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On This Day – July 23, 1950

Allegations that Raymond Murray Baillie, 43, military pensioner, killed his wife and wounded his two sons with a rifle on July 23 last were made in the Criminal Court yesterday.

Baillie, of Nicholson-street, North Fitzroy, pleaded not guilty to the murder of his wife, Laurel, Frances Baillie. Outlining the case for the Crown before the Chief Justice (Sir Edmund Herring) and a jury, Mr. F. Nelson said Baillie had determined to resolve his domestic difficulties by ending the lives of his wife and sons, and then, ending his own life.  This determination was not fulfilled, because he was disarmed by his sons.  Mr. Nelson said there had apparently been domestic difficulties between Baillie and his wife and sons, aged 17 and 20 years, for some time before July 23. On the night in question the mother and sons decided to leave him and were packing suitcases, when Baillie got a rifle and shot his wife in their bedroom. He levelled the rifle at his two sons, one of whom was shot in the shoulder, and the other in the chest.

“We’re Leaving”

In a statement alleged to have been made to the police, Mr. Nelson said Baillie said his sons and wife started to abuse him, and his wife said to the boys; “Come on. Pack up, boys; we’re leaving.” In the alleged statement Baillie said he picked up a loaded rifle. He did not take aim, but pulled the trigger and the gun went off. He said his wife fell on the floor, and he went out to shoot himself. He realised the boys were going to attack him, so he fired three or four shots. The boys took the rifle from him and prevented him from carrying out his intention to shoot himself. Vance Baillie, who was wounded in the shoulder, said he was wakened by an argument between his mother and father, and went to his father’s bedroom after the argument quietened. He said his mother pushed his father through a window. After some discussion with his mother and brother they decided to pack and leave the home. Shortly afterwards he heard a shot and a groan. He and his brother rushed along the passage. There was a shot, and his brother fell.

Hit in Shoulder

Vance Baillie said he jumped for the kitchen door, and a shot hit him in the shoulder. Cross-examined by Mr. R. V. Monahan, K.C., for the father, Vance Baillie said, as far as he could remember, he had only “belted” his father once. About 18 months ago, he said, he got a Judo hold on his father and tossed him over his head on to a brick wall. The incident had followed a fight between his father and grandfather. He agreed with Mr. Monahan that at one time he had said he would kill his father. The hearing will be continued today.Mr. Mr. F. Nelson appeared for the Crown. . Mr. R. V. Monahan. K.C.. with Mr. J. P. Moloney (Instructed Dy Mr. R. Dunn), appeared for Baillie.

On this day ………… 6th November 1920

Whether recent demonstrations by spiritualists in Melbourne or the defeat of the prohibition party at the polls, had an unsettling effect on the nerves of peaceable citizens cannot be definitely established said the Melbourne Age, but people in Abbotsford have been seeing a ghost. At any rate, they think they have seen one.

A female apparition appeared at an old house in Nicholson Street, Abbotsford, and people have been flocking to the locality at night to see it. The ghost story, too, has improved with circulation, having gained, notoriety with additional details of a murder in the house, the periodical return of the murdered woman’s spirit, and so forth.  The ghost was nothing more than a remarkable reflection thrown on the wall by a street lamp, the rays of which strike the verandah post and cast a reflection resembling a woman’s head. This reflection has been in existence for many years, but it is only within the past few days it has become the subject of much public interest.

On this night in 1920, four police constables in Nicholson-street ”moving on’ the crowds of ghost seekers, who numbers were estimated, between 400 and 500 people.

On This Day – July 23, 1950

Allegations that Raymond Murray Baillie, 43, military pensioner, killed his wife and wounded his two sons with a rifle on July 23 last were made in the Criminal Court yesterday.

Baillie, of Nicholson-street, North Fitzroy, pleaded not guilty to the murder of his wife, Laurel, Frances Baillie. Outlining the case for the Crown before the Chief Justice (Sir Edmund Herring) and a jury, Mr. F. Nelson said Baillie had determined to resolve his domestic difficulties by ending the lives of his wife and sons, and then, ending his own life.  This determination was not fulfilled, because he was disarmed by his sons.  Mr. Nelson said there had apparently been domestic difficulties between Baillie and his wife and sons, aged 17 and 20 years, for some time before July 23. On the night in question the mother and sons decided to leave him and were packing suitcases, when Baillie got a rifle and shot his wife in their bedroom. He levelled the rifle at his two sons, one of whom was shot in the shoulder, and the other in the chest.

“We’re Leaving”

In a statement alleged to have been made to the police, Mr. Nelson said Baillie said his sons and wife started to abuse him, and his wife said to the boys; “Come on. Pack up, boys; we’re leaving.” In the alleged statement Baillie said he picked up a loaded rifle. He did not take aim, but pulled the trigger and the gun went off. He said his wife fell on the floor, and he went out to shoot himself. He realised the boys were going to attack him, so he fired three or four shots. The boys took the rifle from him and prevented him from carrying out his intention to shoot himself. Vance Baillie, who was wounded in the shoulder, said he was wakened by an argument between his mother and father, and went to his father’s bedroom after the argument quietened. He said his mother pushed his father through a window. After some discussion with his mother and brother they decided to pack and leave the home. Shortly afterwards he heard a shot and a groan. He and his brother rushed along the passage. There was a shot, and his brother fell.

Hit in Shoulder

Vance Baillie said he jumped for the kitchen door, and a shot hit him in the shoulder. Cross-examined by Mr. R. V. Monahan, K.C., for the father, Vance Baillie said, as far as he could remember, he had only “belted” his father once. About 18 months ago, he said, he got a Judo hold on his father and tossed him over his head on to a brick wall. The incident had followed a fight between his father and grandfather. He agreed with Mr. Monahan that at one time he had said he would kill his father. The hearing will be continued today.Mr. Mr. F. Nelson appeared for the Crown. . Mr. R. V. Monahan. K.C.. with Mr. J. P. Moloney (Instructed Dy Mr. R. Dunn), appeared for Baillie.

ON THIS DAY ……… 15th March 1907

FITZROY

CHARGE OF MANSLAUGHTER.

On this day in 1907, Henry Pickett died from injuries received while cycling, in a collision with a horse draw vehicle driven by James Howie in Nicholson-street, Fitzroy. At the inquest it was found that James Howie was at fault, and he was charged of manslaughter. Evidence had been given by William John Wilson, who had witnessed the collision that Howie who was driving a jinker, had called out warning to Pickett, but the latter, who was riding fairly fast, with his head down, apparently did not hear the cry.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – March 6, 1959

FITZROY

Two youths were today found guilty of manslaughter of a Fitzroy newsagent by a Supreme Court jury, which acquitted them of murder. They were Kenneth Graham Wilson, 17, labourer, of Jarvie Street, East Brunswick, and John McLaren Hazeldine, 19, labourer, of Barkley Street, Brunswick. The jury acquitted Michael John Anthony Corcoran, 15, of both murder and manslaughter. The jury added a rider requesting that Wilson’s and Hazeldine’s ages should be taken into consideration when the penalty was being fixed. Mr. Justice Lowe remanded both for sentence after saying he would call for pre sentence reports on them. All three had pleaded not guilty to having murdered John Colin Beadles, 43, news agent, of Nicholson Street, Fitzroy. Beadles died in hospital on March 8 from injuries which, the Crown claimed, were inflicted when he was battered on the head at his shop on March 6.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – February 9, 1896

NICHOLSON STREET, CARLTON

William Mackay, aged 27, residing with his parents at 32 Mill-street, North Carlton, was murdered under what appear extraordinary circumstances on this night in 1896. Joseph Frances Shiel, a labourer residing at Fitzroy, states that he was with Mackay the greater part of the day, and they were drinking together. At about 10pm they were both under the influence of liquor, and were walking down Nicholson-street towards Johnson-street when they were met by four men coming from the direction of Melbourne. Shiel says one of the men said ‘Good night,’ and then struck him on the jaw, knocking him down on the footpath. When he recovered Mackay was lying on tho footpath beside him. George Howes, a labourer, came up, and, knowing Mackay, tried to get a word from him, but unsuccessfully. He then carried him to the hospital, where he was found to be dead. The stab of a penknife was found in the side, but it was not known whether it touched the heart. No trace of the men can be found. Shiel has been arrested on a charge of murder, as blood was found on his clothes. George Howes was charged at the Carlton Court with the murder of William Mackay, Thomas Kneale with insulting behaviour, and John Noonan with vagrancy. The two latter were said to be indirectly concerned in the murder of Mackay. They were all remanded. Noonan afterwards stated that he had been in company with several of the others last night, but when he saw quarrel brewing he left. He further stated that the crowd had been drinking heavily, and that Mackay was very drunk.

 

ON THIS DAY – January 5, 1902

At 11pm on the evening of 5th of January, 1902, Albert McNamara left his home and shop to deliver a letter. By the time he returned at 11.45pm, his home was on fire and his 4 1⁄2 year old son would be burnt and pronounced dead. Catherine McNamara and their 6 year old daughter, Gladys, would escape the flames. The family had arrived in Australia in November 1901 from London. McNamara opened his ham, beef and light refreshments shop on Christmas Eve 1901 at 161 Nicholson Street. But McNamara was not doing well financially, and he had insured both his own and Catherine’s life for £300. When investigations took place after the fire, it was found that all manner of clothing and materials had been soaked in kerosene and placed in the rafters above the shop and residence. It was believed that McNamara had set these alight when he left to post the letter so he could claim the money for insurance for his wife’s death. It was not the first time that Albert McNamara had been involved with fire. A house he owned in Johanesberg had been burned when a lamp was smashed for which he collected £250 from the insurance money. McNamara was charged with arson causing loss of life and sent to trial at the Criminal Court. The jury couldn’t reach an agreement and so McNamara went to a second trial where he was convicted and sentenced to death. McNamara attempted to commit suicide in the hours before his execution, by running head first into the iron bars. He was unsuccessful and went to the gallows on the 14th April, 1902 at the Melbourne Gaol. Because of the head injury, however, blood spurted from the wound as McNamara fell to his death, creating a gory spectacle for those present. His executioner was Robert Gibbon.

 

ON THIS DAY…… 6th November 1920

SEEING A GHOST

Whether recent demonstrations by spiritualists in Melbourne or the defeat of the prohibition party at the polls, had an unsettling effect on the nerves of peaceable citizens cannot be definitely established said the Melbourne Age, but people in Abbotsford have been seeing a ghost. At any rate, they think they have seen one. A female apparition appeared at an old house in Nicholson Street, Abbotsford, and people have been flocking to the locality at night to see it. The ghost story, too, has improved with circulation, having gained, notoriety with additional details of a murder in the house, the periodical return of the murdered woman’s spirit, and so forth. The ghost was nothing more than a remarkable reflection thrown on the wall by a street lamp, the rays of which strike the verandah post and cast a reflection resembling a woman’s head. This reflection has been in existence for many years, but it is only within the past few days it has become the subject of much public interest. On this night in 1920, four police constables in Nicholson-street ”moving on’ the crowds of ghost seekers, who numbers were estimated, between 400 and 500 people.

On this day ………… 6th November 1920

Whether recent demonstrations by spiritualists in Melbourne or the defeat of the prohibition party at the polls, had an unsettling effect on the nerves of peaceable citizens cannot be definitely established said the Melbourne Age, but people in Abbotsford have been seeing a ghost. At any rate, they think they have seen one.

A female apparition appeared at an old house in Nicholson Street, Abbotsford, and people have been flocking to the locality at night to see it. The ghost story, too, has improved with circulation, having gained, notoriety with additional details of a murder in the house, the periodical return of the murdered woman’s spirit, and so forth.  The ghost was nothing more than a remarkable reflection thrown on the wall by a street lamp, the rays of which strike the verandah post and cast a reflection resembling a woman’s head. This reflection has been in existence for many years, but it is only within the past few days it has become the subject of much public interest.

On this night in 1920, four police constables in Nicholson-street ”moving on’ the crowds of ghost seekers, who numbers were estimated, between 400 and 500 people.

On This Day – July 23, 1950

Allegations that Raymond Murray Baillie, 43, military pensioner, killed his wife and wounded his two sons with a rifle on July 23 last were made in the Criminal Court yesterday.

Baillie, of Nicholson-street, North Fitzroy, pleaded not guilty to the murder of his wife, Laurel, Frances Baillie. Outlining the case for the Crown before the Chief Justice (Sir Edmund Herring) and a jury, Mr. F. Nelson said Baillie had determined to resolve his domestic difficulties by ending the lives of his wife and sons, and then, ending his own life.  This determination was not fulfilled, because he was disarmed by his sons.  Mr. Nelson said there had apparently been domestic difficulties between Baillie and his wife and sons, aged 17 and 20 years, for some time before July 23. On the night in question the mother and sons decided to leave him and were packing suitcases, when Baillie got a rifle and shot his wife in their bedroom. He levelled the rifle at his two sons, one of whom was shot in the shoulder, and the other in the chest.

“We’re Leaving”

In a statement alleged to have been made to the police, Mr. Nelson said Baillie said his sons and wife started to abuse him, and his wife said to the boys; “Come on. Pack up, boys; we’re leaving.” In the alleged statement Baillie said he picked up a loaded rifle. He did not take aim, but pulled the trigger and the gun went off. He said his wife fell on the floor, and he went out to shoot himself. He realised the boys were going to attack him, so he fired three or four shots. The boys took the rifle from him and prevented him from carrying out his intention to shoot himself. Vance Baillie, who was wounded in the shoulder, said he was wakened by an argument between his mother and father, and went to his father’s bedroom after the argument quietened. He said his mother pushed his father through a window. After some discussion with his mother and brother they decided to pack and leave the home. Shortly afterwards he heard a shot and a groan. He and his brother rushed along the passage. There was a shot, and his brother fell.

Hit in Shoulder

Vance Baillie said he jumped for the kitchen door, and a shot hit him in the shoulder. Cross-examined by Mr. R. V. Monahan, K.C., for the father, Vance Baillie said, as far as he could remember, he had only “belted” his father once. About 18 months ago, he said, he got a Judo hold on his father and tossed him over his head on to a brick wall. The incident had followed a fight between his father and grandfather. He agreed with Mr. Monahan that at one time he had said he would kill his father. The hearing will be continued today.Mr. Mr. F. Nelson appeared for the Crown. . Mr. R. V. Monahan. K.C.. with Mr. J. P. Moloney (Instructed Dy Mr. R. Dunn), appeared for Baillie.

ON THIS DAY ……… 15th March 1907

FITZROY

CHARGE OF MANSLAUGHTER.

On this day in 1907, Henry Pickett died from injuries received while cycling, in a collision with a horse draw vehicle driven by James Howie in Nicholson-street, Fitzroy. At the inquest it was found that James Howie was at fault, and he was charged of manslaughter. Evidence had been given by William John Wilson, who had witnessed the collision that Howie who was driving a jinker, had called out warning to Pickett, but the latter, who was riding fairly fast, with his head down, apparently did not hear the cry.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – March 6, 1959

FITZROY

Two youths were today found guilty of manslaughter of a Fitzroy newsagent by a Supreme Court jury, which acquitted them of murder. They were Kenneth Graham Wilson, 17, labourer, of Jarvie Street, East Brunswick, and John McLaren Hazeldine, 19, labourer, of Barkley Street, Brunswick. The jury acquitted Michael John Anthony Corcoran, 15, of both murder and manslaughter. The jury added a rider requesting that Wilson’s and Hazeldine’s ages should be taken into consideration when the penalty was being fixed. Mr. Justice Lowe remanded both for sentence after saying he would call for pre sentence reports on them. All three had pleaded not guilty to having murdered John Colin Beadles, 43, news agent, of Nicholson Street, Fitzroy. Beadles died in hospital on March 8 from injuries which, the Crown claimed, were inflicted when he was battered on the head at his shop on March 6.