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On This Day – 3rd March 1855

George Coward, colonial assistant surgeon, stated on this day in 1854, that he found the Geelong Gaol (known as Victoria’s Prison of the ill) had considerable difficulty in treating diseases, either mental or bodily, from the want of hospital accommodation. Prisoners, whether of sound or unsound mind, are mingled together, with few exceptions. In diseases of the mind, it is advisable for their proper treatment, that they should be kept separate and not exposed, as they are here, to contract with the prisoners that are daily entering and leaving many of those the most abandoned character. We have at present eight lunatics, two men and six women. We have but five private cells. There are two wards, 16 x 16. There are a number of other female prisoners besides, so that when turned out for exercise, they all meet together, the males only being separated. There is no ward here for diseased prisoners. The deceased, from the nature of her disease, was peculiarly offensive. I am in constant dread of some contagious disease arising in the gaols in this town, and which alone is prevented by the unremitting attention of the superintendent and his subordinates.

 

 

On This Day – 13th February 1862

The situation of chaplain to the Geelong gaols has for many years been worthily filled by the Rev J. C. Handt, a German missionary, who, we believe, received his ordination in the colony. In addition to his labours at the gaols, it has been his duty to attend to the religious wants of Church of England patients at the hospital. Report speaks highly of his earnest, unassuming, truly Christian deportment, and he has performed his duties with all the energetic simplicity. Whether ministering to the hardened criminal working in irons, or giving rights of the disease lying in expectation of the hour of dissolution, he has been equally zealous in the discharge of his trust ; and if winning the esteem of those to whom lie, has ministered be a proof of success, we believe that his services have been beyond all price. Mr Handt has laboured in his vocation as a missionary for some thirty or forty years, twenty-five of which have been spent in this or the neighbouring colonies. His first field was Moreton Bay, where he went out preaching the Gospel among blacks and bushrangers, and ever since has he been working in the same good cause, with but poor reward. This man, now verging on if not exceeding sixty years of age, has for some time found congenial employment in the gaols and charitable institutions of Geelong. His emoluments were just sufficient to supply his simple wants, and he was looking forward to the continuance of his labours among the sick and dying until his own time should come. But it seems that he is doomed to disappointment. He is a man of quiet, un complaining disposition, one who makes no parede of his martyrdom, and we have, accordingly, only learned by accident tho great calamity that has overtaken him. One day not long ago this excellent old man received a letter, a cold, heartless, cruel letter, dismissing him from his situation. The letter was signed, ‘ Your faithful brother , in Christ, C. Melbourne.’ A few days after dismissing this really efficient working clergyman, his Lordship the Bishop told the Assembly of his Church that he would have to go to the world’s fair to bring out clergymen to supply the spiritual destitution of the colony.

 

 

Join the team at Twisted History for a Paranormal Investigation of the Prison of the Ill, at the Old Geelong Gaol. Geelong gaol was built in the 1840 as a hospital gaol for convicts, murders and lunatic.  More deaths have happened at the gaol than any other in Victoria.  Do you have what it takes to explore Victorias most haunted Gaol…… For information and booking please call 1300865800

On This Day – 3rd March 1855

George Coward, colonial assistant surgeon, stated on this say in 1854, that he found the Geelong Gaol (known as Victoria’s Prison of the ill) considerable difficulty in treating diseases, either mental or bodily, from the want of hospital accommodation. Prisoners, whether of sound or unsound mind, are mingled together, with few exceptions. In diseases of the mind, it is advisable for their proper treatment, that they should be kept separate and not exposed, as they are here, to contract with the prisoners that are daily entering and leaving many of those the most abandoned character. We have at present eight lunatics, two men and six women. We have but five private cells. There are two wards, 16 x 16. There are a number of other female prisoners besides, so that when turned out for exercise, they all meet together, the males only being separated. There is no ward here for diseased prisoners. The deceased, from the nature of her disease, was peculiarly offensive. I am in constant dread of some contagious disease arising in the gaols in this town, and which alone is prevented by the unremitting attention of the superintendent and his subordinates.

 

 

On This Day – 13th February 1862

The situation of chaplain to the Geelong gaols has for many years been worthily filled by the Rev J. C. Handt, a German missionary, who, we believe, received his ordination in the colony. In addition to his labours at the gaols, it has been his duty to attend to the religious wants of Church of England patients at the hospital. Report speaks highly of his earnest, unassuming, truly Christian deportment, and he has performed his duties with all the energetic simplicity. Whether ministering to the hardened criminal working in irons, or giving rights of the disease lying in expectation of the hour of dissolution, he has been equally zealous in the discharge of his trust ; and if winning the esteem of those to whom lie, has ministered be a proof of success, we believe that his services have been beyond all price. Mr Handt has laboured in his vocation as a missionary for some thirty or forty years, twenty-five of which have been spent in this or the neighbouring colonies. His first field was Moreton Bay, where he went out preaching the Gospel among blacks and bushrangers, and ever since has he been working in the same good cause, with but poor reward. This man, now verging on if not exceeding sixty years of age, has for some time found congenial employment in the gaols and charitable institutions of Geelong. His emoluments were just sufficient to supply his simple wants, and he was looking forward to the continuance of his labours among the sick and dying until his own time should come. But it seems that he is doomed to disappointment. He is a man of quiet, un complaining disposition, one who makes no parede of his martyrdom, and we have, accordingly, only learned by accident tho great calamity that has overtaken him. One day not long ago this excellent old man received a letter, a cold, heartless, cruel letter, dismissing him from his situation. The letter was signed, ‘ Your faithful brother , in Christ, C. Melbourne.’ A few days after dismissing this really efficient working clergyman, his Lordship the Bishop told the Assembly of his Church that he would have to go to the world’s fair to bring out clergymen to supply the spiritual destitution of the colony.

 

 

GEELONG GAOL HOSPITAL – 1867

The infirmary was a large room containing seven or eight beds, but it is very seldom occupied as the prisoners are too well cared for to get sick. There is, however, one occupant in the form of a poor paralytic old man, who was discharged from the hospital or benevolent asylum, and for the purpose of being sent to gaol was charged with lunacy. Next to the infirmary is a ward room, in which are generally placed lunatics who have become convalescent enough to be trusted with others without fear of danger. Near to these are the surgery, the bathroom, where hot and cold baths are provided for patients, and a few other compartments, for which there is no particular.