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Mona Vale mansion, at Ross in Tasmania, was built in 1868 for the wealthy land owner and Tasmanian Parliamentarian Robert Quayle Kermode and he entertained the Duke of Edinburgh there shortly after it was completed. The stained glass windows were created by the Ferguson & Urie stained glass company of North Melbourne and were selected by the architect of Mona Vale, Henry Hunter, during a visit to Victoria in 1867.

Has 365 windows – for each day of the year
Has 7 entrances – for each day of the week
Has 12 chimneys – for each month of the year
Has 52 rooms – for each week of the year

 

ON THIS DAY……. 1st August 1953

Two men were charged in the City Court on this day in 1953 with the murder of Ernest Clarkson, 69, of Gordon-avenue, Tecoma. Charged were two Cypriots, Vassos Socratous, 24, of Flemington-road, North Melbourne, and Lenndras Yiannakou, 39, of Rathdown street, Carlton. Both men were remanded to the City Court on  the 11th of August. He refused bail. Clarkson, chief steward of the Royal Melbourne Golf Club was found dead on the promises in Cheltenham-road, Black Rock, on this day in 1953. He had been battered about the head.  Senior . Detective Graham Davidson told the Court that Clarkson’s body was found on the floor of the golf club’s locker room. Police took possession of a bloodstained hammer. Davidson said the men in the dock were detained and questioned early today. They had made admissions before being charged.. Socratous is a short slim man with dark, curly hair. He was neatly dressed, Yiannakou is taller and is heavily built, with black, woolly hair, and olive complexion.

ON THIS DAY – December 11, 1930

MELBOURNE

On a charge of having murdered Dizedes Messerschmidt, 27, a Czecho Slovakian, of North Melbourne, on December 11. Jozef Thur, 33, a fellow countryman, was committed for trial today by the coroner. The police alleged that Thur made a statement to them, admitting having stabbed Messerschmidt.

 

ON THIS DAY – October 29, 1927

NORTH MELBOURNE

RIVAL GANGS.

Charge of Attempted Murder.

Walter Lew Shing (19), fruiterer, and Leslie Coe (19), labourer, were charged at the City Court to-day with having, on October 29, at North Melbourne, attempted to murder Richard Dunstan.   Senior-Detective Bruce said that it was alleged that accused are members of the ‘Wanderers’ Push,’ and that on Saturday Coe stole a motor car and went with Shing to North Melbourne. An altercation over some girls took place with some members of another ‘push’ known as the ‘Hawk Eyes’. In the course of the altercation Dunstan was shot in the stomach. Dunstan was now in the Melbourne Hospital in a serious condition. Shing and Coe were each remanded to November 7. Bail in each case was fixed at £30 and a surety of £500.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – October 28, 1933

 

Albert Lewis (59), labourer, of Peel street, North Melbourne, was charged in the City Court to-day with having, on October 28, murdered Maurice Langley (75), pawnbroker, of Elizabeth-street. Lewis had been detained on a vagrancy charge, as he was suspected of having been one of two men alleged to have been in the pawnshop when the pawnbroker was shot Detective J. E. M’Keogh said that at 1.35 pm. on October 28, Langley was shot in his shop in Elizabeth street. Two men were seen in the shop at the time, and after a struggle a brother of the dead man captured a man named von Geyer, who was charged with murder. The second man escaped. Late that night, Lewis was arrested at West Melbourne and charged with vagrancy. He since had been identified as one of the men who were in the shop, and later was charged with murder. Lewis was remanded to appear at the City Court on November 5.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – October 25, 1933

 

On the application of Sergeant de la Rue at the City Court yesterday, Robert Ernest von Geyer painter aged 50 years of Argyle Square Carlton and Albert Lewis; labourer aged 49 years of Peel street North Melbourne who were charged with having murdered Maurice Langley pawnbroker of Elizabeth street city on October 25 were remanded to appear before the City Court on November 17.  Sergeant de la Rue explained to Mr Bond P M that no date had been fixed for the hearing of the inquest.

Mona Vale mansion, at Ross in Tasmania, was built in 1868 for the wealthy land owner and Tasmanian Parliamentarian Robert Quayle Kermode and he entertained the Duke of Edinburgh there shortly after it was completed. The stained glass windows were created by the Ferguson & Urie stained glass company of North Melbourne and were selected by the architect of Mona Vale, Henry Hunter, during a visit to Victoria in 1867.

Has 365 windows – for each day of the year
Has 7 entrances – for each day of the week
Has 12 chimneys – for each month of the year
Has 52 rooms – for each week of the year

 

ON THIS DAY……. 1st August 1953

Two men were charged in the City Court on this day in 1953 with the murder of Ernest Clarkson, 69, of Gordon-avenue, Tecoma. Charged were two Cypriots, Vassos Socratous, 24, of Flemington-road, North Melbourne, and Lenndras Yiannakou, 39, of Rathdown street, Carlton. Both men were remanded to the City Court on  the 11th of August. He refused bail. Clarkson, chief steward of the Royal Melbourne Golf Club was found dead on the promises in Cheltenham-road, Black Rock, on this day in 1953. He had been battered about the head.  Senior . Detective Graham Davidson told the Court that Clarkson’s body was found on the floor of the golf club’s locker room. Police took possession of a bloodstained hammer. Davidson said the men in the dock were detained and questioned early today. They had made admissions before being charged.. Socratous is a short slim man with dark, curly hair. He was neatly dressed, Yiannakou is taller and is heavily built, with black, woolly hair, and olive complexion.

On This Day ……. 27th May 1908

A prisoner named James Wilson, aged 66 years, died in Geelong Gaol on this day in 1908, from pneumonia. Wilson was sentenced at North Melbourne in November last to six months imprisonment. His sentence expired on May 1, but he was in such a bad state of health that he had since been brought before the Court from week to week, and had been further sentenced.

ON THIS DAY….. 26th May 1915

Charged with the manslaughter of Denis McSweeney, at North Melbourne, on this day in 1915, Andrew McGough, withdrew his plea of not guilty and pleaded guilty. The accused assaulted McSweeney without warning. The Chief Justice, in passing sentence of three years imprisonment, said that McGough had acted like a tiger. Looking at the facts of the case he asked himself why McGough was not charged with murder. He thought that the case was one for the full penalty prescribed by the, Act, but taking into account the fact that McGough was a hard working man and only gave way occasionally to bursts of intemperance, he would impose a sentence of three years.

ON THIS DAY – May 16, 1915

NORTH MELBOURNE

MELBOURNE MANSLAUGHTER CASE

Charged with the manslaughter of Denis McSweeney at North Melbourne on May 16, Francis McGough, at the close of the Crown case in the Criminal Court to-day, withdrew his plea of not guilty and pleaded guilty. The accused assaulted McSweeney without warning. The Chief Justice (Sir John Madden), in passing a sentence of three years’ imprisonment, said that McGough had acted like a tiger. Looking at the facts of the case, he asked himself why McGough was not charged with murder. He thought that the case was one for the full penalty prescribed by the Act, but. taking into account the fact that McGough was a hard working man and only gave way occasionally to bursts of intemperance, he would only impose a sentence of three years’ imprisonment.

ON THIS DAY – April 30, 1950

NORTH MELBOURNE

Five hours after retirement, a Criminal Court jury found James Raymond O’Keefe, 58, barrister, guilty of the murder of his crippled wife at their home in North Melbourne on this day in 1950. Mr. Justice Gavan Duffy sentenced O’Keefe to death. He said he would pass on the jury’s strong recommendation for mercy, which he would second. Shortly after the jury retired, they returned to ask whether mental or emotional provocation would justify manslaughter after physical provocation. When the Judge replied, “No,” Mr. Monahan, K.C., Senior Counsel for O’Keefe, objected. The Judge said the objection would be noted. Addresses by Counsel revealed conflict between the Crown and the defence whether some words in a confession to police by O’Keefe showed it to be a “mercy killing.” O’Keefe made no effort to tell the Court the story of happenings on the Sunday when he first attacked his wife with a knife, which was wrenched from him. Evidence stated that O’Keefe used a bread knife. After a five minute struggle, he inflicted fatal wounds on her throat. Instead of putting O’Keefe into the witness box, his counsel called 16 witnesses to say that O’Keefe was a kindly, considerate husband, whose tolerance to his wife’s tantrums had collapsed when his practice was ruined and his patience exhausted.