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On This Day – December 2, 1911

 

An appalling domestic tragedy, resulting in the loss of five lives, was enacted at Kyabram early on Saturday morning, when Frank Cooling killed his wife and three of his children with a razor with which he had apparently been shaving, and committed suicide by cutting his throat. A son and a daughter, who were sleeping in the front bedroom, escaped the murderer’s fury. They awoke at the usual time, but waited for their mother to call them. As she did not come, they left their bed, and were confronted with the evidences of the murder. Beside themselves with terror, they ran, horror-stricken, to a neighbours house, and sobbed out the story of the tragedy.

The victims of the tragedy are Frank Cooling, aged 38 years, labourer, Sarah Ann Cooling, his wife, aged 28 years. Alfred John Cooling, son, aged 11 years, Henry James Cooling, son, aged two years, Alexander Francis Cooling, son, aged six weeks.  The two children who escaped are Chrissie aged six years, and Walter, aged 4. There was another child, Alice Mary, aged 9 years, who is in the Echuca Hospital. She had been a patient there for some time and it was the intention of Mr. and Mrs. Cooling to drive to Echuca on Saturday and bring her home. Arrangements had been made with Mr. Tonkin, a neighbour, to attend to the stock while they were away. The family lived in a four-roomed weatherboard cottage in Fernaughty street. They were well known in the district, where Cooling’s father carried on operations as a farmer.

ON THIS DAY…….. 16th of March 1955

A barroom quarrel following slighting references to a man’s wife preceded a fatal shooting, two witnesses told the Supreme Court. The husband, Allan Stewart McLean, 41, carpenter, of Kyabram, is charged with murder. The other man Thomas Young “Larry” Smith, aged 28, builder, of Lord st., Richmond, was shot in the stomach at Kyabram on March the 16th. His injuries were caused by a pea-rifle bullet, McLean pleaded not guilty. William Augustine Hurley, hotel licensee, of Kyabram, said his attention was called to trouble in the bar at 5.45pm on March the 16th. He heard McLean say to Smith: “I would not drink with you,” to which Smith replied, “The trouble with you is you don’t know where your missus is.” Smith then said, “Why don’t you take me out and beat me up?” to which McLean said, “There is time enough for that later.” Smith, said Hurley, replied, “All right; at your place at 7pm,” tapping his watch at the same time. Hurley said that at closing time he saw McLean stagger back from a blow and then prepare to fight Smith, but the row was broken up. Questioned by Mr. J. P. Maloney (for McLean), Hurley said Smith was affected by drink. Joseph Augustine Doolan, carpenter, of Kyabram, said that early this year when Mrs. McLean left home McLean said to him, “I will shoot the -.” Doolan said he told McLean, “Don’t be a fool; no man is worthing hanging for.” To Mr. Maloney Doolan said he had no doubt that Smith was looking for a fight with McLean.

 

 

On this day …….. 31st of January 1953

Keith Murray Hoyes, 27, a married man living with his wife on his father’s dairy form of Cooma, near Kyabram, was killed by lightning on this day in 1953. When a severe thunderstorm struck the district at about 4.30 p.m., Hayes, who had been doing irrigating work, ran to a tree for shelter. When he had not returned to help with the milking at 6 p.m., his father searched for him and found his body underneath the tree, which had been split by lightning. The body was conveyed to the Mooroopna Hospital by ambulance.

 

 

On This Day – December 2, 1911

 

An appalling domestic tragedy, resulting in the loss of five lives, was enacted at Kyabram early on Saturday morning, when Frank Cooling killed his wife and three of his children with a razor with which he had apparently been shaving, and committed suicide by cutting his throat. A son and a daughter, who were sleeping in the front bedroom, escaped the murderer’s fury. They awoke at the usual time, but waited for their mother to call them. As she did not come, they left their bed, and were confronted with the evidences of the murder. Beside themselves with terror, they ran, horror-stricken, to a neighbours house, and sobbed out the story of the tragedy.

The victims of the tragedy are Frank Cooling, aged 38 years, labourer, Sarah Ann Cooling, his wife, aged 28 years. Alfred John Cooling, son, aged 11 years, Henry James Cooling, son, aged two years, Alexander Francis Cooling, son, aged six weeks.  The two children who escaped are Chrissie aged six years, and Walter, aged 4. There was another child, Alice Mary, aged 9 years, who is in the Echuca Hospital. She had been a patient there for some time and it was the intention of Mr. and Mrs. Cooling to drive to Echuca on Saturday and bring her home. Arrangements had been made with Mr. Tonkin, a neighbour, to attend to the stock while they were away. The family lived in a four-roomed weatherboard cottage in Fernaughty street. They were well known in the district, where Cooling’s father carried on operations as a farmer.

ON THIS DAY…….. 16th of March 1955

A barroom quarrel following slighting references to a man’s wife preceded a fatal shooting, two witnesses told the Supreme Court. The husband, Allan Stewart McLean, 41, carpenter, of Kyabram, is charged with murder. The other man Thomas Young “Larry” Smith, aged 28, builder, of Lord st., Richmond, was shot in the stomach at Kyabram on March the 16th. His injuries were caused by a pea-rifle bullet, McLean pleaded not guilty. William Augustine Hurley, hotel licensee, of Kyabram, said his attention was called to trouble in the bar at 5.45pm on March the 16th. He heard McLean say to Smith: “I would not drink with you,” to which Smith replied, “The trouble with you is you don’t know where your missus is.” Smith then said, “Why don’t you take me out and beat me up?” to which McLean said, “There is time enough for that later.” Smith, said Hurley, replied, “All right; at your place at 7pm,” tapping his watch at the same time. Hurley said that at closing time he saw McLean stagger back from a blow and then prepare to fight Smith, but the row was broken up. Questioned by Mr. J. P. Maloney (for McLean), Hurley said Smith was affected by drink. Joseph Augustine Doolan, carpenter, of Kyabram, said that early this year when Mrs. McLean left home McLean said to him, “I will shoot the -.” Doolan said he told McLean, “Don’t be a fool; no man is worthing hanging for.” To Mr. Maloney Doolan said he had no doubt that Smith was looking for a fight with McLean.

 

 

On this day …….. 31st of January 1953

Keith Murray Hoyes, 27, a married man living with his wife on his father’s dairy form of Cooma, near Kyabram, was killed by lightning on this day in 1953. When a severe thunderstorm struck the district at about 4.30 p.m., Hayes, who had been doing irrigating work, ran to a tree for shelter. When he had not returned to help with the milking at 6 p.m., his father searched for him and found his body underneath the tree, which had been split by lightning. The body was conveyed to the Mooroopna Hospital by ambulance.

 

 

KYABRAM

Tragedy at Kyabram.

FIVE LIVES SACRIFICED.

An appalling domestic tragedy, resulting in the loss of five lives, was enacted at Kyabram early on Saturday morning, when Frank Cooling killed his wife and three of his children with a razor with which he had apparently been shaving, and committed suicide by cutting his throat. A son and a daughter, who were sleeping in the front bedroom, escaped the murderer’s fury. They awoke at the usual time, but waited for their mother to call them. As she did not come, they left their bed, and were confronted with the evidences of the murder. Beside themselves with terror, they ran, horror-stricken, to a neighbours house, and sobbed out the story of the tragedy.

The victims of the tragedy are Frank Cooling, aged 38 years, labourer, Sarah Ann Cooling, his wife, aged 28 years. Alfred John Cooling, son, aged 11 years, Henry James Cooling, son, aged two years, Alexander Francis Cooling, son, aged six weeks.  The two children who escaped are Chrissie aged six years, and Walter, aged 4. There was another child, Alice Mary, aged 9 years, who is in the Echuca Hospital. She had been a patient there for some time and it was the intention of Mr. and Mrs. Cooling to drive to Echuca on Saturday and bring her home. Arrangements had been made with Mr. Tonkin, a neighbour, to attend to the stock while they were away. The family lived in a four-roomed weatherboard cottage in Fernaughty street. They were well known in the district, where Cooling’s father carried on operations as a farmer.