Posts

On this day …….. 31st of July 1902

On this day in 1902 an explosion occurred at Mount Kemble mine in New South Wales killing 96 miners. Unable to find there way out in the aftermath, three miners had the idea to unhitching a pit pony (blind horse used underground) from a skip and grabbing hold of the harness in the hope that it would pull them along in the darkened tunnel to daylight. The pony lead the men to freedom. Another miner abandoned his pony and made his way to the surface. It took him two days to reach safety, while his horse walked out itself a few hours after he had left it.

 

ON THIS DAY ……… 30th March 1948

The question of justification arose in the case In which John Kenneth Donnelly (19), of Opie street, Ferntree Gully, apprenticed carpenter, was charged in the Criminal Court to-day with having murdered his step-father, John Palmer (63), laborer, of the same address, at Ferntree Gully on March 30.
The Crown prosecutor (Mr. Nolan) said the family were living unhappily. Palmer came home for his tea in an intoxicated condition and the question arose as to where the children should sleep. Palmer complained of children sleeping in his bedroom.
In a confession to the police, accused had stated: “He (Palmer) had been cruel to my mother and the children. I got home at 6.20 p.m. and he came home at 7 p.m. drunk. The children kept complaining about all sleeping in the one bedroom. I sent one of the children to his bedroom and he told her to get out. I then sent another child to the room and he threatened her. He started to swing at me. He started to belt my mother, and I went on the verandah sleepout and loaded a rifle I saw him belting my mother again as I looked through the window. I look a quick aim and pulled the trigger.
Constable Charles Light, of Ferntree Gully, said during the seven years he had been stationed there he found accused to be hard working, quiet youth. On the night of March 30 Donnelly told him that he had hit him In self defence and thought Palmer was dead. At Palmer’s four-roomed house he found the rifle, which had an empty shell in the breach.

The jury in the Criminal Court took only eight minutes to decide that John K. Donnelly, 19, apprentice carpenter, of Ferntree Gully, was not guilty of a charge of the murder or manslaughter of his stepfather, John Palmer. Donnelly told the court that he shot his stepfather on this day in 1948 when Palmer was attacking his mother. He knew his mother was going to have a baby and his only thought was to prevent Palmer from killing her or earning her such harm that she would die. Mrs Palmer, mother of the accused and nine other children, told the court that Palmer had beaten her regularly.

 

On this day …….. 18th of October 1928

The Coniston Massacre was the last known massacre of Australian Aborigines. Occurring at Coniston cattle station, Northern Territory, Australia, it was a revenge killing for the death of dingo hunter Frederick Brooks, who was believed to have been killed by Aborigines in August 1928. Constable William Murray, officer in charge at Barrow Creek, investigated and came to the conclusion that the killing had been done by members of the Warlpiri, Anmatyerre and Kaytetye people. There were no witnesses, and apparent inconsistencies in Murray’s report were never questioned. Murray took matters into his own hand. Over the next few days, up until 30 August, he shot 17 members of the Aboriginal tribes he believed were responsible, and claimed his actions were made in self-defence and that each tribal member he had killed was in possession of some item belonging to Brooks. In the ensuing weeks, Murray again encountered several groups of Aborigines while investigating another non-fatal attack on a settler named Nugget Morton at Broadmeadows Station. Together with Morton, one other white man and an aboriginal boy, Murray embarked on a campaign of revenge, during which another 14 Aborigines were killed. He returned to Alice Springs with his report on 18 October 1928. Murray was never punished for his actions. On the contrary, the Board of Enquiry members were selected to maximise damage-control. It was believed at the time that Murray’s actions were appropriate for the circumstances. The Central Land Council organised the seventy-fifth anniversary of the massacre, commemorated near Yuendumu on 24 September 2003.

 

ON THIS DAY – October 16, 2002

The victim was found dead by his brother around 10am on October 16, 2002 – half seated and half slumped on the floor against his bed. He had been killed three days earlier and had been shot five times in the head with a .38 handgun.

Kallipolitis became extremely paranoid, which could have been because of his steroid and other drug use. He would always have a firearm at home. The fact that he was killed in his bedroom and there were no signs of a struggle would suggest he had someone he knew in his house prior to his death.

It was suggested that Benji Venamin was responsible for the killing.

The two were always up for a chat and on October 12 they had a total of 18 telephone conversations.

Veniamin dropped PK off at his home about 9 o’clock that evening and, police claim, went into the fortified house with his mate – probably to discuss business. Kallipolitis made his last call to a local panel-beating firm around 8.55pm – possibly to discuss debts.

Associates said Benji was a regular visitor and Kallipolitis was at ease in his company – a perfect formula for an underworld ambush.

From that night Benji would never ring his mate again, although it would be three days before the body would be discovered. The conclusion was obvious. Veniamin knew PK would not answer as he was slumped dead in the bedroom.

The autopsy showed he was shot in the temple, back of the head and just above the right eye at point-blank range.

Located on the bed was a blue carry bag containing neatly folded tracksuit pants and T-shirts. There was a sawn-off shotgun, black leather gloves and two shotgun cartridges. On a nearby dresser crime scene examiners found a handwritten sign that said ”Gotcha Gone C………, Ha, Ha, Ha.”

One theory is that Kallipolitis wrote the note he intended to use in an armed robbery as part of his debt collection business. Another was that it was a Veniamin taunt to his now dead friend. It was an expression Benji often used to end his text messages.

Benji would not live to be charged with the murder – he was shot dead in a case of self-defence by Melbourne identity Mick Gatto in 2004.

On this day …….. 31st of July 1902

On this day in 1902 an explosion occurred at Mount Kemble mine in New South Wales killing 96 miners. Unable to find there way out in the aftermath, three miners had the idea to unhitching a pit pony (blind horse used underground) from a skip and grabbing hold of the harness in the hope that it would pull them along in the darkened tunnel to daylight. The pony lead the men to freedom. Another miner abandoned his pony and made his way to the surface. It took him two days to reach safety, while his horse walked out itself a few hours after he had left it.

 

On this day ……… 28th of May 1999

Joseph Quadara, a 57-year-old greengrocer, was ambushed by two people and killed in a Toorak carpark in the early hours on this day in 1999, as he was about to start work at a Safeway supermarket. The former millionaire was declared bankrupt in 1994. Police believed that his killing was a case of mistaken identity, due to the existence of another Giuseppe “Joe” Quadara involved in Melbourne’s fruit and vegetable industry with underworld connections, although Joe himself had connections to the Melbourne’s fruit and vegetable markets and it is conspired that the Markets God-Father; Frank Benevenuto hired Andrew “Benji” Veniamin to perform the hit.

On This Day……… 3rd April 1884

There was great excitement in Sunbury on this day in 1884, when the goods train from Melbourne exploded. The train left the Melbourne terminus at 2am, and made it as far as Sunbury when the boiler of the engine burst with a terrific explosion, killing the fireman instantaneously and the drive shortly after.

 

 

ON THIS DAY ……… 30th March 1948

The jury in the Criminal Court took only eight minutes to decide that John K. Donnelly, 19, apprentice carpenter, of Ferntree Gully, was not guilty of a charge of the murder or manslaughter of his stepfather, John Palmer. Donnelly told the court that he shot his stepfather on this day in 1948 when Palmer was attacking his mother. He knew his mother was going to have a baby and his only thought was to prevent Palmer from killing her or earning her such harm that she would die. Mrs Palmer, mother of the accused and nine other children, told the court that Palmer had beaten her regularly.

 

ON THIS DAY ……. 24th March 1951

YARRAWALLA SOUTH

Herbert Frederick Wason aged 16, of Long Gully, Bendigo, was sent to gaol for five years by for the manslaughter of his former employer. Wason, who cannot read or write and is said to have the mental age of about 9 1/2 years, was charged with the murder of George Archibald Bill aged 49, of Yarrawalla South on This day in 1851. The evidence showed that Wason missed his bus from Yarrawalla South to Bendigo and went to Bill’s home with the idea of taking Bill’s car. Wason found a rifle in the car and shot Bill when he was not looking. Bill ran to an old dairy and Wason fired again. Wason drove the car to Yarrawalla South and abandoned it. He told police he did not mean to kill Bill. Evidence also showed that Bill had taken a fatherly interest in the youth and that they got on well together. In passing sentence, Justice Hudson told Wason, “Your crime consisted of shooting at short range at a man who gave you no provocation whatever. The only semblance of reason for shooting Bill was that you wanted to take a motor vehicle to go home. Ironically enough you were taught to use a rifle by the man you killed. The jury apparently took the view on the medical evidence that mentally you did not realise the consequences of shooting, and the likelihood of killing.”

 

EXECUTED ON THIS DAY ………. 23rd of March 1891

John Wilson, age 23 was executed in Old Melbourne gaol

John Wilson, a tram conductor, was engaged to 24-year-old domestic servant Stella Leah Marks. On the 24th of January 1891, he saw her walking arm in arm with another man in Bourke street and on seeing this he became jealous. On the next day he demanded an explanation, and some words passed between them. In the evening, he accompanied her to her home at Clifton Hill and asked her to go for a walk. He again demanded explanation about the other man and became enraged. Wilson would cut her throat, killing her instantly. Then he tried to commit suicide, but lacked courage to do so. He was charged with murder, stood trial at the Melbourne Criminal Court and was convicted and sentenced to death on the 25th of February 1891. Wilson was hanged at Melbourne gaol at 10am on the 23rd of March 1891.

 

 

On this day …….. 18th of October 1928

The Coniston Massacre was the last known massacre of Australian Aborigines. Occurring at Coniston cattle station, Northern Territory, Australia, it was a revenge killing for the death of dingo hunter Frederick Brooks, who was believed to have been killed by Aborigines in August 1928. Constable William Murray, officer in charge at Barrow Creek, investigated and came to the conclusion that the killing had been done by members of the Warlpiri, Anmatyerre and Kaytetye people. There were no witnesses, and apparent inconsistencies in Murray’s report were never questioned. Murray took matters into his own hand. Over the next few days, up until 30 August, he shot 17 members of the Aboriginal tribes he believed were responsible, and claimed his actions were made in self-defence and that each tribal member he had killed was in possession of some item belonging to Brooks. In the ensuing weeks, Murray again encountered several groups of Aborigines while investigating another non-fatal attack on a settler named Nugget Morton at Broadmeadows Station. Together with Morton, one other white man and an aboriginal boy, Murray embarked on a campaign of revenge, during which another 14 Aborigines were killed. He returned to Alice Springs with his report on 18 October 1928. Murray was never punished for his actions. On the contrary, the Board of Enquiry members were selected to maximise damage-control. It was believed at the time that Murray’s actions were appropriate for the circumstances. The Central Land Council organised the seventy-fifth anniversary of the massacre, commemorated near Yuendumu on 24 September 2003.

 

ON THIS DAY – October 16, 2002

The victim was found dead by his brother around 10am on October 16, 2002 – half seated and half slumped on the floor against his bed. He had been killed three days earlier and had been shot five times in the head with a .38 handgun.

Kallipolitis became extremely paranoid, which could have been because of his steroid and other drug use. He would always have a firearm at home. The fact that he was killed in his bedroom and there were no signs of a struggle would suggest he had someone he knew in his house prior to his death.

It was suggested that Benji Venamin was responsible for the killing.

The two were always up for a chat and on October 12 they had a total of 18 telephone conversations.

Veniamin dropped PK off at his home about 9 o’clock that evening and, police claim, went into the fortified house with his mate – probably to discuss business. Kallipolitis made his last call to a local panel-beating firm around 8.55pm – possibly to discuss debts.

Associates said Benji was a regular visitor and Kallipolitis was at ease in his company – a perfect formula for an underworld ambush.

From that night Benji would never ring his mate again, although it would be three days before the body would be discovered. The conclusion was obvious. Veniamin knew PK would not answer as he was slumped dead in the bedroom.

The autopsy showed he was shot in the temple, back of the head and just above the right eye at point-blank range.

Located on the bed was a blue carry bag containing neatly folded tracksuit pants and T-shirts. There was a sawn-off shotgun, black leather gloves and two shotgun cartridges. On a nearby dresser crime scene examiners found a handwritten sign that said ”Gotcha Gone C………, Ha, Ha, Ha.”

One theory is that Kallipolitis wrote the note he intended to use in an armed robbery as part of his debt collection business. Another was that it was a Veniamin taunt to his now dead friend. It was an expression Benji often used to end his text messages.

Benji would not live to be charged with the murder – he was shot dead in a case of self-defence by Melbourne identity Mick Gatto in 2004.