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On this day …….. 20th of August 1857

Irishman James Johnson the sole survivor of the Dunbar which was wrecked near the entrance to Sydney Harbour on 20th August 1857 with the loss of 121 lives. Nine years later, help by two other men, Johnson was responsible for rescuing the sole survivor of the Cawarra which was wrecked off Newcastle on 12th July 1866 with the loss of 61 lives.

 

A sea creature, thought to be a giant pike eel, washed up on the banks of Lake Macquarie at Swansea, NSW on the 15th of February 2016. But is it a terrifying creature from the deep, or is the whole thing a bit fishy? Newcastle dad Ethan Tipper reportedly posted the photo to Facebook asking friends, “what the f—k is this?”, the Daily Telegraph reports. He had reportedly spotted the creature and taken the photo. The post has reportedly been shared more than 1000 times. Australian museum ichthyology manager Mark McGrouther told the newspaper it appeared to be a large pike eel. A NSW Fisheries spokesman from the Hunter region told 9news.com.au pike eels were known to grow quite large, but that he had not seen this particular specimen in the flesh. A spokeswoman for the Lake Macquarie Marine Rescue said she had heard of the news on the radio but also didn’t know of anyone who had actually seen the creature washed up on the banks.

 

 

On this day ………… 14th February 1948

On this day in 1948, lightweight boxer Mickey Davis knocked himself out in a fight with Tommy Smith at Newcastle, NSW, when he missed his opponent with a wild right, toppled over, and hit the canvas with his head. He was still unconscious when his second dragged him back to his corner. The referee could noted lair Smith the winner because he had not sent Davis to the canvas. Neither could he declare the bout no fight because the men had keenly fought for six rounds. In the end he declared it a no decision fight.

 

 

On This Day – December 30, 1864

The brig Margaret Thompson, from Newcastle, N.S.W., to Adelaide, passed Cape Otway
to-day.

On this day …….. 28th of December 1989

On this day in 1989, thirteen people were killed as Newcastle, New South Wales, is hit by an earthquake. Significant earthquakes in Australia are rare; however, on the 28th of December 1989, an exception to the norm occurred. Australia’s sixth-largest city, Newcastle, situated on the mid New South Wales coast, was hit at 10:27am by an earthquake measuring 5.6 on the Richter scale. Effects of the quake were felt throughout central-eastern New South Wales. There were reports of damage to buildings in Scone, Gladstone and Sydney, the latter some 800km away. The shaking was even felt in tall buildings, in places over 5000km away. Thirteen people were killed, and 35,000 homes, 147 schools and 3,000 other structures in the region collapsed. Most damage, and the highest death toll, occurred at the Newcastle Workers Club when walls and multiple floors collapsed, dropping 300 tonnes of concrete onto the ground-floor car park. Nine people were killed in this one location alone. A US report on the earthquake suggested that the disaster was caused by stress resulting from 200 years of underground coal mining. Australian geoscientists disagree, claiming that the Hunter Valley has been prone to minor earthquakes for years. Other evidence suggests that the hypocentre of the earthquake lay too deep underground – 12 kilometres – for it to have been caused by mining.

On this day …….. 20th of August 1857

Irishman James Johnson the sole survivor of the Dunbar which was wrecked near the entrance to Sydney Harbour on 20th August 1857 with the loss of 121 lives. Nine years later, help by two other men, Johnson was responsible for rescuing the sole survivor of the Cawarra which was wrecked off Newcastle on 12th July 1866 with the loss of 61 lives.

 

On this day …….. 20th of August 1857

Irishman James Johnson the sole survivor of the Dunbar which was wrecked near the entrance to Sydney Harbour on 20th August 1857 with the loss of 121 lives. Nine years later, help by two other men, Johnson was responsible for rescuing the sole survivor of the Cawarra which was wrecked off Newcastle on 12th July 1866 with the loss of 61 lives.

 

A sea creature, thought to be a giant pike eel, washed up on the banks of Lake Macquarie at Swansea, NSW on the 15th of February 2016. But is it a terrifying creature from the deep, or is the whole thing a bit fishy? Newcastle dad Ethan Tipper reportedly posted the photo to Facebook asking friends, “what the f—k is this?”, the Daily Telegraph reports. He had reportedly spotted the creature and taken the photo. The post has reportedly been shared more than 1000 times. Australian museum ichthyology manager Mark McGrouther told the newspaper it appeared to be a large pike eel. A NSW Fisheries spokesman from the Hunter region told 9news.com.au pike eels were known to grow quite large, but that he had not seen this particular specimen in the flesh. A spokeswoman for the Lake Macquarie Marine Rescue said she had heard of the news on the radio but also didn’t know of anyone who had actually seen the creature washed up on the banks.

 

 

On this day ………… 14th February 1948

On this day in 1948, lightweight boxer Mickey Davis knocked himself out in a fight with Tommy Smith at Newcastle, NSW, when he missed his opponent with a wild right, toppled over, and hit the canvas with his head. He was still unconscious when his second dragged him back to his corner. The referee could noted lair Smith the winner because he had not sent Davis to the canvas. Neither could he declare the bout no fight because the men had keenly fought for six rounds. In the end he declared it a no decision fight.

 

 

On this day …….. 28th of December 1989

A month after an earthquake, Ellen Head reported to the media she had been 90% blind for three years before a devastating earthquake in her home town of Newcastle on this day in 1989, killing eleven people. At the time of the earthquake Ellen was sitting at home with her husband. Afterward the 84 year olds eyesight was largely restored. “My eyes just opened wide during the two or three seconds the quake was on”, she explained. “All of a sudden, everything was perfectly clear”. While her vision was not perfect, she was able to read large print books again.

 

 

Life in Coal river (Newcastle) and Macquarie Harbour (Tasmania) was hell on earth and many Convicts felt that death was their only hope of escape. Unfortunately, many of the Irish Convicts were catholic and feared that suicide (an unforgivable sin) would send them to an eternal hell. To solve this dilemma, they devised a plan based on teamwork. Four Convicts would draw straws; one to be murdered, one to be the murderer and two to act as witnesses at the murder trial so as to ensure a conviction. The plan was win win all round. The victim would escape life without fear of going to hell. The murderer would be executed and also escape life. As for the witnesses, they would have to testify at a trial in either Sydney or Hobart and thus have a holiday.

 

 

Convict Francis Greenway was born near the English city of Bristol, where he became an architect. In 1809 he became bankrupt and in 1812 he pleaded guilty “under the advice of his friends”, to forging a financial document and was sentenced to death; this sentence was later commuted to 14 years transportation. Why he pleaded guilty is unknown; he may have been told it was the only way to save his life. Whilst awaiting deportation to Sydney, Greenway spent time in Newgate Prison where he completed paintings depicting trials and scenes within the prison. Greenway arrived in Sydney, New South Wales on the transport General Hewitt in February 1814 to serve his sentence. On board the ship was the surgeon Dr. John Harris who was to give Greenway his first private commission in the colony which involved extending his residence on his Ultimo estate. Between 1816 and 1818, while still a convict, Greenway was responsible for the design and construction of the Macquarie Lighthouse on the South Head at the entrance to Port Jackson. After the success of this project he was emancipated by the governor Lachlan Macquarie, and in the role of Acting Civil Architect and Assistant Engineer, went on to build many significant buildings in New South Wales. Greenway’s works include Hyde Park Barracks, the Government House and what is considered to be his masterpiece; St James’ Church, Sydney. There are still 49 buildings in central Sydney attributed to Greenway’s designs. Greenway died of typhoid near Newcastle in 1837, aged 59. The exact date of his death is not known. He was buried in the Glebe Cemetery at East Maitland on the 25th of September 1837, but his grave is unmarked.

Francis Greenway was on the old $10 note.