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Some Australian bushrangers made their name from martyrdom, others from pure madness. In the case of ‘Mad Dog’ Daniel Morgan, the source of his infamy was definitely the latter. In June of 1864, Morgan shot a bush worker near Albury, New South Wales. He asked another worker to ride for help, then, suspecting the man would ride to the police instead, shot him in the back. Months later, he shot dead a passing police officer just for saying “hello”. In April of 1865, Morgan held up the Peechelba Station near Wangaratta and demanded that the owner’s wife play piano while he ate dinner. Upon leaving the station, he was shot by a stockman and died the following day.

 

Some Australian bushrangers made their name from martyrdom, others from pure madness. In the case of ‘Mad Dog’ Daniel Morgan, the source of his infamy was definitely the latter. In June of 1864, Morgan shot a bush worker near Albury, New South Wales. He asked another worker to ride for help, then, suspecting the man would ride to the police instead, shot him in the back. Months later, he shot dead a passing police officer just for saying “hello”. In April of 1865, Morgan held up the Peechelba Station near Wangaratta and demanded that the owner’s wife play piano while he ate dinner. Upon leaving the station, he was shot by a stockman and died the following day.

 

ON THIS DAY – January 3rd 2013

DESPITE the nickname reporters gave him, Russell “Mad Dog” Cox was cool and calm for a dangerous armed robber – and not without humour. But Australia’s once most-wanted man might not see the funny side of having his name published in newspaper In Memoriam notices yesterday. The apparently harmless notice in the Herald Sun names Cox and his wife, Helen Deane, then states: “You will both be remembered. We will definitely meet again.” It is signed “Mick”, though readers should not assume this means it was placed by colourful Carlton crane hire identity Mick Gatto. But they can assume it is an implied threat. There are two clues. One is that Cox and Deane are alive, in Queensland. The other is the subject of the notice placed directly above the one for Cox and Deane.

 

Some Australian bushrangers made their name from martyrdom, others from pure madness. In the case of ‘Mad Dog’ Daniel Morgan, the source of his infamy was definitely the latter. In June of 1864, Morgan shot a bush worker near Albury, New South Wales. He asked another worker to ride for help, then, suspecting the man would ride to the police instead, shot him in the back. Months later, he shot dead a passing police officer just for saying “hello”. In April of 1865, Morgan held up the Peechelba Station near Wangaratta and demanded that the owner’s wife play piano while he ate dinner. Upon leaving the station, he was shot by a stockman and died the following day.

 

ON THIS DAY – January 3rd 2013

DESPITE the nickname reporters gave him, Russell “Mad Dog” Cox was cool and calm for a dangerous armed robber – and not without humour. But Australia’s once most-wanted man might not see the funny side of having his name published in newspaper In Memoriam notices yesterday. The apparently harmless notice in the Herald Sun names Cox and his wife, Helen Deane, then states: “You will both be remembered. We will definitely meet again.” It is signed “Mick”, though readers should not assume this means it was placed by colourful Carlton crane hire identity Mick Gatto. But they can assume it is an implied threat. There are two clues. One is that Cox and Deane are alive, in Queensland. The other is the subject of the notice placed directly above the one for Cox and Deane.