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On this day …….. 12th of April 1865

The notorious bushranger Dan Morgan was the centre of attention in Wangaratta on this day in 1865. In response to many request, his body was put on public display in one of the police cells. Someone took a fancy to Morgan’s bushy beard, and it was flayed off. Someone suggested his head might be useful to Professor Halford at Melbourne University, so it was detached and wrapped in hessian for the trip to Melbourne. Morgan genitals were removed and made into a snuff box. The officials in Wangaratta who took liberties with Morgan’s body had some explaining to do, and were suspended from duty. Morgan is buried in Wangaratta cemetery.

 

On This Day……… 9th April 1865

The notorious bushranger Dan Morgan was shot on this day in 1865, at a homestead at Peechelba. He layed wounded for a number of hours with out medical attention, before dying at 2:15pm. His body was taken to the woolshed, and placed on public display. Photographers from Beechworth and Chiltern arrived and took photos of his corpse. John Wendlan, the man who shot him also had his photo taken. Pieces of Morgan’s beard and hair began to disappear to souvenir hunters.

 

 

The Shark Arm case refers to a series of incidents that began in Sydney, Australia on the 25th of April 1935 when a human arm was regurgitated by a captive 3.5-metre tiger shark, subsequently leading to a murder investigation.

The tiger shark had been caught 3 kilometres from the beach suburb of Coogee in mid-April and transferred to the Coogee Aquarium Baths, where it was put on public display. Within a week the fish became ill and vomited in front of a small crowd, leaving the left forearm of a man bearing a distinctive tattoo floating in the pool. Before it was captured, the tiger shark had devoured a smaller shark. It was this smaller shark that had originally swallowed the human arm.

Fingerprints lifted from the hand identified the arm as that of former boxer and small-time criminal James (Jim) Smith, (born England, 1890), who had been missing since April 7, 1935. Smith’s arm and tattoo were also positively identified by his wife Gladys and his brother Edward Smith. Jim Smith led a high-risk lifestyle, as he was also a police informer. Examination revealed that the limb had been severed with a knife, which led to a murder investigation. Three days later, the aquarium owners killed the shark and gutted it, hampering the initial police investigation.

Early inquiries correctly led police to a Sydney businessman named Reginald William Lloyd Holmes (1892-1935). Holmes was a fraudster and smuggler who also ran a successful family boat-building business at Lavender Bay, New South Wales. Holmes had employed Smith several times to work insurance scams, including one in 1934 in which an over-insured pleasure cruiser named Pathfinder was sunk near Terrigal, New South Wales. Shortly afterward, the pair began a racket with Patrick Francis Brady (1889-1965), a convicted forger and ex-serviceman. With specimen signatures from Holmes’ friends and clients provided by the boat-builder, Brady would forge cheques for small amounts against their bank accounts that he and Smith would then cash. Police were later able to establish that Jim Smith was blackmailing the wealthy Reginald Holmes.

 

On this day …….. 12th of April 1865

The notorious bushranger Dan Morgan was the centre of attention in Wangaratta on this day in 1865. In response to many request, his body was put on public display in one of the police cells. Someone took a fancy to Morgan’s bushy beard, and it was flayed off. Someone suggested his head might be useful to Professor Halford at Melbourne University, so it was detached and wrapped in hessian for the trip to Melbourne. Morgan genitals were removed and made into a snuff box. The officials in Wangaratta who took liberties with Morgan’s body had some explaining to do, and were suspended from duty. Morgan is buried in Wangaratta cemetery.

 

On This Day……… 9th April 1865

The notorious bushranger Dan Morgan was shot on this day in 1865, at a homestead at Peechelba. He layed wounded for a number of hours with out medical attention, before dying at 2:15pm. His body was taken to the woolshed, and placed on public display. Photographers from Beechworth and Chiltern arrived and took photos of his corps. John Wendlan, the man who shot him also had his photo taken. Pieces of Morgan’s beard and hair began to disappear to souvenir hunters.

 

 

The Shark Arm case refers to a series of incidents that began in Sydney, Australia on the 25th of April 1935 when a human arm was regurgitated by a captive 3.5-metre tiger shark, subsequently leading to a murder investigation.

The tiger shark had been caught 3 kilometres from the beach suburb of Coogee in mid-April and transferred to the Coogee Aquarium Baths, where it was put on public display. Within a week the fish became ill and vomited in front of a small crowd, leaving the left forearm of a man bearing a distinctive tattoo floating in the pool. Before it was captured, the tiger shark had devoured a smaller shark. It was this smaller shark that had originally swallowed the human arm.

Fingerprints lifted from the hand identified the arm as that of former boxer and small-time criminal James (Jim) Smith, (born England, 1890), who had been missing since April 7, 1935. Smith’s arm and tattoo were also positively identified by his wife Gladys and his brother Edward Smith. Jim Smith led a high-risk lifestyle, as he was also a police informer. Examination revealed that the limb had been severed with a knife, which led to a murder investigation. Three days later, the aquarium owners killed the shark and gutted it, hampering the initial police investigation.

Early inquiries correctly led police to a Sydney businessman named Reginald William Lloyd Holmes (1892-1935). Holmes was a fraudster and smuggler who also ran a successful family boat-building business at Lavender Bay, New South Wales. Holmes had employed Smith several times to work insurance scams, including one in 1934 in which an over-insured pleasure cruiser named Pathfinder was sunk near Terrigal, New South Wales. Shortly afterward, the pair began a racket with Patrick Francis Brady (1889-1965), a convicted forger and ex-serviceman. With specimen signatures from Holmes’ friends and clients provided by the boat-builder, Brady would forge cheques for small amounts against their bank accounts that he and Smith would then cash. Police were later able to establish that Jim Smith was blackmailing the wealthy Reginald Holmes.

 

On this day …….. 12th of April 1865

The notorious bushranger Dan Morgan was the centre of attention in Wangaratta on this day in 1865. In response to many request, his body was put on public display in one of the police cells. Someone took a fancy to Morgan’s bushy beard, and it was flayed off. Someone suggested his head might be useful to Professor Halford at Melbourne University, so it was detached and wrapped in hessian for the trip to Melbourne. Morgan genitals were removed and made into a snuff box. The officials in Wangaratta who took liberties with Morgan’s body had some explaining to do, and were suspended from duty. Morgan is buried in Wangaratta cemetery.

 

On This Day……… 9th April 1865

The notorious bushranger Dan Morgan was shot on this day in 1865, at a homestead at Peechelba. He layed wounded for a number of hours with out medical attention, before dying at 2:15pm. His body was taken to the woolshed, and placed on public display. Photographers from Beechworth and Chiltern arrived and took photos of his corps. John Wendlan, the man who shot him also had his photo taken. Pieces of Morgan’s beard and hair began to disappear to souvenir hunters.