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Shaken not stirred…… We all have a preference …. But how do you like you Martini. 10 celebrities share there favourite.

1. James Bond. In Ian Fleming’s Casino Royale, Bond orders the drink like this: “Three measures of Gordon’s, one of vodka, half a measure of Kina Lillet. Shake it very well until it’s ice-cold, then add a large thin slice of lemon peel.” Since the 1953 novel, though, Kina Lillet is no longer available… however, that doesn’t stop Daniel Craig from ordering it that way in the 2006 movie. Today, if you order a Vesper (the offical name of the James Bond martini), Lillet Blanc is typically substituted. Also, the “shaken, not stirred” method will really spark an argument among martini purists – many believe that shaking it bruises the gin and maims the integrity of the cocktail.

2. Winston Churchill. If you order a Churchill Martini, you’ll end up with a glassful of gin. Churchhill famously said the only way to make a martini was with ice-cold gin, and a bow in the direction of France.

3. Ernest Hemingway favored the Montgomery – 15 parts gin to 1 part vermouth. 15:1 is said to be the ratio Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery preferred when going into battle.

4. Lyndon B. Johnson liked the in-and-out martini – a glass filled with vermouth, then dumped out and filled with gin.

5. Alfred Hitchcock and Winston Churchill had the same idea – Hitch said the closest he wanted to get to a bottle of vermouth was looking at it from across the room. That quote is often attributed to Churchill, actually, but the Washington Post says otherwise… Churchill is misquoted all of the time, so I’m inclined to believe them.

6. Clark Gable’s character in the 1958 movie Teacher’s Pet likes to take the bottle of vermouth, tip it upside down so the liquid wets the cork, and then run the damp cork around the lip of the martini glass.

7. FDR absolutely loved martinis and is rumored to have carried a “martini kit” with him wherever he went. His recipe was two parts gin, one part vermouth, some olive brine, a lemon twist and an olive. He insisted on mixing his concoction for Stalin at the Teheran conference. Stalin found it “cold on the stomach” but tasty.

8. Julia Child preferred reverse martinis: a glass full of vermouth on the rocks (she liked Noilly Prat) with a topper of gin. She said she could easily down two of those.

9. Queen Elizabeth II likes Gordon’s gin with three slices of lemon. She may have gotten her taste for gin from her mom – the Queen Mother once requested that two bottles of Dubonnet and gin be packed for an outing, “in case it is needed.” The note she wrote to an aide requesting the booze sold at an auction for $32,000 in July.

10. W.C. Fields reportedly liked to start his day with a couple of double martinis in the morning – one before breakfast and one after.

Richard Nixon liked his martinis, but several sources say he couldn’t handle them very well. He liked the ratio to be about seven parts gin to one part vermouth.

Gough Whitlam the 21st Prime Minister of Australia is only one of two Prime Ministers whose lifetime spanned the lives of all 25 Prime Ministers in Australia’s first century (John Gorton was the other) Whitlam was Australia’s longest-lived Prime Minister, dying at the age of 98 years, sadly 2 years short of receiving a 100th birthday card from Queen Elizabeth II, the woman who sacked him and his government in 1975.

The Royal Queen’s Scones

Ingredients:
8 oz. flour
2 oz. margarine
2 oz. sugar
2 oz. currants
1 egg for mixing
Small amount of milk (optional)
1 tsp. of cream of tartar
1/4 tsp. of salt
1/2 tsp. baking soda
Egg to glaze

Directions
1. Make a soft dough by mixing the ingredients, including the egg and a little milk if necessary.

2. Place on a lightly floured board and gently roll or pat out the dough to a thickness of about 3/4-in. to 1-in. Using a small plain cutter, cut out the scones and put them in a greased tin, making sure they are well spaced out. Brush them over with a smear of beaten egg and bake in a hot oven (450 F) for about 10 minutes.

The tradition of having goats in the military originated in 1775, when a wild goat walked onto the battlefield in Boston during the American Revolutionary War and led the Welsh regimental colours at the end of the Battle of Bunker Hill. Another Welsh military goat, Taffy IV, served in the First World War. Taffy, of 2nd Battalion, Welsh Regiment, is officially recorded as “The Regimental Goat”. He embarked for the war on 13 August 1914 and saw action in the Retreat from Mons, the First Battle of Ypres (including the Battle of Gheluvelt) and the Battles of Festubert and Givenchy, before dying on 20 January 1915. He was posthumously awarded the 1914 Star, British War Medal and the Victory Medal.

The royal goat herd was originally obtained from Mohammad Shah Qajar, Shah of Persia from 1834 to 1848, when he presented them to Queen Victoria as a gift in 1837 upon her accession to the throne.

The herd thrived on Llandudno’s Great Orme; by 2001 they reached a population of 250, and were in danger of running out of food. Following complaints about goats wandering into people’s gardens, the council rejected proposals for a cull, deciding to use a combination of rehoming and birth control. RSPCA marksmen tranquilised nannies and inserted contraceptive progesterone implants to control the numbers of the genetically unique breed. By 2007, 85 goats had been relocated to areas including Kent, Yorkshire, the Brecon Beacons and Somerset, but further efforts were interrupted by an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease.

William Windsor I

Billy, a Kashmir goat, is descended from the same royal bloodline as the original herd, but was not selected from the wild population; he was born in Whipsnade Zoo. He was presented to the regiment by Queen Elizabeth II in 2001. The tradition is not new: since 1844, the British monarchy has presented an unbroken series of Kashmir goats to the Royal Welch Fusiliers from the Crown’s own royal herd.

Billy—Army number 25232301—is “not a mascot, but a ranking member of the regiment”, according to the BBC. Since joining in 2001, he has performed duties overseas, and has paraded before royalty. His primary duty was to march at the head of the battalion on all ceremonial duties. He was present for every parade in which the regiment participated. Billy’s full-time handler was Lance Corporal Ryan Arthur, who carried the title of “Goat Major”.
Another regimental goat: Taffy IV, of the 2nd Battalion of the Welsh Regiment, was on active duty in France during World War I, participating in the Retreat from Mons, the First Battle of Ypres and other famous battles. He was awarded the 1914 Star.

Temporary demotion

On 16 June 2006, a parade was held to celebrate Queen Elizabeth II’s 80th birthday, at the Episkopi base near Limassol, Cyprus on the Mediterranean island’s south coast. Invited dignitaries included the ambassadors of Spain, the Netherlands and Sweden and the Argentine commander of United Nations’ forces on Cyprus.

The deployment to Cyprus with the 1st Battalion was Billy’s first overseas posting, and despite being ordered to keep in line, he refused to obey. He failed to keep in step, and tried to headbutt a drummer. The goat major, Lance Corporal Dai Davies, 22, from Neath, South Wales, was unable to keep him under control.

Billy was charged with “unacceptable behaviour”, “lack of decorum” and “disobeying a direct order”, and had to appear before his commanding officer, Lieutenant-Colonel Huw James. Following a disciplinary hearing, he was demoted to fusilier. The change meant that other fusiliers in the regiment no longer had to stand to attention when Billy walked past, as they had to when he was a lance corporal.

A Canadian animal rights group protested to the British Army, stating that he was merely “acting the goat”, and should be reinstated. Three months later, on 20 September at the same parade ground, Billy regained his rank during the Alma Day parade which celebrates the Royal Welsh victory in the Crimean War. Captain Simon Clarke said, “Billy performed exceptionally well, he has had all summer to reflect on his behaviour at the Queen’s birthday and clearly earned the rank he deserves”.

Billy received his promotion from the colonel of the Royal Welsh Regiment, Brigadier Roderick Porter. As a result of regaining his rank, he also regained his membership of the corporals’ mess.

Billy is not the first goat in the army to have troubles. At one time a royal goat was “prostituted” by being offered for stud services by the regiment’s serving goat major to a Wrexham goat breeder. First charged with lèse majesté, the goat major was ultimately court-martialled under the lesser charge of “disrespect to an officer” and reduced in rank. The goat major claimed he did it out of compassion for the goat, but this failed to impress the court. Another royal fusilier goat earned the nickname “the rebel”, after he butted a colonel while he was stooped over fixing his uniform’s trouser-strap. The incident was described as a “disgraceful act of insubordination.”

Retirement

On 20 May 2009, following eight years of distinguished service, Billy retired due to his age. Soldiers from the battalion lined the route from his pen to the trailer as he left the camp for the last time, in ceremonial dress that included a silver headdress which was a gift from the queen in 1955. Billy was taken to Whipsnade Zoo in Bedfordshire where keepers say he had an easy life at the Children’s Farm.

William Windsor II

In order to replace Billy, thirty members of 1st Battalion set off to Great Orme in Llandudno on 15 June 2009 at 03:00, hoping to catch the feral goats in a docile state. A team led by Lieutenant-Colonel Nick Lock (Commanding Officer) included the goat major and several veterinarians. Army spokesman Gavin O’Connor said, “We are looking for a goat which is calm under pressure and a team player”. During the selection of a replacement goat, the battalion helped to start an alternative vaccine method of birth control among the herd, since hormone implants that were previously employed to control numbers are no longer available.

With some difficulty, a five-month-old was chosen, and assigned army number 25142301—which represents regiment number 2514, 23rd Regiment of Foot (the original name of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers), and 01 denoting the 1st Battalion. The new goat will also be called William Windsor, beginning as a fusilier while being trained for military life. He will receive a ration of two cigarettes per day, which he eats, but will not be permitted Guinness until he is older.

 

On this day …….. 28th September 1973

The Sydney Opera House in Sydney, Australia, sits on Bennelong Point in Sydney Harbour. Designed by Danish architect Joern Utzon in 1955, it has become one of the most famous performing arts venues in the world. Utzon arrived in Sydney to oversee the project in 1957 and work commenced on the opera House in 1959. The building was completed in 1973, at a cost of $102 million, and formally opened by Queen Elizabeth II on 20 October 1973. The opening was celebrated with fireworks and a performance of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9. Prior to this, however, Sergei Prokofiev’s ‘War and Peace’ was played at the Opera Theatre on 28 September 1973. The following day, the first public performance was held, with a programme performed by the Sydney Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Charles Mackerras and with accompanying singer Birgit Nilsson.

 

Shaken not stirred…… We all have a preference …. But how do you like you Martini. 10 celebrities share there favourite.

1. James Bond. In Ian Fleming’s Casino Royale, Bond orders the drink like this: “Three measures of Gordon’s, one of vodka, half a measure of Kina Lillet. Shake it very well until it’s ice-cold, then add a large thin slice of lemon peel.” Since the 1953 novel, though, Kina Lillet is no longer available… however, that doesn’t stop Daniel Craig from ordering it that way in the 2006 movie. Today, if you order a Vesper (the offical name of the James Bond martini), Lillet Blanc is typically substituted. Also, the “shaken, not stirred” method will really spark an argument among martini purists – many believe that shaking it bruises the gin and maims the integrity of the cocktail.

2. Winston Churchill. If you order a Churchill Martini, you’ll end up with a glassful of gin. Churchhill famously said the only way to make a martini was with ice-cold gin, and a bow in the direction of France.

3. Ernest Hemingway favored the Montgomery – 15 parts gin to 1 part vermouth. 15:1 is said to be the ratio Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery preferred when going into battle.

4. Lyndon B. Johnson liked the in-and-out martini – a glass filled with vermouth, then dumped out and filled with gin.

5. Alfred Hitchcock and Winston Churchill had the same idea – Hitch said the closest he wanted to get to a bottle of vermouth was looking at it from across the room. That quote is often attributed to Churchill, actually, but the Washington Post says otherwise… Churchill is misquoted all of the time, so I’m inclined to believe them.

6. Clark Gable’s character in the 1958 movie Teacher’s Pet likes to take the bottle of vermouth, tip it upside down so the liquid wets the cork, and then run the damp cork around the lip of the martini glass.

7. FDR absolutely loved martinis and is rumored to have carried a “martini kit” with him wherever he went. His recipe was two parts gin, one part vermouth, some olive brine, a lemon twist and an olive. He insisted on mixing his concoction for Stalin at the Teheran conference. Stalin found it “cold on the stomach” but tasty.

8. Julia Child preferred reverse martinis: a glass full of vermouth on the rocks (she liked Noilly Prat) with a topper of gin. She said she could easily down two of those.

9. Queen Elizabeth II likes Gordon’s gin with three slices of lemon. She may have gotten her taste for gin from her mom – the Queen Mother once requested that two bottles of Dubonnet and gin be packed for an outing, “in case it is needed.” The note she wrote to an aide requesting the booze sold at an auction for $32,000 in July.

10. W.C. Fields reportedly liked to start his day with a couple of double martinis in the morning – one before breakfast and one after.

Richard Nixon liked his martinis, but several sources say he couldn’t handle them very well. He liked the ratio to be about seven parts gin to one part vermouth.

Gough Whitlam the 21st Prime Minister of Australia is only one of two Prime Ministers whose lifetime spanned the lives of all 25 Prime Ministers in Australia’s first century (John Gorton was the other) Whitlam was Australia’s longest-lived Prime Minister, dying at the age of 98 years, sadly 2 years short of receiving a 100th birthday card from Queen Elizabeth II, the woman who sacked him and his government in 1975.

The Royal Queen’s Scones

Ingredients:
8 oz. flour
2 oz. margarine
2 oz. sugar
2 oz. currants
1 egg for mixing
Small amount of milk (optional)
1 tsp. of cream of tartar
1/4 tsp. of salt
1/2 tsp. baking soda
Egg to glaze

Directions
1. Make a soft dough by mixing the ingredients, including the egg and a little milk if necessary.

2. Place on a lightly floured board and gently roll or pat out the dough to a thickness of about 3/4-in. to 1-in. Using a small plain cutter, cut out the scones and put them in a greased tin, making sure they are well spaced out. Brush them over with a smear of beaten egg and bake in a hot oven (450 F) for about 10 minutes.

The tradition of having goats in the military originated in 1775, when a wild goat walked onto the battlefield in Boston during the American Revolutionary War and led the Welsh regimental colours at the end of the Battle of Bunker Hill. Another Welsh military goat, Taffy IV, served in the First World War. Taffy, of 2nd Battalion, Welsh Regiment, is officially recorded as “The Regimental Goat”. He embarked for the war on 13 August 1914 and saw action in the Retreat from Mons, the First Battle of Ypres (including the Battle of Gheluvelt) and the Battles of Festubert and Givenchy, before dying on 20 January 1915. He was posthumously awarded the 1914 Star, British War Medal and the Victory Medal.

The royal goat herd was originally obtained from Mohammad Shah Qajar, Shah of Persia from 1834 to 1848, when he presented them to Queen Victoria as a gift in 1837 upon her accession to the throne.

The herd thrived on Llandudno’s Great Orme; by 2001 they reached a population of 250, and were in danger of running out of food. Following complaints about goats wandering into people’s gardens, the council rejected proposals for a cull, deciding to use a combination of rehoming and birth control. RSPCA marksmen tranquilised nannies and inserted contraceptive progesterone implants to control the numbers of the genetically unique breed. By 2007, 85 goats had been relocated to areas including Kent, Yorkshire, the Brecon Beacons and Somerset, but further efforts were interrupted by an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease.

William Windsor I

Billy, a Kashmir goat, is descended from the same royal bloodline as the original herd, but was not selected from the wild population; he was born in Whipsnade Zoo. He was presented to the regiment by Queen Elizabeth II in 2001. The tradition is not new: since 1844, the British monarchy has presented an unbroken series of Kashmir goats to the Royal Welch Fusiliers from the Crown’s own royal herd.

Billy—Army number 25232301—is “not a mascot, but a ranking member of the regiment”, according to the BBC. Since joining in 2001, he has performed duties overseas, and has paraded before royalty. His primary duty was to march at the head of the battalion on all ceremonial duties. He was present for every parade in which the regiment participated. Billy’s full-time handler was Lance Corporal Ryan Arthur, who carried the title of “Goat Major”.
Another regimental goat: Taffy IV, of the 2nd Battalion of the Welsh Regiment, was on active duty in France during World War I, participating in the Retreat from Mons, the First Battle of Ypres and other famous battles. He was awarded the 1914 Star.

Temporary demotion

On 16 June 2006, a parade was held to celebrate Queen Elizabeth II’s 80th birthday, at the Episkopi base near Limassol, Cyprus on the Mediterranean island’s south coast. Invited dignitaries included the ambassadors of Spain, the Netherlands and Sweden and the Argentine commander of United Nations’ forces on Cyprus.

The deployment to Cyprus with the 1st Battalion was Billy’s first overseas posting, and despite being ordered to keep in line, he refused to obey. He failed to keep in step, and tried to headbutt a drummer. The goat major, Lance Corporal Dai Davies, 22, from Neath, South Wales, was unable to keep him under control.

Billy was charged with “unacceptable behaviour”, “lack of decorum” and “disobeying a direct order”, and had to appear before his commanding officer, Lieutenant-Colonel Huw James. Following a disciplinary hearing, he was demoted to fusilier. The change meant that other fusiliers in the regiment no longer had to stand to attention when Billy walked past, as they had to when he was a lance corporal.

A Canadian animal rights group protested to the British Army, stating that he was merely “acting the goat”, and should be reinstated. Three months later, on 20 September at the same parade ground, Billy regained his rank during the Alma Day parade which celebrates the Royal Welsh victory in the Crimean War. Captain Simon Clarke said, “Billy performed exceptionally well, he has had all summer to reflect on his behaviour at the Queen’s birthday and clearly earned the rank he deserves”.

Billy received his promotion from the colonel of the Royal Welsh Regiment, Brigadier Roderick Porter. As a result of regaining his rank, he also regained his membership of the corporals’ mess.

Billy is not the first goat in the army to have troubles. At one time a royal goat was “prostituted” by being offered for stud services by the regiment’s serving goat major to a Wrexham goat breeder. First charged with lèse majesté, the goat major was ultimately court-martialled under the lesser charge of “disrespect to an officer” and reduced in rank. The goat major claimed he did it out of compassion for the goat, but this failed to impress the court. Another royal fusilier goat earned the nickname “the rebel”, after he butted a colonel while he was stooped over fixing his uniform’s trouser-strap. The incident was described as a “disgraceful act of insubordination.”

Retirement

On 20 May 2009, following eight years of distinguished service, Billy retired due to his age. Soldiers from the battalion lined the route from his pen to the trailer as he left the camp for the last time, in ceremonial dress that included a silver headdress which was a gift from the queen in 1955. Billy was taken to Whipsnade Zoo in Bedfordshire where keepers say he had an easy life at the Children’s Farm.

William Windsor II

In order to replace Billy, thirty members of 1st Battalion set off to Great Orme in Llandudno on 15 June 2009 at 03:00, hoping to catch the feral goats in a docile state. A team led by Lieutenant-Colonel Nick Lock (Commanding Officer) included the goat major and several veterinarians. Army spokesman Gavin O’Connor said, “We are looking for a goat which is calm under pressure and a team player”. During the selection of a replacement goat, the battalion helped to start an alternative vaccine method of birth control among the herd, since hormone implants that were previously employed to control numbers are no longer available.

With some difficulty, a five-month-old was chosen, and assigned army number 25142301—which represents regiment number 2514, 23rd Regiment of Foot (the original name of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers), and 01 denoting the 1st Battalion. The new goat will also be called William Windsor, beginning as a fusilier while being trained for military life. He will receive a ration of two cigarettes per day, which he eats, but will not be permitted Guinness until he is older.

 

Queen Elizabeth II, merely has whole wheat toast with some light marmalade, and tea. Where Prince Philip has a much heartier meal because he likes a full British breakfast include eggs, bacon, toast and kippers.

Breakfast is served at 8:30 sharp in the Queen’s private, first floor apartment overlooking the Buckingham Palace gardens. Half an hour after breakfast is served, the Queen and Prince Philip are entertained by bagpipes. It is the continuation of a tradition started by Queen Victoria and which has continued uninterrupted (with a brief exception of WWII) until this day. In fact, it “is the principal duty of the Queen’s Piper to play every weekday at 9am for about 15 minutes when she is in residence at Buckingham Palace, Windsor, Edinburgh’s Holyroodhouse Palace or Balmoral Castle in the Scottish Highlands. The Queen is very knowledgeable about the pipes and notices the subtleties and any variations in the music.” See, “All in a Royal Day,” supra.

On this day …….. 28th September 1973

The Sydney Opera House in Sydney, Australia, sits on Bennelong Point in Sydney Harbour. Designed by Danish architect Joern Utzon in 1955, it has become one of the most famous performing arts venues in the world. Utzon arrived in Sydney to oversee the project in 1957 and work commenced on the opera House in 1959. The building was completed in 1973, at a cost of $102 million, and formally opened by Queen Elizabeth II on 20 October 1973. The opening was celebrated with fireworks and a performance of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9. Prior to this, however, Sergei Prokofiev’s ‘War and Peace’ was played at the Opera Theatre on 28 September 1973. The following day, the first public performance was held, with a programme performed by the Sydney Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Charles Mackerras and with accompanying singer Birgit Nilsson.

 

Shaken not stirred…… We all have a preference …. But how do you like you Martini. 10 celebrities share there favourite.
1. James Bond. In Ian Fleming’s Casino Royale, Bond orders the drink like this: “Three measures of Gordon’s, one of vodka, half a measure of Kina Lillet. Shake it very well until it’s ice-cold, then add a large thin slice of lemon peel.” Since the 1953 novel, though, Kina Lillet is no longer available… however, that doesn’t stop Daniel Craig from ordering it that way in the 2006 movie. Today, if you order a Vesper (the offical name of the James Bond martini), Lillet Blanc is typically substituted. Also, the “shaken, not stirred” method will really spark an argument among martini purists – many believe that shaking it bruises the gin and maims the integrity of the cocktail.

2. Winston Churchill. If you order a Churchill Martini, you’ll end up with a glassful of gin. Churchhill famously said the only way to make a martini was with ice-cold gin, and a bow in the direction of France.

3. Ernest Hemingway favored the Montgomery – 15 parts gin to 1 part vermouth. 15:1 is said to be the ratio Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery preferred when going into battle.

4. Lyndon B. Johnson liked the in-and-out martini – a glass filled with vermouth, then dumped out and filled with gin.

5. Alfred Hitchcock and Winston Churchill had the same idea – Hitch said the closest he wanted to get to a bottle of vermouth was looking at it from across the room. That quote is often attributed to Churchill, actually, but the Washington Post says otherwise… Churchill is misquoted all of the time, so I’m inclined to believe them.

6. Clark Gable’s character in the 1958 movie Teacher’s Pet likes to take the bottle of vermouth, tip it upside down so the liquid wets the cork, and then run the damp cork around the lip of the martini glass.

7. FDR absolutely loved martinis and is rumored to have carried a “martini kit” with him wherever he went. His recipe was two parts gin, one part vermouth, some olive brine, a lemon twist and an olive. He insisted on mixing his concoction for Stalin at the Teheran conference. Stalin found it “cold on the stomach” but tasty.

8. Julia Child preferred reverse martinis: a glass full of vermouth on the rocks (she liked Noilly Prat) with a topper of gin. She said she could easily down two of those.

9. Queen Elizabeth II likes Gordon’s gin with three slices of lemon. She may have gotten her taste for gin from her mom – the Queen Mother once requested that two bottles of Dubonnet and gin be packed for an outing, “in case it is needed.” The note she wrote to an aide requesting the booze sold at an auction for $32,000 in July.

10. W.C. Fields reportedly liked to start his day with a couple of double martinis in the morning – one before breakfast and one after.

Richard Nixon liked his martinis, but several sources say he couldn’t handle them very well. He liked the ratio to be about seven parts gin to one part vermouth.