Posts

ON THIS DAY – July 5, 1894 

A short account was given last week of the supposed murder of a young woman named Minnie Hicks, aged 23, by Frederick Jordan, negro wharf labourer. She kept house for Jordan and Albert Johnson, at Sydney-place, and was last seen alive at the house occupied by a glassblower named Charles Turnbull and his mistress. This was at midnight on July 5. Next morning Jordan reported to the police that he had found her dead at 7 a.m. in the room he himself slept in, and he had no knowledge how she arrived there. Turnbull, however, put a different complexion on the case, stating that Jordan came to his place after the woman, found her tipsy, began beating her, and when remonstrated with dragged her off home. An examination of the body showed that she had died from the effects of severe beating about the head and body. It has since transpired that Minnie Hicks was married in 1888, at the age of 17, to a man now living at St. Kilda. They parted about 1890, through the wife taking to drink, and she left their one child with the father. About two years ago she took up with Jordan, who was often cruel to her. On the night preceding the fatality Jordan was hunting round the hotels for her, in the company of Charles Champ, wharf labourer, until nearly midnight. They then separated at Champ’s house, and Jordon went off to Turnbulls where he found the woman. The police in examining the premises discovered in the same room as the body a pair of trousers which were blood stained and torn. At the inquest on Tuesday Johnson gave evidence. All he knew was that on Thursday, July 5, Jordan told him not to give the woman money, as she would be sure to spend it on drink. In the afternoon she got 6s. from him to buy provisions for tea and came back with them, after which she left. Other witnesses showed that Jordan went to several public houses looking for the girl, who had got her friends to promise not to tell-of her whereabouts. Jordan ultimately found her at midnight and dragged her home. The man she married six years ago, Henry Crabtree, labourer, St. Kilda, said that she left him in November, 1891, having become a confirmed drunkard. He was a teetotaller. It appears that after being some time with Jordan, Minnie Hicks had shown a liking for another negro named Adam, and stayed with him. The society of the locality was proved to be anything but nice, and one or two of the women called owned to having been drinking with Minnie. The jury found that Jordan had committed wilful murder.

On This Day – November 10, 1909

THE NEGRO KING AGAIN TROUBLESOME. ATTEMPTED MURDER.

In the Criminal Court to-day William King, a negro, was charged with having on November 10, 1909 feloniously wounded Alfred George Curtis, a warder at Pentridge, with intent to murder him. Evidence was given by several warders that when Curtis entered King’s cell with the object or removing aim to another part of the prison King stabbed him in several places. Accused said the wardens’ accounts of the occurrence were not correct. On the morning in question Curtis, Quick, Cronin, and two other big warders, one named Bourke, and another he did not know, came to his cell. They got him down, and beat him about the head several times. Curtis struck him, and then he used his knife: Witness had absolutely no personal feeling against. Curtis, and had no intention to murder him or any of them. He was very weak that morning, and was suffering from severe pains in his chest. He had been suffering for months. He had a knife concealed on his person for a week. He need it to cut his food and tobacco. He drew the knife and used it on the warders to fight them rather than go to A Division where he knew he would hare been treated worse than the pigs of the place. He would rather be hanged than stay in prison for the rest of his life. The jury returned a verdict of guilty of unlawfully wounding, and accused was remanded for sentence.

ON THIS DAY…… 11th August 1873

 

A shocking outrage was committed by the American black named James Wallace, at Mount Beckwith, on Friday last. Mrs Mary Cook, the wife of a contractor and farmer well known throughout the Talbot district, was at home with her three children on the morning of the 4th instant. Her husband was away on business, and there were no male or female servants about the house, which is situated some distance from any other farm or dwelling-place. Shortly after ten o’clock a man entered, and “stuck up'” the premises. He was disguised by a bran bag wrapped about his head, and a sack over his body, but his accent and his hands betrayed him to be a negro. He asked Mrs Cook for money, but she told him there was none in the house. He then took a double-barrelled gun from over the mantel piece, and having driven the children into an adjoining room and locked them in, the brutal ruffian returned with a butcher’s knife in his hand. With this murderous weapon at the throat of Mrs Cook he pushed the poor woman into her bedroom, thrust her upon the bed, and committed a capital offence. He then made off, and although information was given to the police, he made good his escape from the Talbot district— calling at Kangaroo Flat, and obtaining from Edwards’ store a supply of heavy shot, a flask of powder, and some caps. He was tracked towards Lexton, where his clue was lost.

The police all round the country were on the alert, and on Monday information was received that the “nigger” had been seen on the Ararat road, and that he had stuck up and robbed several men, taking £6 17s from one of his victims. He also fired at, with intent to kill, a Mr. Prentice, near the cutting at the Big Hill beyond Beaufort. Hearing of this, Senior- constable Woods, now stationed at Beaufort, but recently of the Ballarat force, disguised himself as a digger and went out in search of his man. About eight o’clock in the evening his errand proved successful, for he saw Wallace making some purchases in a store. Before the negro had time to use the butcher’s knife—which he still carried with him—Woods was upon him, and after a struggle, the negro was secured and held till another constable arrived, and the desperado was lodged in the Beaufort lock-up. He had planted the gun in the bush before he entered the store, but there is no doubt that the weapon will be found. It seems that the prisoner was only released from Pentridge on the 24th of June, where he had suffered two years imprisonment for larceny from a dwelling. The man he shot at (Mr. Prentice) and Mr. Kelly, landlord of the Telegraph Junction Hotel, were the principal witnesses against him at that time, when he swore that he would have Kelly’s life as soon as he came out. Since his arrest he says he was on his way to Kelly’s to carry his threat into execution, and he would have shot Prentice too if his aim had been sure. He said he would have stuck up the Pleasant, Creek coach on Monday, only he thought there was a trooper on the box.

The wretch seems perfectly indifferent to his fate, for, when rolling up his blankets in the lock-up yesterday morning, he jocosely said, “I feel very stiff, but I suppose it don’t matter; I’ll be stiffer very soon” —no doubt making a truthful prophecy of his approaching end by the hangman.

ON THIS DAY – July 5, 1894 

A short account was given last week of the supposed murder of a young woman named Minnie Hicks, aged 23, by Frederick Jordan, negro wharf labourer. She kept house for Jordan and Albert Johnson, at Sydney-place, and was last seen alive at the house occupied by a glassblower named Charles Turnbull and his mistress. This was at midnight on July 5. Next morning Jordan reported to the police that he had found her dead at 7 a.m. in the room he himself slept in, and he had no knowledge how she arrived there. Turnbull, however, put a different complexion on the case, stating that Jordan came to his place after the woman, found her tipsy, began beating her, and when remonstrated with dragged her off home. An examination of the body showed that she had died from the effects of severe beating about the head and body. It has since transpired that Minnie Hicks was married in 1888, at the age of 17, to a man now living at St. Kilda. They parted about 1890, through the wife taking to drink, and she left their one child with the father. About two years ago she took up with Jordan, who was often cruel to her. On the night preceding the fatality Jordan was hunting round the hotels for her, in the company of Charles Champ, wharf labourer, until nearly midnight. They then separated at Champ’s house, and Jordon went off to Turnbulls where he found the woman. The police in examining the premises discovered in the same room as the body a pair of trousers which were blood stained and torn. At the inquest on Tuesday Johnson gave evidence. All he knew was that on Thursday, July 5, Jordan told him not to give the woman money, as she would be sure to spend it on drink. In the afternoon she got 6s. from him to buy provisions for tea and came back with them, after which she left. Other witnesses showed that Jordan went to several public houses looking for the girl, who had got her friends to promise not to tell-of her whereabouts. Jordan ultimately found her at midnight and dragged her home. The man she married six years ago, Henry Crabtree, labourer, St. Kilda, said that she left him in November, 1891, having become a confirmed drunkard. He was a teetotaller. It appears that after being some time with Jordan, Minnie Hicks had shown a liking for another negro named Adam, and stayed with him. The society of the locality was proved to be anything but nice, and one or two of the women called owned to having been drinking with Minnie. The jury found that Jordan had committed wilful murder.

On This Day – November 10, 1909

THE NEGRO KING AGAIN TROUBLESOME. ATTEMPTED MURDER.

In the Criminal Court to-day William King, a negro, was charged with having on November 10, 1909 feloniously wounded Alfred George Curtis, a warder at Pentridge, with intent to murder him. Evidence was given by several warders that when Curtis entered King’s cell with the object or removing aim to another part of the prison King stabbed him in several places. Accused said the wardens’ accounts of the occurrence were not correct. On the morning in question Curtis, Quick, Cronin, and two other big warders, one named Bourke, and another he did not know, came to his cell. They got him down, and beat him about the head several times. Curtis struck him, and then he used his knife: Witness had absolutely no personal feeling against. Curtis, and had no intention to murder him or any of them. He was very weak that morning, and was suffering from severe pains in his chest. He had been suffering for months. He had a knife concealed on his person for a week. He need it to cut his food and tobacco. He drew the knife and used it on the warders to fight them rather than go to A Division where he knew he would hare been treated worse than the pigs of the place. He would rather be hanged than stay in prison for the rest of his life. The jury returned a verdict of guilty of unlawfully wounding, and accused was remanded for sentence.

ON THIS DAY…… 11th August 1873

 

A shocking outrage was committed by the American black named James Wallace, at Mount Beckwith, on Friday last. Mrs Mary Cook, the wife of a contractor and farmer well known throughout the Talbot district, was at home with her three children on the morning of the 4th instant. Her husband was away on business, and there were no male or female servants about the house, which is situated some distance from any other farm or dwelling-place. Shortly after ten o’clock a man entered, and “stuck up'” the premises. He was disguised by a bran bag wrapped about his head, and a sack over his body, but his accent and his hands betrayed him to be a negro. He asked Mrs Cook for money, but she told him there was none in the house. He then took a double-barrelled gun from over the mantel piece, and having driven the children into an adjoining room and locked them in, the brutal ruffian returned with a butcher’s knife in his hand. With this murderous weapon at the throat of Mrs Cook he pushed the poor woman into her bedroom, thrust her upon the bed, and committed a capital offence. He then made off, and although information was given to the police, he made good his escape from the Talbot district— calling at Kangaroo Flat, and obtaining from Edwards’ store a supply of heavy shot, a flask of powder, and some caps. He was tracked towards Lexton, where his clue was lost.

The police all round the country were on the alert, and on Monday information was received that the “nigger” had been seen on the Ararat road, and that he had stuck up and robbed several men, taking £6 17s from one of his victims. He also fired at, with intent to kill, a Mr. Prentice, near the cutting at the Big Hill beyond Beaufort. Hearing of this, Senior- constable Woods, now stationed at Beaufort, but recently of the Ballarat force, disguised himself as a digger and went out in search of his man. About eight o’clock in the evening his errand proved successful, for he saw Wallace making some purchases in a store. Before the negro had time to use the butcher’s knife—which he still carried with him—Woods was upon him, and after a struggle, the negro was secured and held till another constable arrived, and the desperado was lodged in the Beaufort lock-up. He had planted the gun in the bush before he entered the store, but there is no doubt that the weapon will be found. It seems that the prisoner was only released from Pentridge on the 24th of June, where he had suffered two years imprisonment for larceny from a dwelling. The man he shot at (Mr. Prentice) and Mr. Kelly, landlord of the Telegraph Junction Hotel, were the principal witnesses against him at that time, when he swore that he would have Kelly’s life as soon as he came out. Since his arrest he says he was on his way to Kelly’s to carry his threat into execution, and he would have shot Prentice too if his aim had been sure. He said he would have stuck up the Pleasant, Creek coach on Monday, only he thought there was a trooper on the box.

The wretch seems perfectly indifferent to his fate, for, when rolling up his blankets in the lock-up yesterday morning, he jocosely said, “I feel very stiff, but I suppose it don’t matter; I’ll be stiffer very soon” —no doubt making a truthful prophecy of his approaching end by the hangman.

ON THIS DAY – July 5, 1894 

A short account was given last week of the supposed murder of a young woman named Minnie Hicks, aged 23, by Frederick Jordan, negro wharf labourer. She kept house for Jordan and Albert Johnson, at Sydney-place, and was last seen alive at the house occupied by a glassblower named Charles Turnbull and his mistress. This was at midnight on July 5. Next morning Jordan reported to the police that he had found her dead at 7 a.m. in the room he himself slept in, and he had no knowledge how she arrived there. Turnbull, however, put a different complexion on the case, stating that Jordan came to his place after the woman, found her tipsy, began beating her, and when remonstrated with dragged her off home. An examination of the body showed that she had died from the effects of severe beating about the head and body. It has since transpired that Minnie Hicks was married in 1888, at the age of 17, to a man now living at St. Kilda. They parted about 1890, through the wife taking to drink, and she left their one child with the father. About two years ago she took up with Jordan, who was often cruel to her. On the night preceding the fatality Jordan was hunting round the hotels for her, in the company of Charles Champ, wharf labourer, until nearly midnight. They then separated at Champ’s house, and Jordon went off to Turnbulls where he found the woman. The police in examining the premises discovered in the same room as the body a pair of trousers which were blood stained and torn. At the inquest on Tuesday Johnson gave evidence. All he knew was that on Thursday, July 5, Jordan told him not to give the woman money, as she would be sure to spend it on drink. In the afternoon she got 6s. from him to buy provisions for tea and came back with them, after which she left. Other witnesses showed that Jordan went to several public houses looking for the girl, who had got her friends to promise not to tell-of her whereabouts. Jordan ultimately found her at midnight and dragged her home. The man she married six years ago, Henry Crabtree, labourer, St. Kilda, said that she left him in November, 1891, having become a confirmed drunkard. He was a teetotaller. It appears that after being some time with Jordan, Minnie Hicks had shown a liking for another negro named Adam, and stayed with him. The society of the locality was proved to be anything but nice, and one or two of the women called owned to having been drinking with Minnie. The jury found that Jordan had committed wilful murder.