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All the Rivers Run II is an Crawford Production television 2 part miniseries which aired on Channel Seven on the 18th of March 1990.

Starring John Waters and actress Nikki Coghill who replaced Sigrid Thornton in the leading role.

The miniseries follows on where Nancy Cato 1958 novel, Australian historical finishes. The series was directed by John Power. 

Series II takes up the story of Delie (Nikki Coghill) and Brenton Edwards (John Waters) at the turn of the century, at a moment when bad times have struck the once thriving river boat trade.

New roads and railway lines threaten the very existence of the grand old paddle steamers of the Murray and striking shearers threaten the lives of their crews.

Into the explosive situation walks Cyrus James (Parker Stevenson), a charming, but mysterious overseas entrepreneur. He is immediately attracted to Delie, but backs off when he encounters Brenton.

The three become close to friends. Trying to mediate in the dispute between the shearers and the riverboat skippers, Brenton is framed on a charge of seriously injuring a local businessman Arthur Blackwell (Tim Robertson).

He is sentenced to imprisonment in Melbourne.  Without Brenton, Delie is faced with a custody battle over her children and the not altogether unwanted attentions of Cyrus. 

Alone she must fight to keep her family and the riverboat “Philadelphia”.  In a desperate attempt to help her, Brenton escapes. When trying to reach his children, a waiting policeman, the same man in the employ of the wealthy squatters who framed Brenton in the first place, shoots Brenton. 

Brenton disappears in the murky waters of the swollen River Murray, leaving only a trail of blood behind.  All the Rivers Run II has all the romance, adventure and even more intrigue than its internationally successful predecessor.

The series was shot on location in Echuca as well as locations in Melbourne.  The paddle steamer PS Pevensey was filmed as the PS Philadelphia. 

visit www.twistedhistory.net.au

On this day ……… 30th of May 1953 

Homicide squad detectives investigating the Mildura “Pyjama Man” murder have taken possession of a 12in. iron bar. Senior-detective N. Wilby and Detective E. Miller found the bar when they went to Mildura to investigate fresh reports by local police. The bar will be examined by police scientific experts in Melbourne later this week. An aborigine told police he saw a man hide the bar in bushes a few weeks, after the murder of Milan Hlavenka, 32, Czechoslovakian student. Hlavenka was battered to death and robbed of £8/8/ while he slept, dressed in pyjamas, in a sleeping bag on the banks of the Murray near Mildura on May 30. Detectives Wilby and Miller interviewed several aborigines at the weekend.

 

On this day …….. 13th of October 1836

The first white burial in North East Victoria took place on this day in 1836. James “Tally Ho” Taylor, a member of Major Mitchell’s expedition, drowned in the Broken River. The Major and his party were returning north after traversing the Port Phillip district between the Murray and Portland. As they prepared to cross the Broken River, Tally Ho, who was a groom and bugler to the party, rode into the stream to find a suitable crossing, but drown. He was buried between sheets of bark on the bank of the river.

 

On this day …….. 17th September 1853

In 1828-29, Captain Charles Sturt became the first explorer to follow the course of the Murray River down to its mouth at Lake Alexandrina in South Australia. In doing so, he opened up the possibilities for a new means of transporting goods and passengers through inland NSW to the southern coast. In 1851, the South Australian Government offered 2,000 pounds reward to the first two steamships to reach the junction of the Murray and Darling Rivers. 31-year-old Scottish shipbuilder, Francis Cadell, had the 32m iron paddlesteamer, ‘Lady Augusta’, built in Sydney with 2x20hp steam engines. He departed Goolwa on 25 August 1853, travelling 2,200 km upstream, reaching Swan Hill on 17 September 1853. Cadell’s competitor, William Randell, built his own 17m paddlesteamer ‘Mary Ann’ at Gumeracha and Mannum, with a single 8hp engine and a square boiler. Randell reached Swan Hill several hours behind Cadell, after the two had raced neck-and-neck most of the way. Cadell went on to carry cargo mostly along the Murray and Murrumbidgee Rivers; the small Murray River town of Cadell in South Australia now bears his name. Randell plied his trade along the Murray-Darling system. The town of Mannum grew up around his boat-yards and docks at his Reedy Creek station.

 

On this day …….. 5th September 1949

A strange creature reportedly seen in the Murray River, Mildura on this day in 1949, may have been a trained seal or sea-lion. One escaped from a travelling menagerie in Wangaratta about two years earlier, and was believed to have slipped into a river.

 

On this day …….. 30th of August 1938

Evelyn Marsden, was born on the 15th of October 1883, at Stockyard Creek about 80 km north of Adelaide, in South Australia. As a youth, she learned to row a boat against the tides and currents of the Murray River while visiting a farm at Murray Bridge, South Australia. Marsden was the only Australian female survivor of the sinking of the Titanic and was rescued in lifeboat 16. After the Titanic disaster She returned to that farm to thank the family for teaching her to row and handle a boat properly. Following the Titanic she married Dr William Abel James, who had worked for the White Star Line and moved to Bondi, Sydney, where my husband continued work as a Doctor. Marsden died on the 30th of August 1938, with my husband passing away soon after and we are both buried at Waverley Cemetery, Sydney. We had no children.

 

On this day ……… 30th of May 1953 

Homicide squad detectives investigating the Mildura “Pyjama Man” murder have taken possession of a 12in. iron bar. Senior-detective N. Wilby and Detective E. Miller found the bar when they went to Mildura to investigate fresh reports by local police. The bar will be examined by police scientific experts in Melbourne later this week. An aborigine told police he saw a man hide the bar in bushes a few weeks, after the murder of Milan Hlavenka, 32, Czechoslovakian student. Hlavenka was battered to death and robbed of £8/8/ while he slept, dressed in pyjamas, in a sleeping bag on the banks of the Murray near Mildura on May 30. Detectives Wilby and Miller interviewed several aborigines at the weekend.

 

On this day …….. 18th May 1854

Victoria is generally accepted as the first place in Australia to have had a completed railway line. The first steam train in Australia made its maiden voyage on the 12th of September 1854, running between Flinders Street and Sandridge, now Port Melbourne. However, the first railway ever to run in Australia was actually in South Australia. South Australia was one of only two Australian states to have been founded by free settlers (the other being Western Australia), and the only state that remained entirely free of convicts during its early history. Its capital city, Adelaide, was designed by Colonel William Light, who arrived in South Australia in 1836. The southern colony quickly grew, fed by immigrants and free settlers in search of a better life or escaping religious persecution. South Australia was known for a number of “firsts”. It was the site where Australia’s first paddlesteamer was launched. It was the site from which both the first east to west crossing and successful south to north crossing of the continent was undertaken. It was also the first colony to implement a railway. South Australia began operations of horse-drawn trains on the 18th of May 1854. The line ran from Goolwa, on the Murray River, to the harbour at Port Elliot, and was used to move supplies between craft navigating the Murray River, and coastal and ocean-going vessels. After numerous vessels were shipwrecked at the entrance to the bay, the terminus was moved from Port Elliot and the line extended to Victor Harbor, in 1864.

On this day …….. 5th May 1851

Mr F. Gerstacker an early explorer of North East Victoria, set sail on this day in 1851, in a gum tree canoe from Albury, heading for the sea. The intrepid mariner managed to cover about 30 miles before he sank, somewhat short of his goal. It would be three years before the first river boat would make it up the Murray River from South Australia.

 

On this day …….. 4th May 1878

On this day in 1878, Henry Audin attached a locally made telephone to the telegraph wire and sent a message across the border (Murray River) to Wahgunyah through Chiltern and Wodonga to arrive in Albury in the blink of an eye.  The listener at the other end of the phone heard the word …………. Cooeeee. This was the second interstate phone to ever be made. The first inter state phone call to be made was done three months earlier by Mr. McGuaran manager of the Albury telegraph office to Mr Cheyne of the Wodonga telegraph office.

On this day ………… 27th February 1868

As earthquake go, it wasn’t all that big, lasting only four or five seconds, but there was much shaking of building and rattling of crockery and a distant rumbling, on this day in 1868. The shock waves, which appeared to move in a north to south direction, were felt in most parts of the North East Victoria – Beechworth, Stanley, Chiltern and Wangaratta all reported tremor. Old hands weren’t overly disturbed by the incident, particularly those having experienced an earlier earthquake which rolled across from the Campaspe to the Murray in 1858. It caughtMr. maiden rowing across the river near present day Moama, and, according to stories at the time, the tidal wave generated by the quake almost overturned his boat.

 

 

On this day ………… 4th February 1939

The indigenous people of Australia were the original inhabitants of the Australian continent. Ever since Europeans first settled the continent, Australian history has been dotted with instances of injustices against the native people. As European settlement spread, more and more Aborigines were displaced from their traditional home. They were dispossessed of their land and, due to the hostilities between whites and Aborigines, they were moved onto reserves and missions, where they were supposed to be protected. The Cummeragunja Mission in southern New South Wales was one such mission, established in 1881, primarily for the Yorta Yorta people who inhabited the land just north of the Murray River near Barmah, Victoria. Many of the Yorta Yorta had been relocated from the strictly religious Maloga Mission, and were permitted to live more self-sufficiently on Cummeragunja, establishing a farm and producing wheat, wool and dairy products. In 1915, the New South Wales Aboriginal Protection Board took over control of Cummeragunja, disbanding the farm’s committee of management, meaning that the residents no longer had control over funds they raised from their work on the farm. Conditions for the residents became far more restrictive, and a system of distributing rations was implemented. These rations were unhealthy and insufficient, other supplies were minimal, and shelter was inferior. By the 1930s, illness was rife throughout the mission. On 4 February 1939, between 150 and 200 indigenous residents staged a mass walk-off in protest against the deplorable living conditions. They crossed the border into Victoria, which was against the rules of the New South Wales Protection Board. Many of them subsequently settled in towns such as Barmah, Echuca and Shepparton. No further action was taken on behalf of the aboriginal people’s claims for compensation, and little has been taken in recent years. At most, the Yorta Yorta people have received about one tenth of 1 percent of the traditional lands they lost to European settlement.