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ON THIS DAY …….. 29th March 1955

MYRTLEFORD

An ambulance was used as a court, when Stanislaus Bartosz was remanded on a charge of murder. Bartosz a 40 year old Polish tobacco farmer. As the ambulance stood in the yard at Russell Street Police Headquarters, the Judge stood alongside it, and an interpreter relayed proceedings to Bartosz, who lay inside. He was brought to Melbourne just before the Court, from Myrtleford, where he is alleged to have shot another farmer, and then attempted to commit suicide, on this day in 1955.

 

ON THIS DAY ……. 28th March 1934

The residents of Myrtleford, North East Victoria, turned out on this day in 1934, to see Mrs L. Diffey, wife of the district parliamentarian cut the ribbon outside the Myrtleford power station. The town then watch in ore as electric power to the town was officially turned on.

 

 

On this day ………… 28th February 1932

“Myrtleford, in the Mount Buffalo district of North East Victoria, has a mysterious animal, which stands like a human being, and is described as being 7ft high, with a large round hairy head, carrying four tusks. Search parties tried to capture the creature, but an all-night search failed to locate it. That the animal does exist and that it is savage is vouched for by Mr. William Nutall of Myrtleford. “He was returning home from Brighton with his sister and a companion, when, nearing Europa railway station, he alighted from his horse to adjust the saddle gear, the others riding on. Suddenly, he said, he was attacked by the strange animal. It snarled at him and charged, tearing his shirt to ribbons.” While the startled rider’s horse managed to break free, poor Nutall was chased onto the railway line. Luckily, for Nutall, the animal was prevented from continuing the pursuit by a wire fence, through which the terrified man made good his escape.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – FEBRUARY 14, 1874

James Fagan was well known as the proprietor of the Water Right Hotel, located on the corner of Mellish Street and the Myrtleford road, Beechworth. On the 14th of February, whilst standing in the door of his Hotel, Mr. Fagan was struck by a man later identified as James Adams. It is reported that Adams approached Mr. Fagan and struck him violently with a large stone on the forehead. On the 19th of February, five days after the attack an operation was carried out in the Ovens District Hospital, Beechworth, as a last resort to save Fagan from his injuries. However this was unsuccessful and he slipped into an unconscious state and died on the 21st February 1874. James Adams was later committed to trial where he was found not guilty after a lengthy deliberation by the jury.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – February 10, 1907

An apparent attempt at murder took place at North Prentice, 5km from Rutherglen, on this day in 1907. Joseph Deane, with his wife and family (two children, about 5 and 3 years of age), arrived at Rutherglen from Myrtleford, and put up at the Shamrock Hotel. The following day they visited the residence of Deane’s brother-in-law, McNeill and after being at McNeill’s for some time Deane noticed a pea rifle, and said he would have a shot. He was advised not to do so, as it was against the law on Sunday. Deane persisted, and placed a cartridge in the rifle. Mrs. Deane went into one of the bedrooms, and Deane followed her. Shortly afterwards McNeill heard a scream and the report of a rifle. He rushed to the door and met Deane who exclaimed, “Oh, shoot me.” McNeill took the rifle away, and Deane ran into the yard. McNeill went to the bedroom and found Mrs. Deane on the floor with blood flowing from a wound in her head, the bullet having entered behind one of the ears and passed through the jawbone. A neighbour discovered Deane in the corner shed with a gash in his throat. Deane and his wife were removed to the Corowa Hospital, New South Wales, the woman recovery, but Deane died. When Deane and his wife arrived at McNeill’s they appeared to be on very friendly terms, but Deane seemed worried. He said that he had a little trouble, conveying the idea that it was domestic trouble.

 

 

On this day …….. 11th of January 1903

Stephen Stone, alias Wilson, a prisoner in the Beechworth Gaol, serving a sentence of nine months’ imprisonment for larceny, was on this day in 1903, conveyed to Wahgunyah to answer a charge of housebreaking and was committed for trial. Constable Paul was bringing Stone to the Beechworth Gaol, when, about four miles from Beechworth, as the train was ascending the big hill at a slow speed, the prisoner got out of a carriage window and escaped. On the arrival of the train Paul reported the matter, and the local police went out to search the district. Other police stations were also promptly notified. Constable Cahill, of Myrtleford, happened to be driving from Eldorado to Everton, when he espied a man in prison clothes hiding behind a tree. Cahill went after him, and having secured the prisoner conveyed him to Everton, whence he was brought on by train to Beechworth.

 

ON THIS DAY …….. 29th March 1955

MYRTLEFORD

An ambulance was used as a court, when Stanislaus Bartosz was remanded on a charge of murder. Bartosz a 40 year old Polish tobacco farmer. As the ambulance stood in the yard at Russell Street Police Headquarters, the Judge stood alongside it, and an interpreter relayed proceedings to Bartosz, who lay inside. He was brought to Melbourne just before the Court, from Myrtleford, where he is alleged to have shot another farmer, and then attempted to commit suicide, on this day in 1955.

 

ON THIS DAY ……. 28th March 1934

The residents of Myrtleford, North East Victoria, turned out on this day in 1934, to see Mrs L. Diffey, wife of the district parliamentarian cut the ribbon outside the Myrtleford power station. The town then watch in ore as electric power to the town was officially turned on.

 

 

On this day ………… 29th February 1934

An intensive search by armed horsemen started on this day in 1934, for a mystery animal, which has been terrorising the mountain districts between Bright and Yackandandah, in North East Victoria, proved fruitless. The marauder made its last appearance near Myrtleford. The townspeople are alarmed and declare that they will not rest until he is laid by the heels. He has appeared four times since early in February. Twice he has attacked horsemen and once leapt at a jinker in which two men were driving. The animal is believed by zoo authorities, judging from footprints, to be a small American black bear, which has probably escaped from a travelling circus.

 

 

On this day ………… 28th February 1932

“Myrtleford, in the Mount Buffalo district of North East Victoria, has a mysterious animal, which stands like a human being, and is described as being 7ft high, with a large round hairy head, carrying four tusks. Search parties tried to capture the creature, but an all-night search failed to locate it. That the animal does exist and that it is savage is vouched for by Mr. William Nutall of Myrtleford. “He was returning home from Brighton with his sister and a companion, when, nearing Europa railway station, he alighted from his horse to adjust the saddle gear, the others riding on. Suddenly, he said, he was attacked by the strange animal. It snarled at him and charged, tearing his shirt to ribbons.” While the startled rider’s horse managed to break free, poor Nutall was chased onto the railway line. Luckily, for Nutall, the animal was prevented from continuing the pursuit by a wire fence, through which the terrified man made good his escape.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – FEBRUARY 14, 1874

James Fagan was well known as the proprietor of the Water Right Hotel, located on the corner of Mellish Street and the Myrtleford road, Beechworth. On the 14th of February, whilst standing in the door of his Hotel, Mr. Fagan was struck by a man later identified as James Adams. It is reported that Adams approached Mr. Fagan and struck him violently with a large stone on the forehead. On the 19th of February, five days after the attack an operation was carried out in the Ovens District Hospital, Beechworth, as a last resort to save Fagan from his injuries. However this was unsuccessful and he slipped into an unconscious state and died on the 21st February 1874. James Adams was later committed to trial where he was found not guilty after a lengthy deliberation by the jury.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – February 10, 1907

An apparent attempt at murder took place at North Prentice, 5km from Rutherglen, on this day in 1907. Joseph Deane, with his wife and family (two children, about 5 and 3 years of age), arrived at Rutherglen from Myrtleford, and put up at the Shamrock Hotel. The following day they visited the residence of Deane’s brother-in-law, McNeill and after being at McNeill’s for some time Deane noticed a pea rifle, and said he would have a shot. He was advised not to do so, as it was against the law on Sunday. Deane persisted, and placed a cartridge in the rifle. Mrs. Deane went into one of the bedrooms, and Deane followed her. Shortly afterwards McNeill heard a scream and the report of a rifle. He rushed to the door and met Deane who exclaimed, “Oh, shoot me.” McNeill took the rifle away, and Deane ran into the yard. McNeill went to the bedroom and found Mrs. Deane on the floor with blood flowing from a wound in her head, the bullet having entered behind one of the ears and passed through the jawbone. A neighbour discovered Deane in the corner shed with a gash in his throat. Deane and his wife were removed to the Corowa Hospital, New South Wales, the woman recovery, but Deane died. When Deane and his wife arrived at McNeill’s they appeared to be on very friendly terms, but Deane seemed worried. He said that he had a little trouble, conveying the idea that it was domestic trouble.