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ON THIS DAY – July 8, 1889

The inquiry into the circumstances surrounding the murder of the woman Annie Thornton was resumed at the morgue to-day. The self-confessed murderer, Phillip Costello, was present in custody; and although a Spanish interpreter was present for his benefit, his services were hardly required, as the prisoner maintained a stolid silence throughout the proceedings. There was a large crowd of curious persons present, anxious to see the Japanese Boy, by which name the murderer was known among his former acquaintances. The Crown Prosecutor appeared to conduct the inquiry, and the prisoner was not represented. Evidence was called proving that the accused was the last person seen in the company of the murdered woman, prior to her disappearance. Louise Kennedy, who lives in Somerset-place, deposed that she was passing the house of the deceased on July 8, about 11 o’clock in the evening, when she heard stifled screams, which appeared to come from the bedroom in the house where the murder was committed. The next morning the house was closed up, and she heard no more until the remains were discovered. Pierre Snuag, a Frenchman, second cook at Antonio’s restaurant, deposed that he slept in the same room as the accused on the night of the 8th. The accused did not come home in the morning. Witness noticed that the accused had a black eye. On being questioned about it the accused said he had been fighting. Two days after the prisoner was wearing a silver bracelet in the kitchen. He had once seen the accused with a sheath-knife when he was fighting in the kitchen. Frances Cope, a young woman, deposed that the prisoner, on the Friday after the murder, came into the shop in Flinders-street, and gave her a bracelet and two rings, saying he had had a, row with his girl, and that she had gone to Sydney. The witness on hearing of the murder went to the detective office and gave up the jewellery. Constable Taylor knew the murdered woman as Amery, Gorry, Wilson, and Hilton. She had been locked up for insulting behaviour. After some further evidence the jury returned a verdict of wilful murder and the prisoner was committed for trial.

ON THIS DAY – April 19, 1944

NORTH CARLTON

HUSBAND GUILTY OF MANSLAUGHTER

The jury in the Criminal Court this evening found Victor Dowling, a 19-year-old soldier, guilty of the manslaughter of his 15-year-old wife, Jean Dowling, who was shot dead at her mother’s home in North Carlton on April 19. Dowling was presented for trial on a charge of murder, but the jury acquitted him of that charge and strongly recommended him for mercy. Dowling was remanded for sentence.

 

ON THIS DAY – October 6, 1973

 

Two children were killed and a third child is in a satisfactory condition in hospital after a stabbing incident in North Carlton last night. Antoinetta Lamberti-Gigliotti, 9, is in the Royal Children’s Hospital with knife wounds to the chest, abdomen and arms. Her brother, Franco, 6, and sister, Maria, 4, were stabbed to death in their home in Amess Street. When police arrived at the house they found pictures of the children taped to the wall and a note in Italian. Handprints in blood were on the wall around the pictures. In the house they found the children’s father, Mr Antonio Lamberti-Gigliotti, bleeding, from stab wounds to the chest. He was admitted to the Royal Melbourne Hospital and a hospital spokesman said he was in a satisfactory condition after having his spleen removed.

ON THIS DAY – July 8, 1889

The inquiry into the circumstances surrounding the murder of the woman Annie Thornton was resumed at the morgue to-day. The self-confessed murderer, Phillip Costello, was present in custody; and although a Spanish interpreter was present for his benefit, his services were hardly required, as the prisoner maintained a stolid silence throughout the proceedings. There was a large crowd of curious persons present, anxious to see the Japanese Boy, by which name the murderer was known among his former acquaintances. The Crown Prosecutor appeared to conduct the inquiry, and the prisoner was not represented. Evidence was called proving that the accused was the last person seen in the company of the murdered woman, prior to her disappearance. Louise Kennedy, who lives in Somerset-place, deposed that she was passing the house of the deceased on July 8, about 11 o’clock in the evening, when she heard stifled screams, which appeared to come from the bedroom in the house where the murder was committed. The next morning the house was closed up, and she heard no more until the remains were discovered. Pierre Snuag, a Frenchman, second cook at Antonio’s restaurant, deposed that he slept in the same room as the accused on the night of the 8th. The accused did not come home in the morning. Witness noticed that the accused had a black eye. On being questioned about it the accused said he had been fighting. Two days after the prisoner was wearing a silver bracelet in the kitchen. He had once seen the accused with a sheath-knife when he was fighting in the kitchen. Frances Cope, a young woman, deposed that the prisoner, on the Friday after the murder, came into the shop in Flinders-street, and gave her a bracelet and two rings, saying he had had a, row with his girl, and that she had gone to Sydney. The witness on hearing of the murder went to the detective office and gave up the jewellery. Constable Taylor knew the murdered woman as Amery, Gorry, Wilson, and Hilton. She had been locked up for insulting behaviour. After some further evidence the jury returned a verdict of wilful murder and the prisoner was committed for trial.

On This Day – May 9th, 1889

On May 9th, 1889, a man named Walter Brooks, an insurance agent, attempted to murder a woman with whom he had been living, named Matilda Thompson, at Earl-street, North Carlton.  Brooks was charged with wilful trespass at the house of Mrs Thompson’s son the week before. He went to gaol, and was liberated on the 8th of May.

On the morning of the 9th of May, he again went to the house of Mrs Thompson’s son, in Earl street, and knocked at the door.  He was refused admittance, and immediately placed a small six chambered revolver at the keyhole and fired two shots. A young woman, named Emily Spooner who was in the house with Mrs Thompson, and on hearing the shot she rushed out the back door. Brooks met her at the door as she was going out, and rushed into the house. Mrs Thompson was in the front room, and Brooks went to where she was and caught her by the neck and threw her across his knees and threatened to blow her brains out, at the same time placing the revolver at her head. At this moment Mrs Liddy, who is the landlady of the house, and Constables Reidy and Lowry, who had been attracted by the sound of the gunshot, arrived on the scene, and Brooks, who was struggling with Mrs Thompson, released her and let her go to answer the door. As soon as the door was opened Mrs Thompson rushed out. Brooks followed her to the door, and on seeing the constables drew back and closed the door.

Almost immediately, another shot was heard, and on the police entering the property, they found the man lying on a bed in the bedroom, with the revolver clutched in his hand, whilst the blood was flowing profusely from his mouth and nose.

In the deceased’s hand was found a portrait of Mrs Thompson, and also a letter in which he stated that he and Mrs Thompson had been living together as man and wife for some time. All was alright until about three weeks ago when she had neglected his children, which were by his late wife, and had then left him. He stated that he loved her better than his soul and intended to murder her and then commit suicide, and prayed that God would assist him to complete it.

ON THIS DAY – April 19, 1944

NORTH CARLTON

HUSBAND GUILTY OF MANSLAUGHTER

The jury in the Criminal Court this evening found Victor Dowling, a 19-year-old soldier, guilty of the manslaughter of his 15-year-old wife, Jean Dowling, who was shot dead at her mother’s home in North Carlton on April 19. Dowling was presented for trial on a charge of murder, but the jury acquitted him of that charge and strongly recommended him for mercy. Dowling was remanded for sentence.

 

ON THIS DAY – February 5, 1943

PRAHRAN

Homicide squad detectives, who investigate the murder of Francis John Phelan, aged 32, taxi-driver, North Carlton, how few clues to go by. Phelan had been shot three times while in his taxi on the night of the 5th of February. His body was dumped in a gutter in Izett Street, Prahran. The taxi was found, abandoned, half a mile away. A young American serviceman was taken to the Detective Office on the 9h of April for questioning by detectives investigating the murder of Phelan. He was escorted to the police station by a squad of American military police. He was later charged with murder.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – October 6, 1973

 

Two children were killed and a third child is in a satisfactory condition in hospital after a stabbing incident in North Carlton last night. Antoinetta Lamberti-Gigliotti, 9, is in the Royal Children’s Hospital with knife wounds to the chest, abdomen and arms. Her brother, Franco, 6, and sister, Maria, 4, were stabbed to death in their home in Amess Street. When police arrived at the house they found pictures of the children taped to the wall and a note in Italian. Handprints in blood were on the wall around the pictures. In the house they found the children’s father, Mr Antonio Lamberti-Gigliotti, bleeding, from stab wounds to the chest. He was admitted to the Royal Melbourne Hospital and a hospital spokesman said he was in a satisfactory condition after having his spleen removed.

ON THIS DAY – July 8, 1889

The inquiry into the circumstances surrounding the murder of the woman Annie Thornton was resumed at the morgue to-day. The self-confessed murderer, Phillip Costello, was present in custody; and although a Spanish interpreter was present for his benefit, his services were hardly required, as the prisoner maintained a stolid silence throughout the proceedings. There was a large crowd of curious persons present, anxious to see the Japanese Boy, by which name the murderer was known among his former acquaintances. The Crown Prosecutor appeared to conduct the inquiry, and the prisoner was not represented. Evidence was called proving that the accused was the last person seen in the company of the murdered woman, prior to her disappearance. Louise Kennedy, who lives in Somerset-place, deposed that she was passing the house of the deceased on July 8, about 11 o’clock in the evening, when she heard stifled screams, which appeared to come from the bedroom in the house where the murder was committed. The next morning the house was closed up, and she heard no more until the remains were discovered. Pierre Snuag, a Frenchman, second cook at Antonio’s restaurant, deposed that he slept in the same room as the accused on the night of the 8th. The accused did not come home in the morning. Witness noticed that the accused had a black eye. On being questioned about it the accused said he had been fighting. Two days after the prisoner was wearing a silver bracelet in the kitchen. He had once seen the accused with a sheath-knife when he was fighting in the kitchen. Frances Cope, a young woman, deposed that the prisoner, on the Friday after the murder, came into the shop in Flinders-street, and gave her a bracelet and two rings, saying he had had a, row with his girl, and that she had gone to Sydney. The witness on hearing of the murder went to the detective office and gave up the jewellery. Constable Taylor knew the murdered woman as Amery, Gorry, Wilson, and Hilton. She had been locked up for insulting behaviour. After some further evidence the jury returned a verdict of wilful murder and the prisoner was committed for trial.

On This Day – May 9th, 1889

On May 9th, 1889, a man named Walter Brooks, an insurance agent, attempted to murder a woman with whom he had been living, named Matilda Thompson, at Earl-street, North Carlton.  Brooks was charged with wilful trespass at the house of Mrs Thompson’s son the week before. He went to gaol, and was liberated on the 8th of May.

On the morning of the 9th of May, he again went to the house of Mrs Thompson’s son, in Earl street, and knocked at the door.  He was refused admittance, and immediately placed a small six chambered revolver at the keyhole and fired two shots. A young woman, named Emily Spooner who was in the house with Mrs Thompson, and on hearing the shot she rushed out the back door. Brooks met her at the door as she was going out, and rushed into the house. Mrs Thompson was in the front room, and Brooks went to where she was and caught her by the neck and threw her across his knees and threatened to blow her brains out, at the same time placing the revolver at her head. At this moment Mrs Liddy, who is the landlady of the house, and Constables Reidy and Lowry, who had been attracted by the sound of the gunshot, arrived on the scene, and Brooks, who was struggling with Mrs Thompson, released her and let her go to answer the door. As soon as the door was opened Mrs Thompson rushed out. Brooks followed her to the door, and on seeing the constables drew back and closed the door.

Almost immediately, another shot was heard, and on the police entering the property, they found the man lying on a bed in the bedroom, with the revolver clutched in his hand, whilst the blood was flowing profusely from his mouth and nose.

In the deceased’s hand was found a portrait of Mrs Thompson, and also a letter in which he stated that he and Mrs Thompson had been living together as man and wife for some time. All was alright until about three weeks ago when she had neglected his children, which were by his late wife, and had then left him. He stated that he loved her better than his soul and intended to murder her and then commit suicide, and prayed that God would assist him to complete it.

ON THIS DAY – April 19, 1944

NORTH CARLTON

HUSBAND GUILTY OF MANSLAUGHTER

The jury in the Criminal Court this evening found Victor Dowling, a 19-year-old soldier, guilty of the manslaughter of his 15-year-old wife, Jean Dowling, who was shot dead at her mother’s home in North Carlton on April 19. Dowling was presented for trial on a charge of murder, but the jury acquitted him of that charge and strongly recommended him for mercy. Dowling was remanded for sentence.

 

ON THIS DAY – February 5, 1943

PRAHRAN

Homicide squad detectives, who investigate the murder of Francis John Phelan, aged 32, taxi-driver, North Carlton, how few clues to go by. Phelan had been shot three times while in his taxi on the night of the 5th of February. His body was dumped in a gutter in Izett Street, Prahran. The taxi was found, abandoned, half a mile away. A young American serviceman was taken to the Detective Office on the 9h of April for questioning by detectives investigating the murder of Phelan. He was escorted to the police station by a squad of American military police. He was later charged with murder.