Sir James MacFarland in the Criminal Court to-day to six years’ imprisonment for the manslaughter of Rosario Esposito (24) on May 11. Melito was originally charged with murder, but the jury found him guilty of manslaughter, and recommended him to mercy. Esposito was shot dead following a dispute over a girl.

On this day ………… 23rd February 1887

At the Kew Court a repulsive looking Italian, named Neparto Viutomto, was brought up for being found at night on certain premises without lawful excuse, and for unlawfully assaulting a man named William Anderson. The evidence showed that about midnight on the 23rd of February the prisoner was seen to enter the window of a bedroom of the Surrey Hotel, Balwyn, in which three young children were sleeping. The man Anderson and two other men, attempted to capture the prisoner, when he fought like a wild beast, and bit a large piece of flesh from the hand of Anderson. After some struggling, the prisoner was overpowered, and his captors then tied him with rope and convoyed him to the police lockup. The prisoner made a statement to the bunch in broken English, but he could hardly be understood. The judge sentenced him to 3 months in gaol.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – December 29, 1937

ITALIAN LABOURER SENT FOR TRIAL

A graphic story of events leading up to and following the killing of Mrs. Edith Rachel Praetz or Walker at her secondhand shop in North Melbourne on December 29, was told by Jean Richards, a young woman who said she was living with an Italian labourer, Antonio Barbara, 35, at the time. Barbara was committed for trial on a charge of murder. Richards told the coroner that after she and Barbara had run away from Mrs. Praetz’ shop, he attacked her with a knife, but it slipped. She grabbed it, threw it away and then escaped herself.

The City Coroner (Mr. Tingate. P.M.) found that at North Melbourne on December 29 Mrs. Edith Rachel Praetz (or Walker) died from the effects of knife wounds in the neck. feloniously and maliciously inflicted by Barbara.

Application for bail was refused. Evidence was given that detectives investigating” the case had been handed the following letter, signed by Barbara: “Sir – Regards Italian you are seeking for in connection with the Victoria street murdered. I am personally writing to you. So you can rely I will call at headquarters. Russell street. not later than noon. Monday, January 4, 1937. “Being a sport follower. I would like to know how the third Test. England v. Australia, starts, as I hope Australia wins the toss, also the match. Wishing you a happy new years. with best respects. Barbara, Antonio.”

Jean Richards. single. said she had known Mrs. Walker for four years, and had stopped at her place several times.. On December 29 she was living with Barbara in North Melbourne. He returned home about 3.30 p.m.. and after an argument about money had become enraged and struck her as she lay on a bed. He had been drinking. She left the house, taking her baby with her and as she was walking along the street Mrs. Walker asked her to go inside. While she was in the kitchen Mrs. Walker came in from the front and told her that someone had gone to tell Tony she was there. “I said I had better go.” continued witness. “but as I was leaving Tony came in. Mrs. Walker asked him ‘What are you doing in my shop? Haven’t the police told you not to come in?’ “Tony replied. ‘You are going to be a copper again.’ Then he knocked her down. “‘I then ran out of the shop.” witness went on. “When I returned Tony had one hand on Mrs. Walker’s shoulder. He picked up a knife from the dresser. and I called out. ‘Tony, don’t. Stop.’ He turned towards me and I ran out on to the footpath. Then Tony came out. took my arm, and told me to come home. He said. ‘Look what she made me do.’ “I turned, and could see Mrs. Walker’s legs protruding from the door. They were bloodstained.

Struggle in Kitchen

On the way home Richards said that Barbara told her he was going to do for her. too. When they reached his house there were about 10 men in the dining room. Barbara ran into the kitchen and returned with a knife. He pushed witness and her baby to the floor. He held her by the throat with one hand and the knife in the other, but the knife slipped, and, grabbing it, she threw it among the men standing in the room. Two of them tried to drag Barbara away, and while they held him she left the house. Next day she went to the police.

In a statement read by Detective Adam and alleged to have been made by Barbara, the Italian stated that Mrs. Walker had sent for him, and when he went round, she had run at him with the knife. He stepped aside. and she again rushed at him. He grabbed her. and they struggled near the stove. Then he saw blood on her neck, and he and Jean Richards ran away. He met another Italian. who drove him to Werribee. and when he returned to Melbourne he heard that Mrs. Walker had died. He then went to Oakleigh by taxi and wandered round in the bush.

Albert Rainsford, 43, butcher, of North Melbourne, said that the dead woman, who was 51, was his sister. Before her marriage her name was Walker, while she had also been known as Sutcliffe. She conducted a secondhand shop in North Melbourne. Walter Boyce, who said he had been living at Mrs. Walker’s place, stated that after taking a mesage to Barbara that Mrs. Walker wanted to see him, he went for a walk. When he returned he saw Barbara and a woman named Jean Richards running out of the front door. Mrs. Walker was following them and she called out to witness to get the police, as Tony had stabbed her She then fell on the footpath

Newman Spielvogel. pawnbroker, told of his discovery of Mrs. Walker lying on the footpath. He had heard rows and fights at Mrs. Walker’s premises. Death was due to a wound in the neck, which could have been caused by a knife, was the evidence of Dr. Mollison. Government Pathologist. According to First Constable Myers a trail of blood led from the spot where the woman’s body was found to the kitchen of her house, where there was a large pool. In the kitchen he found a large bloodstained knife. on the blade of which there was human hair.

MURDER OF HUSBAND

The wife of a naturalised Australian was committed for trial by City Coroner on a charge of having murdered her husband, Sebastina Maddalon aged 40, on the 30th November 1942. Maddalon an Italian born draper of Newport, at South Yarra. May Florence Maddalon aged 27, wife of the dead man, had been separated from her husband for nearly two years before she murdered him.

ON THIS DAY ………… 4th September 1932

With almost half his head shot off and a wound in his leg, Giovanni Carretti, 36 year old Italian market gardener, of Werribee, was found murdered, outside his hut on the  4th September 1932.  Carretti occupied a six acre irrigation holding, 4 miles from Werribee and lived alone in a two-roomed hut. He was last seen alive on the 3rd. The dead man was found by his friends, lying in a pool of blood 10 feet from the building.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – May 19, 1934

BODY UNDER CULVERT

A Coroner’s inquiry was opened concerning the death of the Italian laborer named Rocco Petaulla, whoso charred body was found under a culvert at Balwyn by some children. Dr. D.H. Mollison, Government Pathologist, expressed the opinion that death was due to suffocation and haemorrhage following a blow on tho head. The witness said the face was almost unrecognisable, and the trunk was much charred, while on the left side of the frontal bone of the head there was a hole three-quarters of an inch in diameter. There was no evidence of a bullet in the skull. The injury could have been caused by the rounded end of a small tomahawk.  Two Italians named Antonio Chiodo and Antonio Audino, who have been charged with the murder of Petaulla, were present in custody. James Dallis, 28, motor-cycle wrecker of North Melbourne, said that he had done carrying work for Audino and Chiotlo. They came, to him on May 19 and told him that they had been robbed of £92. That night Chiodo returned, and said, that his brother wanted witness to take a parcel to Olinda, to raise some money. He would be paid £2 for the job.  When he went to the shop four Italians were talking excitedly in Italian. He waited a little while and was given £2. When he went outside, his cycle had been pushed up a small lane. There was a big tarpaulin on the trailer, and all he could see was a big, bulky object under, it. Chiodo and Audino sat on top, and they travelled to Balwyn, Chiodo told him to pull up, and they then lifted the object from the trailer. It was very dark. witness then returned home.  Chiodo replied that there was nothing wrong, and nothing that concerned him. “If anybody asks you, you know nothing about us,” he said to witness. They then left, and on the following Friday witness reported to Detective McGuffie.

POLICE EVIDENCE

Senior Detective McGuffie described the various pieces of clothing found burned in the culvert and the piece of hessian, and Italian dictionary also recovered.

Detective Rosewarne said that he recognised the clothing, when he previously searched Petaulla at the Detective Office. McGuffie related how he interviewed Trixtino and Chiodo, and told them that the police believed that the charred body was that of Petaulla, who had been murdered at Chiodo’s shop. Chiodo denied this, and also denied having given Dallis £2 to remove the body. When Audino came in he denied that Petaulla had been at the shop since the day he went to the detective office.  The inquest is not completed.

ON THIS DAY – May 11, 1936

MELBOURNE

Dominico Melito (42), an Italian, was sentenced by Justice Sir James MacFarland in the Criminal Court to-day to six years’ imprisonment for the manslaughter of Rosario Esposito (24) on May 11. Melito was originally charged with murder, but the jury found him guilty of manslaughter, and recommended him to mercy. Esposito was shot dead following a dispute over a girl.

On this day ………… 23rd February 1887

At the Kew Court a repulsive looking Italian, named Neparto Viutomto, was brought up for being found at night on certain premises without lawful excuse, and for unlawfully assaulting a man named William Anderson. The evidence showed that about midnight on the 23rd of February the prisoner was seen to enter the window of a bedroom of the Surrey Hotel, Balwyn, in which three young children were sleeping. The man Anderson and two other men, attempted to capture the prisoner, when he fought like a wild beast, and bit a large piece of flesh from the hand of Anderson. After some struggling, the prisoner was overpowered, and his captors then tied him with rope and convoyed him to the police lockup. The prisoner made a statement to the bunch in broken English, but he could hardly be understood. The judge sentenced him to 3 months in gaol.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – December 29, 1937

ITALIAN LABOURER SENT FOR TRIAL

A graphic story of events leading up to and following the killing of Mrs. Edith Rachel Praetz or Walker at her secondhand shop in North Melbourne on December 29, was told by Jean Richards, a young woman who said she was living with an Italian labourer, Antonio Barbara, 35, at the time. Barbara was committed for trial on a charge of murder. Richards told the coroner that after she and Barbara had run away from Mrs. Praetz’ shop, he attacked her with a knife, but it slipped. She grabbed it, threw it away and then escaped herself.

The City Coroner (Mr. Tingate. P.M.) found that at North Melbourne on December 29 Mrs. Edith Rachel Praetz (or Walker) died from the effects of knife wounds in the neck. feloniously and maliciously inflicted by Barbara.

Application for bail was refused. Evidence was given that detectives investigating” the case had been handed the following letter, signed by Barbara: “Sir – Regards Italian you are seeking for in connection with the Victoria street murdered. I am personally writing to you. So you can rely I will call at headquarters. Russell street. not later than noon. Monday, January 4, 1937. “Being a sport follower. I would like to know how the third Test. England v. Australia, starts, as I hope Australia wins the toss, also the match. Wishing you a happy new years. with best respects. Barbara, Antonio.”

Jean Richards. single. said she had known Mrs. Walker for four years, and had stopped at her place several times.. On December 29 she was living with Barbara in North Melbourne. He returned home about 3.30 p.m.. and after an argument about money had become enraged and struck her as she lay on a bed. He had been drinking. She left the house, taking her baby with her and as she was walking along the street Mrs. Walker asked her to go inside. While she was in the kitchen Mrs. Walker came in from the front and told her that someone had gone to tell Tony she was there. “I said I had better go.” continued witness. “but as I was leaving Tony came in. Mrs. Walker asked him ‘What are you doing in my shop? Haven’t the police told you not to come in?’ “Tony replied. ‘You are going to be a copper again.’ Then he knocked her down. “‘I then ran out of the shop.” witness went on. “When I returned Tony had one hand on Mrs. Walker’s shoulder. He picked up a knife from the dresser. and I called out. ‘Tony, don’t. Stop.’ He turned towards me and I ran out on to the footpath. Then Tony came out. took my arm, and told me to come home. He said. ‘Look what she made me do.’ “I turned, and could see Mrs. Walker’s legs protruding from the door. They were bloodstained.

Struggle in Kitchen

On the way home Richards said that Barbara told her he was going to do for her. too. When they reached his house there were about 10 men in the dining room. Barbara ran into the kitchen and returned with a knife. He pushed witness and her baby to the floor. He held her by the throat with one hand and the knife in the other, but the knife slipped, and, grabbing it, she threw it among the men standing in the room. Two of them tried to drag Barbara away, and while they held him she left the house. Next day she went to the police.

In a statement read by Detective Adam and alleged to have been made by Barbara, the Italian stated that Mrs. Walker had sent for him, and when he went round, she had run at him with the knife. He stepped aside. and she again rushed at him. He grabbed her. and they struggled near the stove. Then he saw blood on her neck, and he and Jean Richards ran away. He met another Italian. who drove him to Werribee. and when he returned to Melbourne he heard that Mrs. Walker had died. He then went to Oakleigh by taxi and wandered round in the bush.

Albert Rainsford, 43, butcher, of North Melbourne, said that the dead woman, who was 51, was his sister. Before her marriage her name was Walker, while she had also been known as Sutcliffe. She conducted a secondhand shop in North Melbourne. Walter Boyce, who said he had been living at Mrs. Walker’s place, stated that after taking a mesage to Barbara that Mrs. Walker wanted to see him, he went for a walk. When he returned he saw Barbara and a woman named Jean Richards running out of the front door. Mrs. Walker was following them and she called out to witness to get the police, as Tony had stabbed her She then fell on the footpath

Newman Spielvogel. pawnbroker, told of his discovery of Mrs. Walker lying on the footpath. He had heard rows and fights at Mrs. Walker’s premises. Death was due to a wound in the neck, which could have been caused by a knife, was the evidence of Dr. Mollison. Government Pathologist. According to First Constable Myers a trail of blood led from the spot where the woman’s body was found to the kitchen of her house, where there was a large pool. In the kitchen he found a large bloodstained knife. on the blade of which there was human hair.