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ON THIS DAY – January 30, 1952

William O’Meally, 28, labourer, was charged at the City Court with having murdered Constable George Howell, 26, at Caulfield on the 30th of January. On the night in question, Constable George Howell rode his police bicycle to the Crystal Palace Theatre, Dandenong Road, Caulfield. He had been assigned to investigate and prevent numerous thefts from cars which had recently occurred in the vicinity. At about 10.35 pm, Constable Howell intercepted a man interfering with a Morris Minor. According to witnesses, after a struggle the Constable ran after the offender to the far side of a viaduct. The Constable was then shot in the stomach at point blank range with a sawn-off .22 calibre rifle. Although unarmed and mortally wounded, Constable Howell continued to chase the offender. He collapsed in the centre of Normanby Road, and the offender escaped. Although in shock and terrible pain as well as lapsing in and out of consciousness, he was able to give a description of his assailant to citizens who assisted him and to other police who arrived shortly after. Crucially to the later trial, he identified a hat and other items as belonging to the offender. Rushed to the Alfred Hospital for emergency surgery, Constable George Howell died in the early hours of 1st February, 1952. Even at the hospital he attempted to look at a line-up of men and identify his attacker. A skilful investigation primarily based on articles found at the crime scene and information from Constable Howell, led to the arrest and subsequent conviction of a well known and active criminal. Constable George Howell was appointed in May, 1948. He served at Russell Street, Malvern and (since 1949) East Malvern.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – January 27, 1934

Following the finding of the body of a newly born child under a house in Paisley street, Malvern on January 28, a 22-year-old girl was charged in the City Court today with having murdered an infant on January 27. Mr Hauser. P.M. remanded the girl until February 13, and allowed bail in her own recognisance of £200.

ON THIS DAY – July 31, 1922

In the Malvern Police Court Robert Albert Scott, a French polisher, was charged with having, at Malvern, on July 31 shot Marie Dorothy Victoria Frith, a widow, aged 32 years, with intent to murder her.

Marié Dorothy Victoria Frith said that she had known Scott for about 14 months. They had been on friendly terms. On the evening of July 31 she met him by appointment at the Malvern Town Hall, and they walked along High-street until they came to a seat near the reserve at the corner of Edgar-street, where they sat down. In reply to a request by Scott that he should be allowed to continue to meet her witness said : “No, we have talked the matter over before and I am still of the same mind. I do not wish to talk about it any more.” Scott was silent for a few minutes. He then said: “Well if I can’t have you no one will. This ends it.” He drew a revolver and fired at her. The shot missed. Witness ran to the middle of the road. He then pointed the revolver at her face and fired four shots. She put up her left arm to shield her face. She thought that two shots entered her arm. She cried out: “What are you shooting me for? Stop shooting me.”

Witness noticed about half a dozen people standing on the footpath. A carrier’s van passed. The carrier looked out at the side and slowed down, but he passed on. Nobody came to her assistance. Scott said: “What are you making all this fuss about, you silly woman?” He then drew the revolver again and fired about four more shots. . He hit witness three times. One shot was in the left arm, which she had again put up to protect her face. She said to Scott: “You said that you would not shoot again” He said: “I intend to finish you.” Witness tried to run to the road again, but he grabbed her by the hair and threw her to the ground. Scott fired again, the bullet striking witness in the neck. Witness struggled with her arms over her face and another shot struck her in the elbow. She was trying to scream, but could not, as blood was flowing from her mouth freely. Scott took her further down the paddock and sat her down against a fence in a lane, saying: “Now don’t you move.” He then went to look for witness’s hat and glasses, and returned with the hat. Witness felt very weak and was in great pain. She was bleeding freely from the neck and arm. Scott next took her by the arm, and she said “Now let me get home. Will you stop following me any more? Will you stop shooting me?” They walked towards her home and be held her by the arm. She was holding his other hand so that he could not use the revolver. They walked up Tooronga-road to Wattle Tree-road, where witness resides. He said to her: “Will you promise me not to inform the police or tell anyone?” She said: “No, I will not tell the police.” Witness was terrified. He said “Will you meet me on Wednesday night?” Witness said “Yes,” not meaning, however, to keep her promise. He kissed her goodnight and said again. “Will you meet me on Wednesday night?” .She answered “Yes” and then said suddenly “There is your tram,” and left him. Witness complained to Mr and Mrs. M’Call, where she was boarding. Subsequently she was taken to the hospital. Scott was committed for trial.

On This Day – June 25, 1951

A 35-year-old mother charged with the murder of two of her children had suffered three nervous breakdowns and was receiving medical attention, Detective-Sergeant W. Tremewen told the City Court today.

The woman, Mrs Mary Bradley McDonald, of Malvern, is charged with having murdered her seven-year-old daughter. Elizabeth Mary and her eight month-old son David Francis.  Mr McLean, SM. refused her bail and remanded her to July

Detective-Sergeant Tremewen told the court that he found the girl’s body with severe head injuries in a bedroom. A bloodstained tomahawk was nearby, in the bathroom he found the baby boy in a half-filled bath. A preliminary medical inspection showed he had died from drowning.

Witness said Mrs McDonald told him: ‘Ive killed my two children. I wanted them to go to heaven before they had a chance to commit any sins ”

The charges were withdrawn when the mother was certified insane

ON THIS DAY – April 24, 1934

PRAHRAN

CHARGE OF MANSLAUGHTER

A finding of criminal negligence amounting to manslaughter against a motor car driver was recorded by the corner (Mr McLean P M ) at the city morgue. At about 6.45 p m on April 24 in High street Prahran, Charles Duigan Naples, aged 70 years, salesman of High Street, Armadale was knocked down and killed by a motor car driven by John Reuben Beddlson, engineer, of 58 Barclay avenue Malvern. Constable William C Smith in evidence said that after the accident Beddlson smelt strongly of intoxicating liquor and had to catch the handle of the car door to steady himself. Beddlson had to be assisted to the police station and during tests there was unsteady on his feet and thick in his speech Dr R. Miller of High street Armadale said that in his opinion Beddlson, was not in a fit condition to drive a car. Beddlson he said, told him he had had four bottles of beer that afternoon. Beddlson was committed for trial at the Court of General Sessions on July 2 Bail of £150 and a similar surety was granted.

 

ON THIS DAY ……. 9th April 1927

Neville Currey, aged 29 years, manufacturing chemist, was charged with manslaughter in connection with the death of William Charles Lyte on this day in 1927. Evidence was given that Currey was driving a car at Malvern when he knocked down and killed Lyte, who was 60 years of age. After the accident Currey continued on and was pursued for a distance of two miles by another car driven by Miss Florence Mitchell. Currey’s car number was obtained, and he was later arrested by the police. In evidence Currey said that he was unaware of the fact that his car had knocked the old man down. He had a quantity of tackle in the rear of his car, and he suggested that the noise of this rattling had prevented him from hearing the noise of the collision. It was contended by the Crown that Currey was guilty of negligence in not keeping a proper look out when driving. After a brief retirement the jury returned a verdict if not guilty and Currey was discharged.

 

On this day ………… 13th March 1935

While working at a butcher’s shop in Malvern, Melbourne, on this day in 1935, Arthur Venville was accidentally locked in a freezer room by another employee who was unaware that anyone was inside. The man shut the freezer door and closed up the shop at 6pm for the day and was gone by the time Venville realised he was trapped. He bagged on the door and the walls and shouted for help but the freezer walls were so thick. The 20 year old was wearing only a shirt and light pants, but managed to keep warm by jumping, running on the spot, swinging his arms and keeping active by moving meat from one hook to another. In this way Venville remained awake and fought against the numbing cold. He was released from his chilly prison after 11 hours when a delivery man arrived at 5.30am the next day. Venville staggered out of the cold and tired. Later that day he went back to work.

 

 

On this day ………… 5th March 1909

A laborer named William Whale, aged 48 who resided with his son-in-law at 17 Barkly Avenue, Malvern, died in the Alfred Hospital on this day in 1909, from the effects of sun stroke. He was affected about midday while at work on some excavations at Malvern, but was not discovered until several hours later. Then he was unconscious, and Dr. Gillis, who was called to set him, recommended his removal to the hospital. He did not recover and died as above stated.

 

 

On this day ………… 2nd March 1909

A severe accident, befell a young man named Bert Westmore, 26 years of age, a resident of Malvern. Westmore who worked as a shipping clerk for Welch, Perrin and Co., in South Melbourne on this day in 1909 walking in the yard at the rear of the firm’s premises when a kerosene stove, on which some iron was being heated, exploded. Westmore was severely burnt on the face and arms. He was taken in a St. John ambulance to the Melbourne Hospital.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – January 30, 1952

William O’Meally, 28, labourer, was charged at the City Court with having murdered Constable George Howell, 26, at Caulfield on the 30th of January. On the night in question, Constable George Howell rode his police bicycle to the Crystal Palace Theatre, Dandenong Road, Caulfield. He had been assigned to investigate and prevent numerous thefts from cars which had recently occurred in the vicinity. At about 10.35 pm, Constable Howell intercepted a man interfering with a Morris Minor. According to witnesses, after a struggle the Constable ran after the offender to the far side of a viaduct. The Constable was then shot in the stomach at point blank range with a sawn-off .22 calibre rifle. Although unarmed and mortally wounded, Constable Howell continued to chase the offender. He collapsed in the centre of Normanby Road, and the offender escaped. Although in shock and terrible pain as well as lapsing in and out of consciousness, he was able to give a description of his assailant to citizens who assisted him and to other police who arrived shortly after. Crucially to the later trial, he identified a hat and other items as belonging to the offender. Rushed to the Alfred Hospital for emergency surgery, Constable George Howell died in the early hours of 1st February, 1952. Even at the hospital he attempted to look at a line-up of men and identify his attacker. A skilful investigation primarily based on articles found at the crime scene and information from Constable Howell, led to the arrest and subsequent conviction of a well known and active criminal. Constable George Howell was appointed in May, 1948. He served at Russell Street, Malvern and (since 1949) East Malvern.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – January 27, 1934

Following the finding of the body of a newly born child under a house in Paisley street, Malvern on January 28, a 22-year-old girl was charged in the City Court today with having murdered an infant on January 27. Mr Hauser. P.M. remanded the girl until February 13, and allowed bail in her own recognisance of £200.

The Clockface type traffic control signal was designed by Charles Marshall in 1936-37 and manufactured by his manufacturing engineering firm Charles Marshall Pty Ltd, of Fitzroy. This type of signal was used at about 35 Melbourne intersections between the late 1930s and the 1960s. The signal has two large discs, each approximately 3-ft (1 metre) in diameter set at right angles at the top of a 15-ft (4.57 metre) high mast with dial faces on either side of each disc designed to face the oncoming traffic on all four roads at a right-angle crossroad intersection. A large white indicator hand or pointer on each the dial face swept through red, yellow and green sectors of the face to indicate stop and go intervals. The prototype Marshalite unit was installed at the intersection of Gertrude Street and Brunswick Street, Fitzroy, in 1937, at the expense of the company with the permission of the Fitzroy City Council. It lasted only a short period before having to be dismantled after falling foul of the law. A Fitzroy councillor who had been booked for driving against the signals contested his fine in court and won on the grounds that the signals were not the property of the Fitzroy Council and therefore were operating without legal jurisdiction and so where ordered to be removed. The Second World War then intervened hampering further development and it was not until 1945 that a second example was installed (with appropriate approvals) on the corner of Johnson and Brunswick Streets, Fitzroy. Over the next 15 years a number of Marshalite signals were installed at main road intersections in Fitzroy, Clifton Hill, Northcote, Coburg, Richmond, Malvern, Camberwell and along the Neapan Highway through Chelsea. Originally the dials on the Marshalite signals had only green and red sectors, with a rotating indicator lamp instead of the pointer, but later an orange or amber sector was later added at the request of the Traffic Police to give motorists approaching the intersection at speed a warning of the impending change from green to red, and a plain white pointer was used instead of the rotating lamp, with the whole dial illuminated by an overhead lamp at night. Contrary to popular misconception, Marshalite signals always operated in conjuction with more conventional traffic lights positioned on each corner of the intersection, which were connected as slave signals controlled by the operation of the master Marshalite signal, which stood on either in the centre of the intersection or on the most prominent corner. Initially these traffic lights had only two lamps showing green and red, with a third amber lamp added when the intermediate colour was also added to the Marshalite dials.