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On this day …….. 21st of April 1970

The Hutt River Province Principality is a large farming property about 595 km north of Perth, Western Australia, and is about 75 square km in size. It was founded on 21 April 1970 by farmer Leonard George Casley when he and his family and associates proclaimed their secession from Western Australia. The year 1969 saw the climax of a long-running dispute between Casley and the Western Australian government over what Casley believed to be unreasonable wheat quotas which would spell ruin for his farm, family and business. Casley resorted to an apparent provision in British common law which he felt allowed him to secede and declare independence from the Commonwealth of Australia. Casley was elected administrator of the new “sovereign state” by his family and later became the self-styled His Royal Highness Prince Leonard of Hutt. Exports of the principality include wildflowers, agricultural produce, stamps and coins, while tourism is also important to its economy. Although actual residents are very few, it claims to have a world-wide citizenship of 13,000. Neither Australia nor any other nation has acknowledged recognition of the Province publicly.

 

On this day …….. 16th of December 1994

Perth is the latest destination for UFO’s according to security guards who claim to have been followed by strange lights around the central business district overnight. National UFO Reporting and Sightings Hot line spokesman Ross Dowe said the sighting was the fourth since last weekend, with other UFO sightings in Victoria, South Australia and NSW. Mr Dowe said three security guards reported seeing a bright orange object, about the size of a semi-trailer, at 3am today, and that five people reported seeing a UFO flying over the Sale RAAF base, east of Melbourne, last Sunday. He said the reports stated the people had seen a number of small lights three times within 10 minutes. At the third appearance the lights merged together and exploded above the RAAF base, lighting up the sky, he said. In Orange, a farmer claimed to have seen an aqua blue object with a silver flame at about 9pm on Saturday night. Mr Dowe said a woman who was driving on Tuesday night in Adelaide said she became engulfed in a “dense, dusty fog” and experienced electrical problems with her vehicle. The woman reported being near the site of a research paddock which had its crop flattened in one corner into the shape of a circle.

 

ON THIS DAY – December 5, 1936

Giacomo Tarca (30), farm labourer. who was sentenced in Melbourne in March last to eight years’ imprisonment on a charge of manslaughter was deported on the Italian motor ship Romolo, which left Fremantle for Italy on Friday. Local interest in the case was increased by the fact that Tarca was arrested in Perth. Tarca was employed as a farm labourer by Luigi Marchesi, of Lilydale, Victoria. On November 1 last Marchesi disappeared, and on the following day Tarca left the farm. Marchesi’s charred and broken bones were found on the property on December 5, and on the night of December 10, following an intensive search through Victoria, South Australia and this State, Tarca was arrested as he stepped from a train at the Perth railway station. Tarca had been seen on the train when it left Fremantle, and the Perth detectives who were informed, boarded the train at Subiaco. to look for him. The accused man was subsequently sent back to Melbourne, where he stood his trial for the wilful murder of Marchesi, Detective McLennan, of Perth, going to Melbourne to give evidence. Tarca was eventually found guilty of manslaughter and the judge, in sentencing him to eight years’ imprisonment, remarked on the brutality of the case, and expressed the hope that the authorities would deport Tarca when an opportunity occurred. Tarca is a native of Mello, Northern Italy. He came to Australia in August, 1927, and after working for a short time in Fremantle, he went to Victoria, where he obtained work as a farm labourer.

ON THIS DAY…… 12th November 2012

It’s a holy war!

An 80-year-old Catholic priest bit off another priest’s ear and socked him in the face over a parking spot in Perth Australia. Father Thomas Henry Byrne appeared in court on this day in 2012, after he allegedly started the violent brawl when 81-year-old Father Thomas Joseph Cameron Smith wouldn’t give up his parking space. After a brief scuffle, Byrne reportedly told Smith to pick up an item on the ground. The item was Smith’s ear, though it took him a while to figure out what it was. Smith wrapped the flesh in a tea towel and drove to a local hospital, where staffed phoned him an ambulance. He was taken to surgery, while cops went to arrest Byrne on a charge of grievous bodily harm. Byrne had a black eye when he showed up in court, according to the Independent. An East Perth magistrate ordered that Byrne not go within 30 feet of Smith, who lives in the same apartment complex.

On This Day – November 1, 1935

Charged with the murder of Luigi Marchesi, a farmer, at Gruyere, near Lilydale Victoria, on November 1, Giacomo T’arca (26), a farm laborer, who had been employed by Marchesi, was remanded today till January 3 by Mr. Freeman, P.J., in the City Court. Senior-Detective WIlliam J. Sloan gave evidence of Tarca’s arrest in Perth on December 20.

On this day …….. 3rd of October 1935

Possible the most renowned Australian dessert is undoubtedly the pavlova, but which country did it originate from is a hot topic. Consisting of a base made of meringue crust topped with whipped cream and fresh fruits such as kiwi fruit, passionfruit and strawberries. The Australian legend states that the pavlova was created by Herbert Sachse, the chef of the Hotel Esplanade in Perth, Western Australia, on 3 October 1935. It is said to have been given the name “Pavlova” by Harry Naire from the Perth hotel, in honour of the visiting Russian ballerina, Anna Pavlova. Naire is alleged to have stated that the built up sides of the dessert reminded him of her tutu. New Zealand may have a greater claim to the pavlova, however. Recipes for pavlova appeared in a magazine and a cookery book from 1926. What is clear is that, while the dessert may have been invented in New Zealand, it was undisputedly named in Australia.

 

On this day …….. 3rd September 1901

Following the proclamation of the Commonwealth of Australia on 1 January 1901, the Commonwealth government held a design competition for a new national flag. There were 32,000 entries in the competition, and most featured the Union Jack, the Southern Cross, or native animals. Five almost identical entries were selected to share the 200 pound prize. The entries belonged to Ivor Evans, a fourteen-year-old schoolboy from Melbourne; Leslie John Hawkins, a teenager apprenticed to an optician from Sydney; Egbert John Nuttall, an architect from Melbourne; Annie Dorrington, an artist from Perth; and William Stevens, a ship’s officer from Auckland, New Zealand. On 3 September 1901, the new Australian flag flew for the first time from the top of the Exhibition Building in Melbourne. The flag was simplified, and approved by King Edward VII in 1902.

 

On this day …….. 23rd May 1960

In 1950, Australian Prime Minister Robert Menzies announced a gradual introduction of television in Australia, commencing with the launch of an ABC station. Three years later his government amended the 1948 Broadcasting Act to allow for commercial television licences. Test transmissions commenced in Sydney and Melbourne in July 1956. Australia’s first TV broadcast was made on 16 September 1956 by TCN Channel 9 in Sydney. Melbourne was the next city to commence transmissions, which occurred later that year. Brisbane, Perth and Adelaide each launched their own television station in 1959. Tasmania was the last of the state capitals to begin transmissions. Four years after the first test transmissions in Australia, on 23 May 1960, TVT-6 launched in Hobart, bringing television to Tasmania. TVT stood for TeleVision Tasmania; at first, it transmitted from Mt Wellington, and covered just the southern part of the state.

On this day …….. 2nd May 1829

The city of Fremantle lies just south of Perth, at the mouth of the Swan River. Dutch captain Willem de Vlamingh named the Swan River in 1697 because of the black swans he saw in abundance there. As the first city in Western Australia, Fremantle is steeped in rich and fascinating history. In 1829, Captain Charles Fremantle was sent to take formal possession of the remainder of New Holland which had not already been claimed for Britain under the territory of New South Wales. On the 2nd of May 1829, Captain Fremantle raised the Union Jack on the south head of the Swan River, thus claiming the territory for Britain. The colony of Western Australia was proclaimed on the 8th of June 1829, and two months later, Perth was also founded.

 

On this day …….. 26th April 2003

An unnamed Perth man was lucky to escape unharmed on the 26th April 2003 when he attempted to recharge his mobile phone battery in a microwave oven. Firefights were called to the man’s house after the battery exploded.

 

On this day …….. 21st of April 1970

The Hutt River Province Principality is a large farming property about 595 km north of Perth, Western Australia, and is about 75 square km in size. It was founded on 21 April 1970 by farmer Leonard George Casley when he and his family and associates proclaimed their secession from Western Australia. The year 1969 saw the climax of a long-running dispute between Casley and the Western Australian government over what Casley believed to be unreasonable wheat quotas which would spell ruin for his farm, family and business. Casley resorted to an apparent provision in British common law which he felt allowed him to secede and declare independence from the Commonwealth of Australia. Casley was elected administrator of the new “sovereign state” by his family and later became the self-styled His Royal Highness Prince Leonard of Hutt. Exports of the principality include wildflowers, agricultural produce, stamps and coins, while tourism is also important to its economy. Although actual residents are very few, it claims to have a world-wide citizenship of 13,000. Neither Australia nor any other nation has acknowledged recognition of the Province publicly.

 

On This Day …..14th April 2007

Ella Murphy was mauled by the huge animal – said to weigh more than 300kg – as she was standing on her surfboard being towed behind a boat on Friday at Lancelin, a small fishing town 110km north of Perth. The sea lion jumped from the water and went for her throat. It narrowly missed inflicting fatal injuries. It was coming back to strike again when the boat’s driver managed to get the boat between them and drag her to safety. The young surfer had a hole gashed under her chin, her jaw fractured and three teeth knocked out. Her mother, Michelle Forbes, said Ella was just millimetres from death. “It was quite close to her carotid artery, we could have lost her,” she said. The boat driver, family friend Chris Thomas, 40, told how he thought she would die in the attack. “You can only describe it as like a white-pointer jumping out of the water,” he said. “It was really sort of movie-like. “She popped up, and its head popped up out of the water about 10m away. “I had this horrible feeling I was not going to make it back in time.” Ella was in a stable condition last night after surgery in Perth’s Princess Margaret Hospital.