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‘Suspect warned’ before being shot

Jedd Houghton

Jedd Houghton

Police Special Operations Group members had repeatedly told a police shooting suspect to drop his gun before hitting him with three shotgun blasts at close range, the Melbourne Coroner’s Court heard yesterday. Jedd Houghton, 23, died almost instantly during a raid on a caravan park in Bendigo on November 17,1988.  He had been an alleged member of a gang planning an armed robbery and there was a link be tween him and the killing of two constables in Walsh Street, South Yarra, Graeme Morrish, QC, assisting Coroner Hal Hallenstein, said. Mr Morrish said Houghton’s death was linked to that of Graeme Jensen on October 11, 1988, and a shooting the following day when Constables Steven Tynan and Damian Eyre were gunned down while checking an abandoned car.  Jensen, a close associate of Houghton, had been killed while armed robbery squad detectives were trying to arrest him at Narre Warren, the hearing was told. From the outset, due to his association with Jensen, police had considered Houghton a suspect in the killings of the two constables in Walsh Street, Mr Morrish said. Houghton, Jensen, and two other men were believed to be planning an armed robbery, he said. Visual and electronic surveillance had been carried out by the Bureau of Criminal Intelligence of Houghton’s movements in the period leading up to the SOG raid, he said. It had been decided to arrest Houghton as a suspect in the Walsh Street killings. Four SOG members had entered the cabin where Houghton and his girlfriend, Kim Cameron, had been staying, at 12.08pm. Mr Morrish said two had gone for Houghton and the others had placed a hood over Ms Cameron’s head before whisking her away.  Houghton had pointed a gun at SOG member Sergeant Paul Carr and had been repeatedly told 10 drop the weapon, he said. Fearing one of them would be shot, Sergeant Carr and his partner had both fired their pump action shotguns, acting in self defence. The hearing, attended by Houghton’s mother, sister and Ms Cameron, viewed a nine-minute videotape which included graphic footage of the blood-soaked body and horrific wounds.  The cause of death was a shot gun blast fired at a distance of 10cm, hitting him in the chest.  Two other blasts fired from 10cm had hit Houghton in his upper body and arm. Three revolvers and a pistol had been found in the cabin. The hearing continues.

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Join the team at Twisted History in the oldest Chinese community outside of Asia ….. and the most dangerous street in the colony, Little Bourke Street.  Hear about murders, drugs, crime and prostitution from our costumed guides.  Tours run every Friday and Saturday night.  Bookings essential on 130086580012141560_616456475159053_7960983741588420104_n

FIRST EUROPEAN MURDER CONVICTION  IN VICTORIA

SUPREME COURT-CRIMINAL SIDE. SATURDAY. MAY 15. (Before the Resident Judge and a Civil Jury.)

Portland Bay 1841

Portland Bay 1841

Thomas Leahy, cooper, at Portland Town, was then put to the bar, charged with the wilful murder of his wife Sarah Leahy, by having on the 16th of November last wounded her with a bayonet, thereby causing almost instant death.

John Horne, a native of China, sworn after the manner of his own nation, by breaking a plate, stated that he lives at Portland Bay—knows Thomas Leahy the prisoner, and knew his wife—Sarah Leahy is dead now, she was alive eight moons ago—saw no dispute between prisoner and his wife at that time—has seen them “making quarrels”—remembers working on the day of the murder outside the house—heard a noise and ran in—saw prisoner with a bayonet —would know it again—the one produced was the same, or exactly like it —prisoner had it in his hand—saw him stab his wife (describing the manner of the thrust)—she ran out of the back door with her hand up to her breast, and fell outside the house.

Lovel Byus, sworn: lives at Portland Bay, is a surgeon—has seen the prisoner at Portland Bay between six and seven months ago—can’t say if he was married —remembers on the 16th November last being called in to see deceased— in passing Horne’s house heard a scream —did not go in, but was overtaken by a man of the name of Brown—from his information went to the Chinaman’s hut, and there saw a woman lying on the road, and the prisoner standing near her—he said that he would go and deliver himself up, which he did—saw a wound on the deceased’s body on the left side, and examined it—remained with the woman a quarter of an hour— after examining the wound found the woman’s pulse scarcely perceptible— spoke to her, but she was senseless—saw blood upon the bayonet—am certain it was blood—it was a weapon similar to the one produced, and the wound was such as would be produced by such a weapon—the weapon was given to Mr. Blair—had a post mortem examination on the body—found an external triangular wound on the left breast of the deceased, penetrating between the third and fourth ribs to the left ventricle of the heart—it was such a wound as would produce death—I believe that it caused death.

His Honor summed up as briefly as possible; the Jury retired, and after a few minutes returned a verdict of Guilty. The prisoner was then sentenced to be executed,—time and place left to His Excellency the Governor.

 

MURDER IN MELBOURNE.

Death Mask of Freeland Morrell

John Anderson, second mate of the American barque Don Nicholas, was murdered by one of the crew named Freeland Morrell. During the voyage there had been ill blood between the parties, and Morrell had applied for his discharge on the grounds that he could not get on with the mate. Last night Morrell sharpened a knife, and told the cook he was going to do for Anderson. Shortly after this Morrell left the vessel, and meeting Anderson on the pier, stabbed him to the heart, the latter dying immediately. The murderer was instantly arrested. An inquest was held to-day, and a verdict of wilful murder was returned against Freeland Morrell, one of the crew, who was committed for trial.

 

 

JULIET LANE – CHINATOWN

On account of a female, who came from the country, was taking tea with her friend in Juilet Lane, when she became unwell, and said there must be something deleterious in the water tank.

A most disturbing find was made in the water tank behind the building on the 16th November 1859. After guests become unwell at a dinner party, from drinking water, it was decided to look into the tank a brown paper parcel was seen floating on the water, which, on being taken out, created a great stench. Inside of the paper was found the body of a child, wrapped up in calico, with its legs doubled up and tied with a cord. At the inquest it was stated that its skull had been fractured. The jury returned a verdict of ‘ Wilful murder against some person or persons unknown.’

BUNINGYONG

Late last night we received information that a dreadful murder was committed at Buninyong, on the previous day (Monday last) . All the particulars that we have able to collect are, that a person named Jeremiah Connell had called at Mr. Veitch’s Inn, that he went into the kitchen and brought out a poker and, without any previous quarrel or provocation, commenced a murderous onslaught on bystanders. One man had his jaw broken, anotherwas seriously cut on the head, and the deceased, a man named Edward Martin, a servant in the employ of Mr. Veitch, was killed on spot. What the murderer’s motive could have been is a mystery, as he had not even been drinking. He was with difficulty secured, detained in custody, but in the course of the evening he made his escape. Next morning he again secured by the servant of Mr. Learmonth, that gentleman immediately despatched a messenger to Geelong, with a requisition for a mounted policeman to be sent up, and a trooper will accordingly be despatched this morning.

Geelong Advertiser, Nov 18 – [We learn since the above was in type, that the murder, up to latest date, was not complete, the wounded being still in existence, though not expected to survive. The outrage was a genuine Tipperary one, and the only offence given by the victim, is a Scotchman, was a mild remonstrance against the furious language the murderer was using against Orangemen and Protestants in general.]

CARLTON

BABY’S DEATH

MOTHER CHARGED WITH MURDER.

On a charge of having murdered her newly-born baby at Carlton on November 15 Lillian Shore, 22, single of Carlton, was to-day committed for trial by the City Coroner, Mr. Tingate.

The baby was found in the front garden of a house in Carlton with its throat cut and the body was wrapped in newspaper.

Florence Parker, who conducted an apartment house at which Shore was staying, said she did not know Shore had given birth to a child. Shore went to bed early that night and next day had assisted in the housework.

A CHARGE OF MURDER.

An inquest was made on the 14th of November 1902, concerning the death of Michael Wynne, aged 35, who died on the 7th of November from a stab with a knife in the abdomen. The jury found that death was due to a stab inflicted by Patrick Gibbons, who was guilty of wilful murder. Gibbons, who is an elderly man, was committed for trial.

SUSPECTED MURDER.

Body Recovered from Yarra.

VICTORIA AGAIN.

Mysterious circumstances surround the death of Eric Watkins, aged 22, whose body was found in the Yarra on November 13.

Watkins boarded a train at Adelaide on November 6 and was not seen alive afterwards, nor was his luggage found. The police ascertained that he got in association with a number of train “crooks,” who got about £15 from him. It is presumed he is a victim of foul play, and that the body was thrown into the river Yarra close to Spencer-street station.

Aerial view of the crime scene of the Wiseman murders

Glenroy Murder

Aerial view of the crime scene of the Wiseman murders

‘It might well be that when the murderer entered the house no thought of murder was in his mind end that his motive was one of stealing.’ This theory was put forward to-day by the Crown Prosecutor (M’. F. Book), at the trial of a chimney sweep (George Green, 38) who pleaded not guilty to having murdered an aged woman and her niece. The victims were Annie Wiseman (62) and Phyllis Wiseman (17), who were found strangled in their lonely home at Glenroy on November 13.

Detectives examining crime scene

Detectives examining crime scene

‘Two innocent, inoffensive women were killed in their own bedrooms, apparently by a man who intruded into the house some time during the night to steal,’ said Mr. Book, ‘but it ‘s clear from the evidence that he did not hesitate to kill both women in the course of the commission of that criminal offence.’ The trial is part heard.

FURTHER REMAND

Double Murder Case

On a charge of having murdered Annie Constance Wiseman, 62, and her niece, Phyllis Wiseman, 17, at Glenroy, on November 12, George Green, 42. of West Heidelberg, was remanded in the City Court to-day to December 19. Miss Wiseman and her niece were found strangled in Miss Wiseman’s home on November 13. The inquest into their deaths will be held on December 19.