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On this day …….. 4th of June 1789

The first theatrical performance in Australian took place on this day in 1789 in Sydney, when some prisoners performed George Farquhar’s comedy The Recruiting Officer to celebrate King George III’s birthday.

On This Day ……. 1st June 1927

Clive Frankston, aged 36 years, was charged on the 1st of the June 1926, with larceny and sentenced to two years in Pentradge. On the 28th April 1927, the Penal Authorities at Pentridge decided to transfer Frankston and another prisoner, Henry Tacke, to the Geelong Gaol. The two prisoners were escorted by Senior Constable Matthews and Constable Springfield, took the two prisoners from Pentridge Gaol to the Flinders street station in a prison van. Frankston was placed in a carriage on the Geelong train at No. 1 platform, and the two police officers returned to the van to carry Tacke, who was disabled by an injured leg, to the train. Upon reaching the carriage they found that’ Frankston was gone. Frankston seeing an opportunity to escaped from the carriage while the police escort was carring Tacke who was disabled to the police van out side the station. He dashed from the carriage and rushing through the ticket barrier and disappeared among the crowds in the street. On the 14th of May 1927, following up inquiries detectives raid a house in Napior street, Fitzroy owned by Frankstons wife. Inside Frankston was recaptured, he offered no resistance, he was so weak from illness that he could scarcely stand. He told the police that he was glad to get back to gaol and that he was suffering badly from consumption and that that he believed that the sea air at Geelong would kill him. Frankston received an extra 6 months to his sentence.

On this day …….. 18th of December 1891

PRISONER ON THE RUN

On the 18th of December 1891, a group of 11 prisoners were being transferred Melbourne Gaol to Geelong Gaol by train. While at Spencer street station it was noticed that one of the prisoners had escaped. The alarm was raised and the city police with wardens were dispatched, while the remainder of the prisoners were taken to Geelong.

ON THIS DAY…… 17th November 1900

Notorious gangster Percy Ramage starts fight

Two of three prisoners in the local gaol, Percy Ramage and Patrick Prendergast, quarrelled on this day in 1900, and a stand up fight resulted. The pair were brought before the visiting magistrate, and each was sentenced to seven days solitary confinement.

ON THIS DAY…… 14th November 1902

Five new convict arrive at Geelong gaol

Five prisoners of the vagrant class, under the escort, of two constables, arrived by the midday train from Melbourne on this day, and were taken to the Geelong gaol, where they will complete their sentences. The oldest of the batch is 83 years, and he claims to have fought in the Crimean war and the Indian Mutiny. The sentence lie will serve is three months, fob vagrancy.

ON THIS DAY…… 4th November 1922

Concerts at Geelong Gaol

Since the escape of Angus Murray from Geelong gaol there has been a ban on the fortnightly concerts that were formerly held in the gaol for the entertainment of the prisoners. The Inspector-General has now issued instructions that the concerts may again be held , and with the object of reverting to the former practice it has been decided to hold a concert on the afternoon of Saturday, November 10. The assistance of vocal and other artists is desired. Visitors will notice that the surroundings of the gaol have been improved, as the painters and decorators have renovated and decorated the interior of the building. Angus Murray’s cell has been repaired, and peace and order seem to again prevail. The prisoners’ choir master (Angus Murrray) will be succeeded by another prisoner who shows vocal power. It is not generally known that among the prisoners are several men who can contribute an entertainment.

HODDLE St killer Julian Knight is in line for a government payout for alleged abuse while serving as an Army cadet.

Knight, who infamously killed seven and wounded 19 people on this day in 1987 shooting rampage, wants the Department of Defence to pay him compensation for alleged abuse while a cadet. His bid was rejected by the Defence Department Abuse Tribunal in 2015 but the Federal Court the decision was now being reconsidered following an appeal by Knight. Emily Nans, for the Commonwealth, said the department would reconsider its policy of not paying compensation to prisoners or parolees. Ms Nans told the court that a decision would be made in the coming weeks. The decision could have wider implications and open the floodgates for other prisoners and parolees who were abused while in military service. Knight, flanked by two prison officers, appeared in person for the five-minute hearing. Apologising to Justice Mordy Bromberg for his dishevelled appearance, including prison-issue green tracksuit and runners, he said he had spent 90 minutes in shackles in the back of a prison van before court. He also explained he had spent the last seven months in solitary confinement at Geelong’s Barwon Prison. Knight, a vexatious litigant, did not object to an application to adjourn the hearing so the prisoner compensation policy could be reconsidered.
Knight claims he was assaulted at Duntroon while a cadet in 1987, and has blamed his killing spree on the alleged abuse.

Shannon Deery

 

On this day …….. 4th of June 1789

The first theatrical performance in Australian took place on this day in 1789 in Sydney, when some prisoners performed George Farquhar’s comedy The Recruiting Officer to celebrate King George III’s birthday.

On This Day ……. 1st June 1927

Clive Frankston, aged 36 years, was charged on the 1st of the June 1926, with larceny and sentenced to two years in Pentradge. On the 28th April 1927, the Penal Authorities at Pentridge decided to transfer Frankston and another prisoner, Henry Tacke, to the Geelong Gaol. The two prisoners were escorted by Senior Constable Matthews and Constable Springfield, took the two prisoners from Pentridge Gaol to the Flinders street station in a prison van. Frankston was placed in a carriage on the Geelong train at No. 1 platform, and the two police officers returned to the van to carry Tacke, who was disabled by an injured leg, to the train. Upon reaching the carriage they found that’ Frankston was gone. Frankston seeing an opportunity to escaped from the carriage while the police escort was carring Tacke who was disabled to the police van out side the station. He dashed from the carriage and rushing through the ticket barrier and disappeared among the crowds in the street. On the 14th of May 1927, following up inquiries detectives raid a house in Napior street, Fitzroy owned by Frankstons wife. Inside Frankston was recaptured, he offered no resistance, he was so weak from illness that he could scarcely stand. He told the police that he was glad to get back to gaol and that he was suffering badly from consumption and that that he believed that the sea air at Geelong would kill him. Frankston received an extra 6 months to his sentence.

On This Day ……. 15th May 1906

Charges were formulated on this day in 1906, against Robert Barker, a warder from the Geelong Gaol, who is was under suspension from duty, in relation to communicating with relatives of a prisoner under his charge and carrying from prisoners in gaol to friends outside.

 

On This Day ……. 8th May 1912

The prisoner Condor, alias Malone, who gave the police a lot of trouble was sentenced on several charges of misbehaviour, was conveyed to “Pentridge from Geelong gaol to serve his term. An old identity named Sammy Bywater alias Percy Ramage was removed from the Geelong gaol to the infirm prisoners’ home at St. Kilda road.

 

EXECUTION ON THIS DAY………….30th April 1847

EXECUTION TWO ABORIGINALS

The sad penalty of the law was carried into effect upon Ptolemy and Bobby, the two unfortunate Murray blacks, convicted as the principals in the lamentable murder of the late Mr. Andrew Beveridge, jun. As we stated in our last, ever since the announcement of their doom to them, the culprits evinced a keen sense of their situation—Ptolemy bore it with much strength of mind, but it was too much for Bobby. Day after day he pined away in his cell, and grew more nervous to the last moment. The attentions of Mr. Protector Thomas worked a considerable improvement in the minds of the ill-fated beings. They fully felt their fate, and began to entertain a dim idea of an all-seeing Providence. On the morning of their execution, both appeared to be extremely ill at ease, and the workings of their muscles evidently betrayed the inward operations of their feelings: Bobby especially seemed unmanned. At the usual hour, the fatal procession left the “condemned cells,” and advanced on its fatal journey to the tread-mill yard, where the gallows was erected. The prisoners were attended by Messrs. Thomas, French, and Lacey, the latter having acted as one of the interpreters on their trial, and when they arrived at the foot of the scaffold, they appeared to be much distressed. Both burst out crying, and could scarcely be restrained. Previous to the pinioning, Mr. Thomas read prayers, and as well as he could endeavoured to impress them with the nature of the awful proceedings. On ascending the ladder, Bobby was scarcely able to stand, and required the assistance of Mr. French. Ptolemy, though completely exhausted, possessed much more presence of mind than his companion. On mounting the platform, Bobby could not face the crowd congregated outside, and turned round, but Ptolemy stood, as if in the calmness of death awaiting the moment when he was to plunge into the abyss of eternity. The executioner was, however, busy at his work, the ropes were adjusted, the caps were drawn down, the bolt was pushed, and the drop fell. Ptolemy expired instanter, without a struggle, his neck being broken in the shock. Not so with Bobby, as when the drop fell, he endeavoured, as a last effort for life, to get his foot on a portion of the platform. This broke his fall, and almost turned him head over heels, in consequence of which his struggles were protracted and severe. After hanging the usual length of time, the bodies were cut down, coffined, and interred. A number of persons were present, including many aboriginals, and a majority of women. This is highly disgraceful, but there is no use in remonstrating, the female sex must have its way, despite public opinion, the press, or even the dictates of every principle consonant with humanity.