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On this day …….. 6th of July 1955

Mr C. J. Vernon of Kew, Victoria won fourth prize in two different lotteries on this day in 1955.

 

ON THIS DAY…… 18th December 1901

The prisoner at Geelong Gaol, John Gambil whose name figures upon the gaol records very frequently for disorderly conduct and breaches of gaol discipline, was brought before the visiting magistrates on this day in 1901. Evidence was given by two doctors that the man was Insane. Gambil was committed to the asylum at Kew.

On This Day – December 13, 2003

Graeme Kinniburgh garnered notoriety for his role in the Melbourne gangland killings. On 13 December 2003, Kinniburgh himself was murdered outside his home in Kew on Belmont Avenue. Two members of a rival criminal gang, or a two-man operation, was suspected of involvement in his death; Carl Williams was questioned, and Andrew Veniamin was treated as a suspect. In 2004, Mick Gatto claimed that Veniamin had implicated himself in Kinniburgh’s death prior to himself being killed, but it was later shown that Veniamin had been on the other side of town at the time of the murder. This was deduced by tracking his mobile phone at the time of the murder. However, this in turn has been disputed as a case of the mobile phone and not Veniamin having an alibi. If Veniamin had been one of the two gunmen who killed Kinnisburgh, then the identity of the other has never been established.

In November 2015, police charged Stephen John Asling with Kinniburgh’s murder.

ON THIS DAY…… 5th September 1892

 

On this day in 1892 a bakers carter named George Griffiths was met by a weak, emaciated woman at Kew carrying a bundle containing a dead child and enquiring the way to the tram. He told the police and she was removed to the Women’s Hospital, but is not expected to recover. The child had large wounds to the forehead. At the inquest it was stated the child had been murdered, but the mother was to ill to make a statement.

On this day …….. 6th of July 1955

Mr C. J. Vernon of Kew, Victoria won fourth prize in two different lotteries on this day in 1955.

 

On This Day ……. 8th May 2013

Marjorie Hemmerde, 106, Enjoys ‘Living In Sin’ With 73-year-old Boy Toy, Gavin Crawford. Marjorie Hemmerde is dating a man 33 years younger, but no one is accusing her of robbing the cradle. Hemmerde is 106 and her “boy toy,” Gavin Crawford, is 73. The two have managed to find love despite their massive age difference. The two met three years ago at Kew Gardens, an old folks home in the suburb of Kew, Victoria, and are now inseparable.

 

ON THIS DAY – March 5, 1924

KEW

Charged with having murdered Maud Ada Anderson at Studley Park, Kew, on the 5th of March, Albert Pauthenet appeared at the Criminal. There was no appearance of John Peter Hogan, an important Crown witness, who was said to have been an eyewitness to a struggle between Pauthenet and Anderson on the river bank. The Crown alleged that Pauthenet during a quarrel at a drinking party of a number of men and women, threw Anderson into the river. The jury found Pauthenet guilty of manslaughter, with a strong recommendation to mercy. The case is to be taken to the Full Court.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – February 11, 1876

There was great excitement in Geelong on this day in 1876, with respect to the horrible murder and suicide by William Stenton. An inquests were held on the body of the maniacal murderer and his unfortunate victim. The jury found that Mrs. Stenton had been killed by her husband whilst he was in a state of insanity, and that the murderer committed suicide whilst temporarily insane. With regard to the lunatic the jury expressed regret that the authorities at the Kew Asylum had allowed Stenton to leave so soon after his admission about a month or so. The evidence which was adduced at both inquests showed showed that Stenton had been very morose since his return from Kew, but although he was sullen and avoided strangers, his actions over aroused any suspicion that he would commit such a desperate murder as that enacted on the banks of the Barwon river.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – February 8, 1952

WYCHEPROOF

With a strong recommendation for mercy on the grounds of his youth and upbringing, a Supreme Court jury at Bendigo found Walter George Atkins, 14, farm laborer, of Edgevale Road, Kew, guilty of having murdered Robert William Trewin, 40, grazier, and Mrs. Lydia Gordon Trewin, 60, of Kalpieuntmg, near Wycheproof, on February the 8th. Mr. Justice Coppel told Atkins that, since he was not 18 when the two crimes were committed, the law provided that he could only pass one sentence, that he be detained during the Governor’s pleasure. Accordingly, he sentenced Atkins on each count. Atkins, who pleaded not guilty, heard the verdict and sentence almost impassively. It was alleged by the Crown that Atkins shot Trewin when he was sacked for having failed to dig postholes, a job which Trewin had given him before leaving for the funeral, and later that he shot Mrs.Trewin because she was possibly a witness. Dr. H. Bearly of Beaumaris, a psychiatrist, said at the hearing that from the X-ray of the boy’s skull (he was thrown from a horse in 1950) and from what he had heard in the case, he would consider Atkins must have suffered some damage to the brain tissue under the fracture, and also possible damage to the frontal region, which governs behavior and deals chiefly with reasoning, judgment, and the higher intellect of our faculties.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – January 16, 1939

KEW

Neighbour called the police to a home in Kew this afternoon detectives found the body of a seven months old girl on a bed, the infant having been strangled. probably with a silk stocking. The child’s mother, who has been in poor health lately, was arrested. Later Kathleen Merle Still (33), was charged with murder.

 

 

On this day …….. 10th of January 1943

Identified by two mobile traffic police while he was wheeling a new bicycle up a hill in Studley Park rd, Kew, Oscar Walter Speck, 36, a German internee, who escaped from a Goulburn valley internment camp on this day in 1943, was recaptured at 5pm. Constables F. Towns and H. C. Patterson were on patrol duty in Studley Park rd when they recognised Speck from a photograph They had in their car. At first Speck denied he was the escapee, and said his name was Schmidt. When the police said that they would take him to police headquarters Speck said that the game was up, and he admitted his identity. Speck was dressed in shorts, a dark coat, and a grey felt hat. He said that he had left his camp clothing at the camp and escaped with a working suit. He came to Melbourne by train, and purchased a bicycle and other articles. He then rode the machine to Seymour, where he had been camping, until he rode back to Melbourne after his food supplies ran out. Speck’s bicycle was laden with blankets, rug, provision bags, kitbag, and other camping gear. He told police that he intended to camp on the beach before cycle to Sydney. He spoke good English. He was in good health, but he would not explain where he obtained money to buy goods when he arrived in Melbourne, or how he had escaped. Police regarded Speck as a prisoner of ingenuity. He came to Australia from Europe in a collapsible boat, arriving in Australia before the outbreak of war, and was interned in 1939. He was handed over by police to military authorities last night, and will probably be sent to another camp hundreds of miles from the camp from which he escaped. Police will probably inquire how Speck bought his bicycle without an essential user’s permit.

ON THIS DAY…… 18th December 1901

The prisoner at Geelong Gaol, John Gambil whose name figures upon the gaol records very frequently for disorderly conduct and breaches of gaol discipline, was brought before the visiting magistrates on this day in 1901. Evidence was given by two doctors that the man was Insane. Gambil was committed to the asylum at Kew.