Posts

Solo synchronized swimming:

Oxymoron alert! Yes, this sport features one female swimmer synchronizing with herself. The sport made its debut in the Los Angeles Games in 1984, with U.S. swimmer Tracie Ruiz winning the gold medal. Similar to the group event, a swimmer performs a kind of water ballet. A lonely water ballet. Despite the seemingly misleading title, organisers of the sport say the swimmer is actually in sync with the music. The solo event was discontinued after 1992.

Club Swinging:
Club Swinging debuted in 1904. The athlete stands erect, holding clubs that resemble bowling pins in each hand. He then twirls and whirls them around. The more complicated the routine, the more points he wins. Historians say the sport was the precursor to rhythmic gymnastic events that use ribbons and hoops. Club Swinging was only in the Olympics twice, ending in 1932.

Tug-of-war:
Once a very competitive Olympic sport, tug of war employs teams that struggle and strain to pull a rope past a certain point. Great Britain actually won the most medals in this event, historians say. Tug-of-war was an Olympic event until 1920.

Live pigeon shooting:
The 1900 Olympics in Paris had the great distinction of being the first Games where women competed. It also wore the ignoble badge for this sport, where athletes aimed to bring down as many pigeons as possible. Nearly 300 birds were slain, historians say, leaving a bloody, feathery mess. The winner shot down 21 pigeons.
The 1900 Games in Paris was the only time pigeon killing was featured in the Olympics.

Swimming obstacle course:
As strange as this sport may seem, the obstacles swimmers had to overcome are even more unusual. In the 1900 Games in Paris, swimmers crawled over boats, swam under them and climbed a pole, all the while swimming 200 meters in the Seine.

La Canne:
Ok, think fencing. Now take away the saber and replace it with a cane. You know, the walking stick type of thing? Voila, now you have the French martial art La Canne, that debuted at the 1924 Olympics.

Rope climbing:
Yes, the activity that made you feel like a weakling in your physical education class debuted as an Olympic sport in 1896. Just like in your gym class, climbers are timed to see how quickly they can shimmy up a braided rope.
But unlike your classmates, these athletes didn’t run out of steam before reaching the top. After 1932, the Olympics thankfully left rope climbing behind.

 

On this day …….. 28th April 1949

Melbourne was announced as the host city for the Games of the XVI Olympiad on 28 April 1949, beating bids from Buenos Aires, Mexico City and six other American cities by a single vote. The Olympic Games commenced with an opening ceremony in November 1956. Because Melbourne is located in the southern hemisphere, the Olympics were held later in the year than those held in the northern hemisphere. Strict quarantine laws prevented Melbourne from hosting the equestrian events, and they were instead held in Stockholm on June 10, five months before the rest of the Olympic games began. Despite boycotts by several countries over international events unrelated to Australia, the games proceeded well, and earned the nickname of “The Friendly Games”. It was at the first Australian-held Olympics that the tradition began of the athletes mingling with one another, rather than marching in teams, for their final appearance around the stadium.

 

Solo synchronized swimming:

Oxymoron alert! Yes, this sport features one female swimmer synchronizing with herself. The sport made its debut in the Los Angeles Games in 1984, with U.S. swimmer Tracie Ruiz winning the gold medal. Similar to the group event, a swimmer performs a kind of water ballet. A lonely water ballet. Despite the seemingly misleading title, organisers of the sport say the swimmer is actually in sync with the music. The solo event was discontinued after 1992.

Club Swinging:
Club Swinging debuted in 1904. The athlete stands erect, holding clubs that resemble bowling pins in each hand. He then twirls and whirls them around. The more complicated the routine, the more points he wins. Historians say the sport was the precursor to rhythmic gymnastic events that use ribbons and hoops. Club Swinging was only in the Olympics twice, ending in 1932.

Tug-of-war:
Once a very competitive Olympic sport, tug of war employs teams that struggle and strain to pull a rope past a certain point. Great Britain actually won the most medals in this event, historians say. Tug-of-war was an Olympic event until 1920.

Live pigeon shooting:
The 1900 Olympics in Paris had the great distinction of being the first Games where women competed. It also wore the ignoble badge for this sport, where athletes aimed to bring down as many pigeons as possible. Nearly 300 birds were slain, historians say, leaving a bloody, feathery mess. The winner shot down 21 pigeons.
The 1900 Games in Paris was the only time pigeon killing was featured in the Olympics.

Swimming obstacle course:
As strange as this sport may seem, the obstacles swimmers had to overcome are even more unusual. In the 1900 Games in Paris, swimmers crawled over boats, swam under them and climbed a pole, all the while swimming 200 meters in the Seine.

La Canne:
Ok, think fencing. Now take away the saber and replace it with a cane. You know, the walking stick type of thing? Voila, now you have the French martial art La Canne, that debuted at the 1924 Olympics.

Rope climbing:
Yes, the activity that made you feel like a weakling in your physical education class debuted as an Olympic sport in 1896. Just like in your gym class, climbers are timed to see how quickly they can shimmy up a braided rope.
But unlike your classmates, these athletes didn’t run out of steam before reaching the top. After 1932, the Olympics thankfully left rope climbing behind.

 

On this day …….. 28th April 1949

Melbourne was announced as the host city for the Games of the XVI Olympiad on 28 April 1949, beating bids from Buenos Aires, Mexico City and six other American cities by a single vote. The Olympic Games commenced with an opening ceremony in November 1956. Because Melbourne is located in the southern hemisphere, the Olympics were held later in the year than those held in the northern hemisphere. Strict quarantine laws prevented Melbourne from hosting the equestrian events, and they were instead held in Stockholm on June 10, five months before the rest of the Olympic games began. Despite boycotts by several countries over international events unrelated to Australia, the games proceeded well, and earned the nickname of “The Friendly Games”. It was at the first Australian-held Olympics that the tradition began of the athletes mingling with one another, rather than marching in teams, for their final appearance around the stadium.

 

A fainting fit after a hot day at the beach front? Possibly, or maybe a blow to the head. Either way, hardly surprising as this elegant lady was engaged in a bare-knuckle boxing match with another woman. No hard feelings though; her opponent is seen here offering her a spot of water from a tea cup in an apparent attempt at revival. Sparring in 1895 in Sydney’s Freshwater, the pair may have been among the first women to box in Australia. Women’s prize fighting boxing began in the 1720s in England, but what scant records exist of Australian women’s boxing suggest that the first classes didn’t start to be offered until 1892. The sport remained controversial, banned in New South Wales as recently as 1986 to 2008. Internationally, it was only in 2012 that women’s boxing was allowed at the Olympics.