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ON THIS DAY – July 19, 1904

The Coroner, Mr. Cole, concluded the inquest to-day concerning the death of Mrs. Mary Amelia Veitch, at Clifton Hill, on July 19. James Williams, the young man who was arrested on a charge of murder, was present in custody. He displayed hardly any interest in the proceedings. The evidence tendered added nothing to the facts already stated. The Coroner found that the deceased met her death at the hands of James Williams, who was committed for trial on a charge of wilful murder.

On this Day – April 11, 1914

ACCUSED MAN REMANDED. MISS BASS TELLS STORY.

By the train which arrived at Ballarat at 3 o’clock on Tuesday from Linton, James Williams came under escort as a prisoner, charged with the attempted murder at Linton on Monday afternoon of Sarah Bass. He had been brought before Mr. F. Kennedy, J.P., and remanded to appear at Ballarat next Tuesday. Williams was lodged in the Ballarat gaol. Sergeant Rogerson states that Williams told him he came from Bite Bite station, in the Ararat district, some days ago, and, beyond giving his name, refused to say anything further.

It appears that Mr. C. McCook, manager of the Mount Bute estate, near Linton, engaged Williams as a general hand, to start work on Tuesday, but on Monday Williams was required to relieve another member of the staff, who had gone to the races. By direction he drove to Linton and brought the mail in. About a quarter past four, after inquiring of Archibald McCook, 12, and Clarice McCook, 13, son and daughter of the manager, if their parents were at home, and receiving a negative reply, Williams learned from the children that the housekeeper, Sarah Bass, was in the kitchen, and he walked in that direction. Soon after this Williams was seen approaching the men’s hut, from the direction of the homestead. He was holding his head with his hands, saying, “My poor head is splitting.” It was then discovered that Miss Bass was badly cut on the head, and was lying unconscious in the kitchen. Williams was secured and handed over to the police.

To-day (Tuesday) Miss Bass is cheerful, and appears to be out of danger. One wound at the back of her neck is four inches long, and required six stitches to be inserted by Dr. Donaldton. There are four other wounds in the back of the head, three exposing the bone, which was also cut. Miss Bass states that Williams asked her for a drink of hot milk and water as he had heartburn. She supplied him, and he called for a second drink. While he was getting this she saw Williams take down a butcher’s meat chopper from the wall, but she did not guess his purpose. Immediately afterwards she received a blow on the back of the neck, and remembered no more until some time afterwards.

On this day …….. 15th of December 1899

James Williams, who escaped from the Castlemaine gaol on the 9th of August 1889, was charged at the police court on this day in 1899, with that offence. He was described by Mr. Daly, governor of the gaol, as an incorrigible young man, and Mr. G. T. Woolley, J.P., sentenced him to 12 months’ imprisonment, with hard labour.

On This Day – September 8, 1904

THE EXECUTION OF JAMES WILLIAMS.

The execution of the youth James Williams, who on 19th July murdered Mrs. Veitch, at Clifton Hill, Victoria, was carried out at the Melbourne Gaol. On the previous day the Rev. C. Bardin, the Church of England clergyman, who has been giving spiritual counsel to Williams since sentence was passed upon him, spent a long time with the condemned man, and as he left he handed to the governor of the gaol a statement, in writing, which had been prepared by Williams. During the night before his execution Williams slept soundly, awaking only once at about 1 a.m., when he asked for “a smoke.” On the morning of the execution, on the ringing of first “rouse” bell, at 6.15 a.m., he awoke, dressed, and ate with apparent appetite and relish a hearty breakfast of ham and eggs. Shortly after 9 a.m. the Rev. Mr. Bardin was admitted to the cell in which the condemned man was confined, and remained with him until the deputy sheriff demanded the prisoner. Williams walked on to the drop with a firm step. When asked whether he had anything to say before the sentence of the court was completed, he said, speaking in very low tones, but with steady voice:—”I am very sorry for the deed that I have done.” Here he made a brief pause, then added, slowly, ”very, very sorry.” The cap was drawn over his face, and the executioner was adjusting the knot in the rope, when, in almost inaudible tones, he spoke again, saying, “God forgive me.”

The body was given a drop of 7 feet 9 inches, and death was instantaneous, not a quiver of the well developed figure being noticeable after the rope ran taut.

ON THIS DAY – July 19, 1904

The Coroner, Mr. Cole, concluded the inquest to-day concerning the death of Mrs. Mary Amelia Veitch, at Clifton Hill, on July 19. James Williams, the young man who was arrested on a charge of murder, was present in custody. He displayed hardly any interest in the proceedings. The evidence tendered added nothing to the facts already stated. The Coroner found that the deceased met her death at the hands of James Williams, who was committed for trial on a charge of wilful murder.

On this Day – April 11, 1914

ACCUSED MAN REMANDED. MISS BASS TELLS STORY.

By the train which arrived at Ballarat at 3 o’clock on Tuesday from Linton, James Williams came under escort as a prisoner, charged with the attempted murder at Linton on Monday afternoon of Sarah Bass. He had been brought before Mr. F. Kennedy, J.P., and remanded to appear at Ballarat next Tuesday. Williams was lodged in the Ballarat gaol. Sergeant Rogerson states that Williams told him he came from Bite Bite station, in the Ararat district, some days ago, and, beyond giving his name, refused to say anything further.

It appears that Mr. C. McCook, manager of the Mount Bute estate, near Linton, engaged Williams as a general hand, to start work on Tuesday, but on Monday Williams was required to relieve another member of the staff, who had gone to the races. By direction he drove to Linton and brought the mail in. About a quarter past four, after inquiring of Archibald McCook, 12, and Clarice McCook, 13, son and daughter of the manager, if their parents were at home, and receiving a negative reply, Williams learned from the children that the housekeeper, Sarah Bass, was in the kitchen, and he walked in that direction. Soon after this Williams was seen approaching the men’s hut, from the direction of the homestead. He was holding his head with his hands, saying, “My poor head is splitting.” It was then discovered that Miss Bass was badly cut on the head, and was lying unconscious in the kitchen. Williams was secured and handed over to the police.

To-day (Tuesday) Miss Bass is cheerful, and appears to be out of danger. One wound at the back of her neck is four inches long, and required six stitches to be inserted by Dr. Donaldton. There are four other wounds in the back of the head, three exposing the bone, which was also cut. Miss Bass states that Williams asked her for a drink of hot milk and water as he had heartburn. She supplied him, and he called for a second drink. While he was getting this she saw Williams take down a butcher’s meat chopper from the wall, but she did not guess his purpose. Immediately afterwards she received a blow on the back of the neck, and remembered no more until some time afterwards.

On This Day – 14th February 1864

Convicts Henry Holm and James Williams were charged with fighting at the Geelong gaol on this day in 1864. Both men were charged by turnkey Leys and given 48 hours in solitary confinement on bread and water.

 

 

ON THIS DAY…… 28th December 1905

James Williams was charged at the Geelong Court with obtaining money by false pretences. Evidence was given that on December 28, he went to the Prince of Wales Hotel, and tendered a cheque for three pounds, signed by J. Clarke. He endorsed the cheque with the name of James O’Malley, and the licensee then cashed it. He also cashed a cheque for £2 15s at the Brewers’ Arms Hotel. Both cheques wore valueless. The accused, in defence, said that two spielers got hold of him. One showed him a cheques for £7O, and said that they had a share in a horse running at Colac races. The men persuaded accused to cash the cheques, and he handed all the money to them. The accused said his real name was Frederick Clarke. The prisoner was sentenced to three months’ detention in Geelong gaol.

On this day …….. 15th of December 1899

 

James Williams, who escaped from the Castlemaine gaol on the 9th of August 1889, was charged at the police court on this day in 1899, with that offence. He was described by Mr. Daly, governor of the gaol, as an incorrigible young man, and Mr. G. T. Woolley, J.P., sentenced him to 12 months’ imprisonment, with hard labour.

Executed This Day – September 8, 1904

“In a Fit of Passion”

The text of the confession made by Williams on the day before his death reads as follows:

7th September 1904

Melbourne Gaol

“I, James Coleman Augustus Williams, who is now about to suffer, the extreme penalty of the law, do hereby make the following confession, and I trust will clear away any doubts which might be on the public.mind :-That I, in a fit of passion, did commit the horrible deed, for which I am very sorry and that it was not for gain, or lust, or any malice which I had against her, for she was always kind and good to me. And I trust that the public will not look down upon my family and friends for the deed that I have done. Trusting that God will forgive me for all that I have done. I also thank the governor and the Rev. Mr. Hardin and the Rev. Mr. Feathers, and the officials for their kindness to me. My last wish is that this should be made public through the press.”

On This Day – September 8, 1904

THE EXECUTION OF JAMES WILLIAMS.

The execution of the youth James Williams, who on 19th July murdered Mrs. Veitch, at Clifton Hill, Victoria, was carried out at the Melbourne Gaol. On the previous day the Rev. C. Bardin, the Church of England clergyman, who has been giving spiritual counsel to Williams since sentence was passed upon him, spent a long time with the condemned man, and as he left he handed to the governor of the gaol a statement, in writing, which had been prepared by Williams. During the night before his execution Williams slept soundly, awaking only once at about 1 a.m., when he asked for “a smoke.” On the morning of the execution, on the ringing of first “rouse” bell, at 6.15 a.m., he awoke, dressed, and ate with apparent appetite and relish a hearty breakfast of ham and eggs. Shortly after 9 a.m. the Rev. Mr. Bardin was admitted to the cell in which the condemned man was confined, and remained with him until the deputy sheriff demanded the prisoner. Williams walked on to the drop with a firm step. When asked whether he had anything to say before the sentence of the court was completed, he said, speaking in very low tones, but with steady voice:—”I am very sorry for the deed that I have done.” Here he made a brief pause, then added, slowly, ”very, very sorry.” The cap was drawn over his face, and the executioner was adjusting the knot in the rope, when, in almost inaudible tones, he spoke again, saying, “God forgive me.”

The body was given a drop of 7 feet 9 inches, and death was instantaneous, not a quiver of the well developed figure being noticeable after the rope ran taut.

ON THIS DAY – July 19, 1904

The Coroner, Mr. Cole, concluded the inquest to-day concerning the death of Mrs. Mary Amelia Veitch, at Clifton Hill, on July 19. James Williams, the young man who was arrested on a charge of murder, was present in custody. He displayed hardly any interest in the proceedings. The evidence tendered added nothing to the facts already stated. The Coroner found that the deceased met her death at the hands of James Williams, who was committed for trial on a charge of wilful murder.