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On this day …….. 4th of June 1891

Moyhu in North East Victoria, revived an unexpected visitor from old time Bushranger Harry Power on this day. Power had been released from Pentridge Gaol due to ill health and was ready for a career in show bussiness. An old convict ship had been refitted to show what life was like on one of the old prison hulk on Port Phillip Bay. Harry was the official greeter of guests and was billed as “a real bushranger”. Harry had returned to Moyhu, he said to search for a plant of gold he had made some years earlier. He disappeared from the district, and reappeared in Swan Hill, where he died latter that year. Harry is buried in the Swan Hill cemetery.

On this day …….. 9th September 1803

The first European to discover Tasmania was Dutch trader Abel Tasman in November 1642. Tasman discovered the previously unknown island on his voyage past the “Great South Land”, which he later called “New Holland”. He named the island “Antony Van Diemen’s Land” in honour of the High Magistrate, or Governor-General of Batavia. After the arrival of the First Fleet in 1788, Captain Arthur Phillip claimed the entire eastern coast for the British Empire, including Van Diemen’s Land, though it was not yet known to be separate from the mainland. Tasman believed Van Diemen’s Land to be part of New Holland, and it was not until 1798-99 that Matthew Flinders and George Bass proved Van Diemen’s Land to be an island. In order to offset continuing French interests in southern parts of Australia, Lieutenant John Gordon Bowen was sent to establish the first British settlement in Van Diemen’s Land. The ship “Lady Nelson” arrived at Risdon Cove on 9 September 1803, and Bowen arrived on “The Albion” three days later to establish a settlement on the Derwent River. There were 49 people in the initial settlement party. Lieutenant-Governor David Collins, who had abandoned the new settlement at Sorrento on Port Phillip Bay due to lack of fresh water, arrived at Risdon Cove a month later. Unimpressed with the site chosen by Bowen, Collins moved the settlement to Sullivans Cove on the Derwent River in 1804. This settlement was later renamed Hobart Town.

 

On this day …….. 4th of June 1891

Moyhu in North East Victoria, revived an unexpected visitor from old time Bushranger Harry Power on this day. Power had been released from Pentridge Gaol due to ill health and was ready for a career in show bussiness. An old convict ship had been refitted to show what life was like on one of the old prison hulk on Port Phillip Bay. Harry was the official greeter of guests and was billed as “a real bushranger”. Harry had returned to Moyhu, he said to search for a plant of gold he had made some years earlier. He disappeared from the district, and reappeared in Swan Hill, where he died latter that year. Harry is buried in the Swan Hill cemetery.

On this day …….. 18th of April 1941

MELBOURNE CENTENARIAN

Miss Emma Sutton, who was born in Alfred-place, off Collins-street, Melbourne, 101 years ago (1840). Sutton died on this day at the home of her niece in Rouen-street, Hampton, where she had lived for 30 years. Miss Sutton was a daughter of Captain Thomas Halk Sutton the first pilot master in Port Phillip Bay. In the very early days of Willamstown she frequently witnessed aboriginal corroborees. Miss Sutton had enjoyed good health throughout her life.

On this day …….. 20th of January 1803

In 1802, Governor King, governor of the colony of New South Wales, sent acting lieutenant John Murray to survey Port Phillip Bay. Murray explored some parts of the Bay and was responsible for the discovery of Corio Bay, where Geelong now stands. However, when it was discovered that Murray had not served the full six years required by regulation when he passed his examination for lieutenant, he was unceremoniously dumped in disgrace. King then appointed Charles Grimes, the superintendent of public works at the Hawkesbury River, to complete the survey. Grimes entered Port Phillip Bay and arrived at Mornington Peninsula on this day in 1803. He was turned off the thought of settlement in the area due to the sandy soil and lack of water, and his report to Governor King reflected his adverse reaction. It is ironic that the Mornington Peninsula is now one of Victoria’s premier sites for both tourists and residents.

 

 

On this day …….. 9th September 1803

The first European to discover Tasmania was Dutch trader Abel Tasman in November 1642. Tasman discovered the previously unknown island on his voyage past the “Great South Land”, which he later called “New Holland”. He named the island “Antony Van Diemen’s Land” in honour of the High Magistrate, or Governor-General of Batavia. After the arrival of the First Fleet in 1788, Captain Arthur Phillip claimed the entire eastern coast for the British Empire, including Van Diemen’s Land, though it was not yet known to be separate from the mainland. Tasman believed Van Diemen’s Land to be part of New Holland, and it was not until 1798-99 that Matthew Flinders and George Bass proved Van Diemen’s Land to be an island. In order to offset continuing French interests in southern parts of Australia, Lieutenant John Gordon Bowen was sent to establish the first British settlement in Van Diemen’s Land. The ship “Lady Nelson” arrived at Risdon Cove on 9 September 1803, and Bowen arrived on “The Albion” three days later to establish a settlement on the Derwent River. There were 49 people in the initial settlement party. Lieutenant-Governor David Collins, who had abandoned the new settlement at Sorrento on Port Phillip Bay due to lack of fresh water, arrived at Risdon Cove a month later. Unimpressed with the site chosen by Bowen, Collins moved the settlement to Sullivans Cove on the Derwent River in 1804. This settlement was later renamed Hobart Town.

 

On this day …….. 4th of June 1891

Moyhu in North East Victoria, revived an unexpected visitor from old time Bushranger Harry Power on this day. Power had been released from Pentridge Gaol due to ill health and was ready for a career in show bussiness. An old convict ship had been refitted to show what life was like on one of the old prison hulk on Port Phillip Bay. Harry was the official greeter of guests and was billed as “a real bushranger”. Harry had returned to Moyhu, he said to search for a plant of gold he had made some years earlier. He disappeared from the district, and reappeared in Swan Hill, where he died latter that year. Harry is buried in the Swan Hill cemetery.

On this day …….. 18th of April 1941

MELBOURNE CENTENARIAN

Miss Emma Sutton, who was born in Alfred-place, off Collins-street, Melbourne, 101 years ago (1840). Sutton died on this day at the home of her niece in Rouen-street, Hampton, where she had lived for 30 years. Miss Sutton was a daughter of Captain Thomas Halk Sutton the first pilot master in Port Phillip Bay. In the very early days of Willamstown she frequently witnessed aboriginal corroborees. Miss Sutton had enjoyed good health throughout her life.

On this day …….. 20th of January 1803

In 1802, Governor King, governor of the colony of New South Wales, sent acting lieutenant John Murray to survey Port Phillip Bay. Murray explored some parts of the Bay and was responsible for the discovery of Corio Bay, where Geelong now stands. However, when it was discovered that Murray had not served the full six years required by regulation when he passed his examination for lieutenant, he was unceremoniously dumped in disgrace. King then appointed Charles Grimes, the superintendent of public works at the Hawkesbury River, to complete the survey. Grimes entered Port Phillip Bay and arrived at Mornington Peninsula on this day in 1803. He was turned off the thought of settlement in the area due to the sandy soil and lack of water, and his report to Governor King reflected his adverse reaction. It is ironic that the Mornington Peninsula is now one of Victoria’s premier sites for both tourists and residents.

 

 

A great story about Queenscliff from the 1930s involves the famous Australian painter Sidney Nolan. Nolan and a friend stowed away on a ship in Melbourne in 1934 hoping they could get a free passage to France. They decided that if they were caught they would insist they were missionaries who were trying to get to Tahiti to bring the gospel to the locals. Unfortunately neither Nolan nor his friend had a working knowledge of The Bible and neither of them had much of a desire to remain teetotal for the duration of the trip. They were discovered before the ship left Port Phillip, were removed and taken to Queenscliff where they were gaoled in the wooden lockup.

Whale in Port Phillip Bay12351006_220272108303925_804886758_n

Spouting, diving and lashing the water with its tail, a big whale disturbed fishing boats and seagulls at Williamstown on the 21st of July 1932. Many people lined the foreshores during the afternoon, and saw the whale cruising. Children shouted with delight as the visitor gave a rare exhibition of spouting.