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1) Australians spread about 1.2 billion serves of Vegemite on toast, bread or biscuits every year. If this was all placed end to end, it would go around the world three times.

2) 235 jars of Vegemite can be produced every minute at Kraft Foods’ Port Melbourne manufacturing facility. That’s 338,400 jars a day.

3) Over 22 million jars of Vegemite are sold every year.

4) 30 jars of Vegemite are sold in Australia for every one that is exported.

5) Yeast is one of the world’s richest known sources of B group vitamins, especially thiamin, riboflavin and niacin. These vitamins can be found in Vegemite. A thin spread of Vegemite will supply between a third and two thirds of a seven year old child’s daily requirements. For adults, it supplies between a quarter and a half. B group vitamins are essential in the body’s use of proteins, carbohydrates and fats, which assists your body to be strong and have energy.

6) One serving of about a teaspoon or five grams of Vegemite has 50% of the recommended daily allowance (RDA) of folate, which is an important nutrient, especially for women trying to get pregnant. Women who take the RDA of folic acid, prior to getting pregnant, have a much lower incidence of bearing children with a variety of birth defects.

7) All Vegemite is produced in Kraft’s factory at Port Melbourne, Victoria.

8) Vegemite was referenced in the lyrics of the 1982 worldwide song “Down Under” by Men at Work. It is also the most watched overseas Australian song on You-tube.

9) Vegemite recently sold out in Hong Kong supermarkets due to high demand in the Asian region. Apparently, the demand for Vegemite stems from the black spread being rated “Umami” – a Japanese word that literally evokes a fifth sense of utmost deliciousness. The Japanese have also re-named Vegemite ‘bejimaito’.

10) Vegemite first arrived in Australian shops in 1923 in a jar shaped like a lighthouse.

11) In 1922 food entrepreneur Fred Walker asked chemist Cyril P. Callister to make the yeast product more acceptable so it could compete against the British version Marmite.

12) In 1928 falling sales, it was released with a new name: Pawill. This was a play on words with the competition: ‘If Marmite … then Pawill’. It was still not widely accepted until the name was changed back.

13) Vegemite was included in soldiers’ rations during World War Two and there was a big marketing campaign.

ON THIS DAY – July 5, 1894 

A short account was given last week of the supposed murder of a young woman named Minnie Hicks, aged 23, by Frederick Jordan, negro wharf labourer. She kept house for Jordan and Albert Johnson, at Sydney-place, and was last seen alive at the house occupied by a glassblower named Charles Turnbull and his mistress. This was at midnight on July 5. Next morning Jordan reported to the police that he had found her dead at 7 a.m. in the room he himself slept in, and he had no knowledge how she arrived there. Turnbull, however, put a different complexion on the case, stating that Jordan came to his place after the woman, found her tipsy, began beating her, and when remonstrated with dragged her off home. An examination of the body showed that she had died from the effects of severe beating about the head and body. It has since transpired that Minnie Hicks was married in 1888, at the age of 17, to a man now living at St. Kilda. They parted about 1890, through the wife taking to drink, and she left their one child with the father. About two years ago she took up with Jordan, who was often cruel to her. On the night preceding the fatality Jordan was hunting round the hotels for her, in the company of Charles Champ, wharf labourer, until nearly midnight. They then separated at Champ’s house, and Jordon went off to Turnbulls where he found the woman. The police in examining the premises discovered in the same room as the body a pair of trousers which were blood stained and torn. At the inquest on Tuesday Johnson gave evidence. All he knew was that on Thursday, July 5, Jordan told him not to give the woman money, as she would be sure to spend it on drink. In the afternoon she got 6s. from him to buy provisions for tea and came back with them, after which she left. Other witnesses showed that Jordan went to several public houses looking for the girl, who had got her friends to promise not to tell-of her whereabouts. Jordan ultimately found her at midnight and dragged her home. The man she married six years ago, Henry Crabtree, labourer, St. Kilda, said that she left him in November, 1891, having become a confirmed drunkard. He was a teetotaller. It appears that after being some time with Jordan, Minnie Hicks had shown a liking for another negro named Adam, and stayed with him. The society of the locality was proved to be anything but nice, and one or two of the women called owned to having been drinking with Minnie. The jury found that Jordan had committed wilful murder.

ON THIS DAY ……. 8th April 1931

PORT MELBOURNE

MAN ON MURDER CHARGE.

The mystery of a woman’s body, found in a cupboard at Thomas Garrity’s fish shop, in Bay-street, Port Melbourne, on this day in 1931, was related to the jury and Mr. Justice MaeFarlane, in the Criminal Court, when Garrity was charged with having murdered. Mrs. Rose Harvey, 51. The Crown Prosecutor said Mrs. Harvey died from severe head injuries, inflicted by a hard instrument or a kick. On the day before the murder, she had several drinks with Garrity in a city hotel, and later they went to Garrity’s shop. At midnight a man heard the voices of a man and woman in the shop, and half an hour later a constable was passing the shop when he saw shadows on the glass partition. The shadow were of a man and woman struggling. The man had hold of the woman’s throat, and he saw her tear the man’s hands away. Some hours later Garrity asked taxi-driver to dispose of a body for him. He said he had found the body dumped on his premises after two men and a woman had left his shop. The taxi-driver took Garrity to the police station, and Garrity told the police. that lie was drugged by people, who were in his shop, and found the body when he woke up. The Crown Prosecutor said the evidence pointed to Garrity striking Mrs. Harvey dragging her body upstairs, bringing it down again, placing it the washhouse, and then in the cupboard. Cross-examined. Dr. Hart, who, was called by the police to examine the body before it was moved from the cupboard, said it would have been very difficult for one man to have placed the body in the position in which it was found. The hearing was adjourned.

 

ON THIS DAY…… 28th November 1934

Death of Dick Hart – Kelly gang

One of the most important players in the Kelly drama died on this day in 1934. Dick Hart was Steve Hart’s brother. It was he who took charge of the bodies of Steve Hart and Dan Kelly after fire at the Glenrown Inn, and deified the police to take them for an inquest. After the Siege at Glenrown, North East Victoria, Dick joined forces briefly with Wild Wright to keep the spirit of the Kelly Outbreak alive but eventually turned to more business like pursuits in hotels in Melbourne and Ballarat. Dick died at the Albion Hotel, Port Melbourne aged 78.

On This Day – November 3, 1923

John Hanks, a elderly man employed as a watchman on the steamer Woolgar, at Port Melbourne, was strangled on board the vessel early on November 3. Aroused by screams, members of the crew rushed to the deck to find Hanks lying on the deck in a pool of blood. Life was extinct. It appeared that Hanks had invited a stranger aboard, and had spent an hour and a half in the galley, exchanging experiences and smoking. As the visitor, waa leaving, Hanks it is said, produced a revolver. The stranger knocked him down, and when the other men arrived on the scene, he was standing over Hanks’s body, his hands covered with blood.

Ragnar Dahlberg, aged 24 yean, a Swedish sailor, recently arrived in Australia, was arrested on a charge of having murdered Hanks.

ON THIS DAY – October 19, 1917

 

Alfred Edward Budd, 39 Stevedore’s labourer to-day, at the City Watch house, was formally charged with the murder of Annie Elizabeth Samson, at Princess Street, Port Melbourne, on October 19. Accused was the adopted brother of deceased, who was a married woman. He attempted to commit suicide by cutting his throat and was to-day taken from the Melbourne Hospital and transfered to the Melbourne gaol hospital.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – October 19, 1917

 

Alfred Edward Budd, 39 Stevedore’s labourer to-day, at the City Watch house, was formally charged with the murder of Annie Elizabeth Samson, at Princess Street, Port Melbourne, on October 19. Accused was the adopted brother of deceased, who was a married woman. He attempted to commit suicide by cutting his throat and was to-day taken from the Melbourne Hospital and transfered to the Melbourne gaol hospital.

 

 

On this day …….. 12th September 1854

With the discovery of gold in Victoria in 1851 Melbourne became the richest city in the world. With this Victoria became the first Australian state to have a completed railway line. Although South Australia had begun operations of horse-drawn trains on 18 May 1854 between Goolwa and Port Elliot, mechanical railways were first established in Victoria in 1854, with work on the line commencing in March 1853. At first, trains were ordered from Robert Stephenson and Company of the United Kingdom, but shipping delays meant that the first trains had to be built locally. Robertson, Martin and Smith built Australia’s first steam locomotive in ten weeks at a cost of £2700. The first steam train in Australia, consisting of two first-class carriages and one second-class carriage, made its maiden voyage on 12 September 1854. It ran along the four kilometre track from Flinders Street to Sandridge, now Port Melbourne, a ten-minute journey. Aboard the first train were Lieutenant-Governor Sir Charles Hotham and Lady Hotham. Upon arriving at its destination at Station Pier, the train was met with gun-salutes by the warships HMS Electra and HMS Fantome. The following year, the locomotives ordered from the UK arrived, and were named Melbourne, Sandridge, Victoria and Yarra.

 

On this day …….. 26th September 1855

Up until the mid-1800s, the horse and carriage remained the major means of transporting goods and people long distances overland. Victoria was the first colony to build a railway line, which ran from Melbourne’s Flinders Street Station and Port Melbourne, then called Sandridge. The line was opened on 12 September 1854. In 1849, the Sydney Railway Company started building the first railway track in New South Wales. It ran between Sydney and Parramatta, for a distance of 22 km. The construction suffered some setbacks, in particular financial difficulty, and was put on hold until taken over by the New South Wales colonial government. The line finally opened on 26 September 1855.

 

On This Day – August 12, 1895

The body of a little boy about two years old was found sunk in the lagoon dock at Port Melbourne on August 12. A piece of road metal 16lb. in weight was tied in the child’s apron, and strung round the body with tape. The police have discovered that the boy is the child of a Mrs. Williams, who has been leading an immoral life in the suburb since the death of her husband. The child has a singular life history, having been abandoned no loss than three times by its mother at various stages of its career. On one of these occasions the woman into whose charge it had fallen left it to the tender mercies of the State by placing it at the feet of Mr. Panton, the police magistrate. The last time the child was returned to its mother was on July 12. The woman Williams has been arrested. She treats the matter very lightly, declaring she is innocent of the murder, because she handed the child over to a Salvation Army woman at half-past 6 o’clock on Sunday evening.

1) Australians spread about 1.2 billion serves of Vegemite on toast, bread or biscuits every year. If this was all placed end to end, it would go around the world three times.

2) 235 jars of Vegemite can be produced every minute at Kraft Foods’ Port Melbourne manufacturing facility. That’s 338,400 jars a day.

3) Over 22 million jars of Vegemite are sold every year.

4) 30 jars of Vegemite are sold in Australia for every one that is exported.

5) Yeast is one of the world’s richest known sources of B group vitamins, especially thiamin, riboflavin and niacin. These vitamins can be found in Vegemite. A thin spread of Vegemite will supply between a third and two thirds of a seven year old child’s daily requirements. For adults, it supplies between a quarter and a half. B group vitamins are essential in the body’s use of proteins, carbohydrates and fats, which assists your body to be strong and have energy.

6) One serving of about a teaspoon or five grams of Vegemite has 50% of the recommended daily allowance (RDA) of folate, which is an important nutrient, especially for women trying to get pregnant. Women who take the RDA of folic acid, prior to getting pregnant, have a much lower incidence of bearing children with a variety of birth defects.

7) All Vegemite is produced in Kraft’s factory at Port Melbourne, Victoria.

8) Vegemite was referenced in the lyrics of the 1982 worldwide song “Down Under” by Men at Work. It is also the most watched overseas Australian song on You-tube.

9) Vegemite recently sold out in Hong Kong supermarkets due to high demand in the Asian region. Apparently, the demand for Vegemite stems from the black spread being rated “Umami” – a Japanese word that literally evokes a fifth sense of utmost deliciousness. The Japanese have also re-named Vegemite ‘bejimaito’.

10) Vegemite first arrived in Australian shops in 1923 in a jar shaped like a lighthouse.

11) In 1922 food entrepreneur Fred Walker asked chemist Cyril P. Callister to make the yeast product more acceptable so it could compete against the British version Marmite.

12) In 1928 falling sales, it was released with a new name: Pawill. This was a play on words with the competition: ‘If Marmite … then Pawill’. It was still not widely accepted until the name was changed back.

13) Vegemite was included in soldiers’ rations during World War Two and there was a big marketing campaign.

ON THIS DAY – July 5, 1894 

A short account was given last week of the supposed murder of a young woman named Minnie Hicks, aged 23, by Frederick Jordan, negro wharf labourer. She kept house for Jordan and Albert Johnson, at Sydney-place, and was last seen alive at the house occupied by a glassblower named Charles Turnbull and his mistress. This was at midnight on July 5. Next morning Jordan reported to the police that he had found her dead at 7 a.m. in the room he himself slept in, and he had no knowledge how she arrived there. Turnbull, however, put a different complexion on the case, stating that Jordan came to his place after the woman, found her tipsy, began beating her, and when remonstrated with dragged her off home. An examination of the body showed that she had died from the effects of severe beating about the head and body. It has since transpired that Minnie Hicks was married in 1888, at the age of 17, to a man now living at St. Kilda. They parted about 1890, through the wife taking to drink, and she left their one child with the father. About two years ago she took up with Jordan, who was often cruel to her. On the night preceding the fatality Jordan was hunting round the hotels for her, in the company of Charles Champ, wharf labourer, until nearly midnight. They then separated at Champ’s house, and Jordon went off to Turnbulls where he found the woman. The police in examining the premises discovered in the same room as the body a pair of trousers which were blood stained and torn. At the inquest on Tuesday Johnson gave evidence. All he knew was that on Thursday, July 5, Jordan told him not to give the woman money, as she would be sure to spend it on drink. In the afternoon she got 6s. from him to buy provisions for tea and came back with them, after which she left. Other witnesses showed that Jordan went to several public houses looking for the girl, who had got her friends to promise not to tell-of her whereabouts. Jordan ultimately found her at midnight and dragged her home. The man she married six years ago, Henry Crabtree, labourer, St. Kilda, said that she left him in November, 1891, having become a confirmed drunkard. He was a teetotaller. It appears that after being some time with Jordan, Minnie Hicks had shown a liking for another negro named Adam, and stayed with him. The society of the locality was proved to be anything but nice, and one or two of the women called owned to having been drinking with Minnie. The jury found that Jordan had committed wilful murder.