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ON THIS DAY – October 27, 1915

 

At the Morgue on Saturday, Dr. Cole, P M , city coroner, investigated the shooting tragedy at a house in Nelson street, Abbotsford, on October 27. After a quarrel, William Green, aged 32 years shot Eileen Veronica McCormack, aged 25 years, his housekeeper, who died instantly. Green then committed suicide. Mary Green, of Docker street, Richmond, said that William Green was her son. On the day of the shooting Green asked his housekeeper to come inside, as he wanted to speak to her. McCormack refused. Green took her by the arm and pulled her inside. He then caught her by the throat, and it seemed as if he was strangling her. Mrs. Green tried to pull him away and struck him over the face. Green caught hold of McCormack’s legs and threw her on the ground. Mrs. Green at once left to obtain help. During her absence shots were fired. The bedroom was full of smoke, and Green and McCormack were found dead on the floor. McCormack’s infant was sitting beside its mother, playing with the revolver.  It was stated that Green was a married man, living apart from his wife, and McCormack a married woman, living apart from her husband. Dr. Cole found that the deceased died from gun shot wounds. He was of the opinion that the shots were fired by Green but there was not sufficient evidence to show his state of mind at the time.

 

 

MURDERED ON THIS DAY ……….. 14th October 1915

Maria Black aged 29 was charged at the City Court with having murdered Mabel Weston aged 45 at West Melbourne on the 14th of October 1915. It was alleged that Black went to a house in Capel-street, West Melbourne, occupied by Mrs. Mabel Weston, and her family. Black entered the house at the back, when Mrs. Weston, her family and a Spanish lodger named Valdo Pinsack were at dinner. Black opened the kitchen door, and fired at Mrs. Weston, who fell from her chair to the floor. Pinsack seized Black’s hand and while he held her she fired again. When she was arrested Black said she had known the Weston for three years. They had lived next door to one another. Pinsack became infatuated with her, and although she did not return his affection she pretended she was in love with him. Mrs. Weston, however, came between them, and did all she could to keep them apart. She (Black) had received letters in a filthy condition, which she said had been sent at the instigation of Mrs. Weston. Black added that she found in a drawer at her home a revolver that had belonged to a man who had gone to the front. She took the revolver to Weston’s house, so as to frighten her. After entering the Weston’s kitchen her mind was a blank ‘until she was conscious of Pinsack taking the revolver from her.

 

 

On This Day – September 9, 1916

At the City Police Court to-day Alexander McIvor was charged with having shot at Constable Frederick C Furnell at Gardenvale, on September 9, with intent to commit murder.

Sub-lnspector O’Brien said that on September 9 Constable Furnell was making some inquiries in Gardenvale. He saw a man on the verandah of a house, whose movements seemed suspicious. Furnell spoke to him, and on searching him found a chisel. Furnell them led the man away, when suddenly he fired six shots at the constable from a revolver. Each shot hit Furnell, but none caused serious injury. Furnell swooned, and the man escaped.

The accused, who denied the charge, was remanded till Monday. Bail was refused.

On This Day – August 29, 1880

An attempted double murder and suicide occurred at Echuca East on August 29 amongst the residents of the Chinese quarter, which created some sensation. The cause of the affair was a woman. A Chinaman named Georgo Cooey Foo, a well-known dangerous character, who has already served a sentence in Delinquin gaol for stabbing a man, fired at a woman named Sarah Newell and a countryman named William Ah Loon. Cooey Foo has been employed as cook on board the Lady of the Lake steamer. Ah Loon filled a like position on the South Australian steamer Cadell, and when recently at Echuca he was robbed of a £5-note by another Chinaman named James Ah Poo. Ah Loon came to Echuca to be present at the trial of Ah Poo, who, however, had absconded from his bail. Ah Loon then, in the absence of Cooey Foo, took up with the woman Newell. This enraged Cooey Foo, who purchased a revolver — six chambered pin-tire— and he went to Echuca East on August 29, and saw the woman Newell in bed. He fired two shots at her, neither of which took effect. Ah Loon then came to the rescue, and was fired at, but missed. He rushed Cooey Foo, and was shot in the head. The bullet glanced off the cheek-bone and emerged at the neck. Dr. Croker was called in, but unless erysipelas sets in danger is not apprehended. Senior-constable Nedwell arrested Cooey Foo on the capital charge of shooting with intent to murder. Cooey Foo admitted the shooting, and said he was sorry he had been baulked in his design of shooting both. He swallowed a piece of opium, but an emetic caused him to vomit, and he is now out of danger. Cooey Foo had written a letter to a countryman, in Chinese characters, saying he would be dead when the letter reached his friend, and telling the latter to get his watch, clothes, and money.

On This Day – May 9th, 1889

On May 9th, 1889, a man named Walter Brooks, an insurance agent, attempted to murder a woman with whom he had been living, named Matilda Thompson, at Earl-street, North Carlton.  Brooks was charged with wilful trespass at the house of Mrs Thompson’s son the week before. He went to gaol, and was liberated on the 8th of May.

On the morning of the 9th of May, he again went to the house of Mrs Thompson’s son, in Earl street, and knocked at the door.  He was refused admittance, and immediately placed a small six chambered revolver at the keyhole and fired two shots. A young woman, named Emily Spooner who was in the house with Mrs Thompson, and on hearing the shot she rushed out the back door. Brooks met her at the door as she was going out, and rushed into the house. Mrs Thompson was in the front room, and Brooks went to where she was and caught her by the neck and threw her across his knees and threatened to blow her brains out, at the same time placing the revolver at her head. At this moment Mrs Liddy, who is the landlady of the house, and Constables Reidy and Lowry, who had been attracted by the sound of the gunshot, arrived on the scene, and Brooks, who was struggling with Mrs Thompson, released her and let her go to answer the door. As soon as the door was opened Mrs Thompson rushed out. Brooks followed her to the door, and on seeing the constables drew back and closed the door.

Almost immediately, another shot was heard, and on the police entering the property, they found the man lying on a bed in the bedroom, with the revolver clutched in his hand, whilst the blood was flowing profusely from his mouth and nose.

In the deceased’s hand was found a portrait of Mrs Thompson, and also a letter in which he stated that he and Mrs Thompson had been living together as man and wife for some time. All was alright until about three weeks ago when she had neglected his children, which were by his late wife, and had then left him. He stated that he loved her better than his soul and intended to murder her and then commit suicide, and prayed that God would assist him to complete it.

On This Day – January 12, 1892

Ernest Knox was executed for the murder of Isaac Crawcour at Williamstown on January 12. The particulars of the murder are as follow : Mr. Michael Crawcour, pawnbroker, of Williamstown, was awakened about 3am on the day in question, by the ringing of the electric bell alarm in his shop. Seizing a loaded revolver, Mr. Crawcour hastened down stairs, and, when he reached the ground floor he found men in the shop. Standing beside the back window, which the burglars had opened, he called on the men to come out. His reply was a bullet which just touched his right ear. Presently a second shot was fired and a bullet whizzed through his whiskers. He tried to return the fire, but his revolver would not act, and he then waited to grapple with the men as they endeavoured to escape. Meanwhile Mrs. Crawcour called her son Isaac, a young man of about 19 years. Immediately, without the slightest hesitation, he rushed to the assistance of his father, and seeing a man trying to escape by the front door, he quickly seized him. During the ensuing struggle the burglar placed the muzzle of a revolver close to his stomach and fired. The ball passed through young Crawcour’s body, and, though in much pain, he kept up the struggle and wrenched the revolver from his opponent. Mr. Crawcour missed the second man, who escaped, and by the time his son had seized the revolver came to his help. He took charge of the man on the ground, who begged to be dealt with gently. He said, “Don’t hurt me, don’t hurt me,” and when asked why he had shot the son, answered, that he had not done so intentionally. The revolver had exploded during a scuffle, he explained, and he was sorry if it had done any harm. The police arrived within a few minutes, and the burglar was taken into custody. Young Crawcour, who was sustained by excitement and nerve during the conflict, became exhausted through loss of blood, and when examined was found to be in a critical condition. The bullet had entered the body at the seventh rib and had issued on the other side at the twelfth. For about 36 hours the wounded youth lingered, when death ensued from shock to the system and exhaustion. Isaac Crawcour’s murderer proved to be a young man of about 19 or 20 years of age, named Ernest Jamieson, alias Knox, a resident of Little Cardigan-street, Carlton. From the description furnished of his companion the detectives arrested John Charles Jent, aged 18. Jent made a full confession, and at the coroner’s inquest on the body of Isaac Crawcour a verdict of wilful murder against both prisoners was returned. The trial took place at the Criminal Court, Williamstown, on February 15, when the jury found Knox guilty of burglary and wounding; and Jent guilty of burglary only. They also found that Knox fired the shot with the intention of wounding young Crawcour. Prisoners were sentenced, Jent to three years’ hard labor, and Knox to death.

 

On This Day – January 4, 1916

At the Morgue the State Coroner conducted an inquiry into the circumstances, surrounding the death of Vera May Spark, 23 years, single, who was shot dead on this day in January by Raymond Victor Dawson, 25, in the Matter’s house, at 178 George-Street, Fitzroy. Dawson, who was present in custody. According to the story told by Dawson to the police shortly after the occurrence, he went into the kitchen, where Spark was preparing breakfast, he had a revolver in one hand and an alarm clock in the other. Pointing the revolver at her he said jocularly, ‘I will shoot you.’ She replied ‘Go on why, you could not shoot a maggot.’ Dawson repeated that he would shoot her. Spark opened her mouth and said, ‘Shoot that’ Dawson pulled the trigger. There was an immediate explosion. The woman fell back on the sofa, with blood pouring from her mouth. She died in a few minutes. Dawson went to Fitzroy police station and explained the circumstances of the occurrence, saying be did not know the revolver was loaded. The revolver from which the shot was fired has disappeared, and no trace of it can be found.

ON THIS DAY – October 27, 1915

 

At the Morgue on Saturday, Dr. Cole, P M , city coroner, investigated the shooting tragedy at a house in Nelson street, Abbotsford, on October 27. After a quarrel, William Green, aged 32 years shot Eileen Veronica McCormack, aged 25 years, his housekeeper, who died instantly. Green then committed suicide. Mary Green, of Docker street, Richmond, said that William Green was her son. On the day of the shooting Green asked his housekeeper to come inside, as he wanted to speak to her. McCormack refused. Green took her by the arm and pulled her inside. He then caught her by the throat, and it seemed as if he was strangling her. Mrs. Green tried to pull him away and struck him over the face. Green caught hold of McCormack’s legs and threw her on the ground. Mrs. Green at once left to obtain help. During her absence shots were fired. The bedroom was full of smoke, and Green and McCormack were found dead on the floor. McCormack’s infant was sitting beside its mother, playing with the revolver.  It was stated that Green was a married man, living apart from his wife, and McCormack a married woman, living apart from her husband. Dr. Cole found that the deceased died from gun shot wounds. He was of the opinion that the shots were fired by Green but there was not sufficient evidence to show his state of mind at the time.

 

 

MURDERED ON THIS DAY ……….. 14th October 1915

Maria Black aged 29 was charged at the City Court with having murdered Mabel Weston aged 45 at West Melbourne on the 14th of October 1915. It was alleged that Black went to a house in Capel-street, West Melbourne, occupied by Mrs. Mabel Weston, and her family. Black entered the house at the back, when Mrs. Weston, her family and a Spanish lodger named Valdo Pinsack were at dinner. Black opened the kitchen door, and fired at Mrs. Weston, who fell from her chair to the floor. Pinsack seized Black’s hand and while he held her she fired again. When she was arrested Black said she had known the Weston for three years. They had lived next door to one another. Pinsack became infatuated with her, and although she did not return his affection she pretended she was in love with him. Mrs. Weston, however, came between them, and did all she could to keep them apart. She (Black) had received letters in a filthy condition, which she said had been sent at the instigation of Mrs. Weston. Black added that she found in a drawer at her home a revolver that had belonged to a man who had gone to the front. She took the revolver to Weston’s house, so as to frighten her. After entering the Weston’s kitchen her mind was a blank ‘until she was conscious of Pinsack taking the revolver from her.

 

 

On This Day – September 9, 1916

At the City Police Court to-day Alexander McIvor was charged with having shot at Constable Frederick C Furnell at Gardenvale, on September 9, with intent to commit murder.

Sub-lnspector O’Brien said that on September 9 Constable Furnell was making some inquiries in Gardenvale. He saw a man on the verandah of a house, whose movements seemed suspicious. Furnell spoke to him, and on searching him found a chisel. Furnell them led the man away, when suddenly he fired six shots at the constable from a revolver. Each shot hit Furnell, but none caused serious injury. Furnell swooned, and the man escaped.

The accused, who denied the charge, was remanded till Monday. Bail was refused.

On This Day – August 29, 1880

An attempted double murder and suicide occurred at Echuca East on August 29 amongst the residents of the Chinese quarter, which created some sensation. The cause of the affair was a woman. A Chinaman named Georgo Cooey Foo, a well-known dangerous character, who has already served a sentence in Delinquin gaol for stabbing a man, fired at a woman named Sarah Newell and a countryman named William Ah Loon. Cooey Foo has been employed as cook on board the Lady of the Lake steamer. Ah Loon filled a like position on the South Australian steamer Cadell, and when recently at Echuca he was robbed of a £5-note by another Chinaman named James Ah Poo. Ah Loon came to Echuca to be present at the trial of Ah Poo, who, however, had absconded from his bail. Ah Loon then, in the absence of Cooey Foo, took up with the woman Newell. This enraged Cooey Foo, who purchased a revolver — six chambered pin-tire— and he went to Echuca East on August 29, and saw the woman Newell in bed. He fired two shots at her, neither of which took effect. Ah Loon then came to the rescue, and was fired at, but missed. He rushed Cooey Foo, and was shot in the head. The bullet glanced off the cheek-bone and emerged at the neck. Dr. Croker was called in, but unless erysipelas sets in danger is not apprehended. Senior-constable Nedwell arrested Cooey Foo on the capital charge of shooting with intent to murder. Cooey Foo admitted the shooting, and said he was sorry he had been baulked in his design of shooting both. He swallowed a piece of opium, but an emetic caused him to vomit, and he is now out of danger. Cooey Foo had written a letter to a countryman, in Chinese characters, saying he would be dead when the letter reached his friend, and telling the latter to get his watch, clothes, and money.

On This Day – May 9th, 1889

On May 9th, 1889, a man named Walter Brooks, an insurance agent, attempted to murder a woman with whom he had been living, named Matilda Thompson, at Earl-street, North Carlton.  Brooks was charged with wilful trespass at the house of Mrs Thompson’s son the week before. He went to gaol, and was liberated on the 8th of May.

On the morning of the 9th of May, he again went to the house of Mrs Thompson’s son, in Earl street, and knocked at the door.  He was refused admittance, and immediately placed a small six chambered revolver at the keyhole and fired two shots. A young woman, named Emily Spooner who was in the house with Mrs Thompson, and on hearing the shot she rushed out the back door. Brooks met her at the door as she was going out, and rushed into the house. Mrs Thompson was in the front room, and Brooks went to where she was and caught her by the neck and threw her across his knees and threatened to blow her brains out, at the same time placing the revolver at her head. At this moment Mrs Liddy, who is the landlady of the house, and Constables Reidy and Lowry, who had been attracted by the sound of the gunshot, arrived on the scene, and Brooks, who was struggling with Mrs Thompson, released her and let her go to answer the door. As soon as the door was opened Mrs Thompson rushed out. Brooks followed her to the door, and on seeing the constables drew back and closed the door.

Almost immediately, another shot was heard, and on the police entering the property, they found the man lying on a bed in the bedroom, with the revolver clutched in his hand, whilst the blood was flowing profusely from his mouth and nose.

In the deceased’s hand was found a portrait of Mrs Thompson, and also a letter in which he stated that he and Mrs Thompson had been living together as man and wife for some time. All was alright until about three weeks ago when she had neglected his children, which were by his late wife, and had then left him. He stated that he loved her better than his soul and intended to murder her and then commit suicide, and prayed that God would assist him to complete it.