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On this day …….. 9th of October 1865

An inquest was held at Stieglitz, on this day in 1865, at the Victoria Hotel, on the body of Thomas Hatch.  The deceased a miner at the Sailor’s Reef shaft, Stieglitz was killed when he was jammed between a large rock and the side of the drive. The rock was about five feet in height, and reached to the upper part of deceased’s chest, pressing him closely to the wall.

Witnesses took pickaxes, and examined the drive, and commenced to take the body out by breaking the stone which held him in the position described.

The drive was about four and a half feet by seven feet in length. The stone was black slate and wedge shape, about a ton and a half in weignt, about eighteen inches at the base, and tapering to a point. The thick edge of the stone lay against the back of the deceased.

The body was removed to the cellar of the Victoria Hotel, Molesworth Street, where an autopsy determined a  verdict “Accidental Death, and no blame attachable to the managers of the mine.”

ON THIS DAY ……. 27th March 1892

A miner named Alfred Rogers, residing at Ironbark, whilst working in the stopos of the Golden Age mine at Bendigo Victoria on this day in 1892, sustained a painful injury. A slab came away accidentally and struck him on the head heavily. Dr. Thomas was called to the mine and found that he had a severe scalp wound, which rendered him insensible for some time. The blow had also caused concussion of the brain.

 

 

ON THIS DAY …….. 23rd March 1904

Ballarat

John Davies, a miner, working at the Napoleons mine, near Ballarat was injured on this day in 1904. Davies while being hauled to the surface by a windlass, fell from the bucket to the bottom of the shaft, a distance of 30ft. The accident happened when the rope broke. Davies broke both his legs.

 

 

ON THIS DAY …….. 22nd March 1904

A serious accident happened to a miner named John Norton, at Harrison’s gold mine, Arthur’s Creek on this day in 1904. The man was at the bottom of the shaft, when an ascending bucket fell and struck him with considerable force on the head, inflicting a serious scalp wound.

 

 

On this day ………… 7th March 1861

On this day in 1861, Mr Jones a miner on the Wahgunyah, North East Victoria Gold fields, was halfway up a 220 ft mine shaft when he fell. Normally a fall over 100ft would be followed by instantaneously dead, however Jones not only survived, but sustained only minor injuries. It seems the well dug at the bottom of the shaft to act as a collection point for seepage, was in this mine, covered only by light weatherboards instead of slabs, which slowed Jones fall. Incredibly, this was not the first time for Jones. According to reports in the Federal Standard news paper, it was his second accident within a month.

 

 

ON THIS DAY ……. 27th March 1892

A miner named Alfred Rogers, residing at Ironbark, whilst working in the stopos of the Golden Age mine at Bendigo Victoria on this day in 1892, sustained a painful injury. A slab came away accidentally and struck him on the head heavily. Dr. Thomas was called to the mine and found that he had a severe scalp wound, which rendered him insensible for some time. The blow had also caused concussion of the brain.

 

 

ON THIS DAY …….. 23rd March 1904

Ballarat

John Davies, a miner, working at the Napoleons mine, near Ballarat was injured on this day in 1904. Davies while being hauled to the surface by a windlass, fell from the bucket to the bottom of the shaft, a distance of 30ft. The accident happened when the rope broke. Davies broke both his legs.

 

 

ON THIS DAY …….. 22nd March 1904

A serious accident happened to a miner named John Norton, at Harrison’s gold mine, Arthur’s Creek on this day in 1904. The man was at the bottom of the shaft, when an ascending bucket fell and struck him with considerable force on the head, inflicting a serious scalp wound.

 

 

On this day ………… 7th March 1861

On this day in 1861, Mr Jones a miner on the Wahgunyah, North East Victoria Gold fields, was halfway up a 220 ft mine shaft when he fell. Normally a fall over 100ft would be followed by instantaneously dead, however Jones not only survived, but sustained only minor injuries. It seems the well dug at the bottom of the shaft to act as a collection point for seepage, was in this mine, covered only by light weatherboards instead of slabs, which slowed Jones fall. Incredibly, this was not the first time for Jones. According to reports in the Federal Standard news paper, it was his second accident within a month.