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On this day …….. 3rd of August 1914

One of the men captured at Yea by Constable Buck and Mr Grant escaped from Kilmore gaol on the morning of the 3rd August 1914. He was taken back to the gaol.

 

On Friday the 29th of July 1859, the Kilmore gaol was opened for the reception of prisoners, after having taken a year and nine months to build. The buildings are surrounded by stone walls 16 feet high with half-round coping, and guard house overlooking the yards, which were also surrounded by stone walls of the same class, but even then prisoners made their escape. The dimensions of the building were 54 feet by 26 feet. The whole building was divided into eight compartments—four large and four small. There was four small cells for the prisoners, two on each side of the gaoler’s room which is in the centre.” At that time and for some

years afterwards some of the worst criminals in Victoria were sent to Kilmore for safe keeping, but from the time of the destruction of the Kelly gang of bushrangers in June, 1880, the building had been little used until the Kilmore dairy company took it over for a more peaceful purpose than keeping prisoners. The company paid pretty heavy rent for years, until they purchased the property from the Government for the small sum of £300, and paid cash down, so they secured the place for a mere song. It was intended to gradually make alterations and improvements until the place is an up-to-date butter factory, and about the first alteration will be the pulling down of the stone walls, the Kilmore shire council having agreed to purchase the stone broken into 2½ inch metal for road purposes in quantities required, at 5s per yard stacked at the factory.

On this day …….. 3rd of August 1914

One of the men captured at Yea by Constable Buck and Mr Grant escaped from Kilmore gaol on the morning of the 3rd August 1914. He was taken back to the gaol.

 

On Friday the 29th of July 1859, the Kilmore gaol was opened for the reception of prisoners, after having taken a year and nine months to build. The buildings are surrounded by stone walls 16 feet high with half-round coping, and guard house overlooking the yards, which were also surrounded by stone walls of the same class, but even then prisoners made their escape. The dimensions of the building were 54 feet by 26 feet. The whole building was divided into eight compartments—four large and four small. There was four small cells for the prisoners, two on each side of the gaoler’s room which is in the centre.” At that time and for some

years afterwards some of the worst criminals in Victoria were sent to Kilmore for safe keeping, but from the time of the destruction of the Kelly gang of bushrangers in June, 1880, the building had been little used until the Kilmore dairy company took it over for a more peaceful purpose than keeping prisoners. The company paid pretty heavy rent for years, until they purchased the property from the Government for the small sum of £300, and paid cash down, so they secured the place for a mere song. It was intended to gradually make alterations and improvements until the place is an up-to-date butter factory, and about the first alteration will be the pulling down of the stone walls, the Kilmore shire council having agreed to purchase the stone broken into 2½ inch metal for road purposes in quantities required, at 5s per yard stacked at the factory.

On this day …….. 30th of December 1864

About six weeks ago a notorious bushranger was arrested near Seymour, charged with horse-stealing. On being brought before the Kilmore bench he gave the name of Lowry, but had been known to the police under the aliases of Cook and Davis, and was suspected of several robberies in the neighbourhood of Heathcote and at other places. When he was arrested, by Constable Deasy, Lowry, it appears, fired at the constable as he approached the hut, the constable returning the fire, his shot carrying away a portion of the bushranger’s lip. In consequence of having given refuge to the bushranger the hutkeeper was also arrested. The prisoner, who was remanded by the Kilmore bench, effected his escape from the Kilmore gaol on this day in 1864.

 

On this day …….. 3rd of August 1914

One of the men captured at Yea by Constable Buck and Mr Grant escaped from Kilmore gaol on the morning of the 3rd August 1914. He was taken back to the gaol.

 

On Friday the 29th of July 1859, the Kilmore gaol was opened for the reception of prisoners, after having taken a year and nine months to build. The buildings are surrounded by stone walls 16 feet high with half-round coping, and guard house overlooking the yards, which were also surrounded by stone walls of the same class, but even then prisoners made their escape. The dimensions of the building were 54 feet by 26 feet. The whole building was divided into eight compartments—four large and four small. There was four small cells for the prisoners, two on each side of the gaoler’s room which is in the centre.” At that time and for some

years afterwards some of the worst criminals in Victoria were sent to Kilmore for safe keeping, but from the time of the destruction of the Kelly gang of bushrangers in June, 1880, the building had been little used until the Kilmore dairy company took it over for a more peaceful purpose than keeping prisoners. The company paid pretty heavy rent for years, until they purchased the property from the Government for the small sum of £300, and paid cash down, so they secured the place for a mere song. It was intended to gradually make alterations and improvements until the place is an up-to-date butter factory, and about the first alteration will be the pulling down of the stone walls, the Kilmore shire council having agreed to purchase the stone broken into 2½ inch metal for road purposes in quantities required, at 5s per yard stacked at the factory.

On This Day – 31 Jan 1897

An inquest was held on the body of Joseph Hurst, who it was supposed to have been murdered by his wife at Kilmore on this day in 1897. The accused denies that she committed the deed. Medical testimony is to the effect that there is a wound an inch an and a half long over the right eye, but did not reach the bone. The left side of his face was bruised, and also the chest and ribs. Mrs Hurst was found guilty and transferred from the Kilmore to Melbourne Gaol.

 

 

On this day …….. 30th of December 1864

About six weeks ago a notorious bushranger was arrested near Seymour, charged with horse-stealing. On being brought before the Kilmore bench he gave the name of Lowry, but had been known to the police under the aliases of Cook and Davis, and was suspected of several robberies in the neighbourhood of Heathcote and at other places. When he was arrested, by Constable Deasy, Lowry, it appears, fired at the constable as he approached the hut, the constable returning the fire, his shot carrying away a portion of the bushranger’s lip. In consequence of having given refuge to the bushranger the hutkeeper was also arrested. The prisoner, who was remanded by the Kilmore bench, effected his escape from the Kilmore gaol on this day in 1864.

 

On this day …….. 25th of December 1860

Two prisoners named Ryan and Williams escaped from the Kilmore Gaol on Christmas Day 1860.