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ON THIS DAY – July 31, 1922

In the Malvern Police Court Robert Albert Scott, a French polisher, was charged with having, at Malvern, on July 31 shot Marie Dorothy Victoria Frith, a widow, aged 32 years, with intent to murder her.

Marié Dorothy Victoria Frith said that she had known Scott for about 14 months. They had been on friendly terms. On the evening of July 31 she met him by appointment at the Malvern Town Hall, and they walked along High-street until they came to a seat near the reserve at the corner of Edgar-street, where they sat down. In reply to a request by Scott that he should be allowed to continue to meet her witness said : “No, we have talked the matter over before and I am still of the same mind. I do not wish to talk about it any more.” Scott was silent for a few minutes. He then said: “Well if I can’t have you no one will. This ends it.” He drew a revolver and fired at her. The shot missed. Witness ran to the middle of the road. He then pointed the revolver at her face and fired four shots. She put up her left arm to shield her face. She thought that two shots entered her arm. She cried out: “What are you shooting me for? Stop shooting me.”

Witness noticed about half a dozen people standing on the footpath. A carrier’s van passed. The carrier looked out at the side and slowed down, but he passed on. Nobody came to her assistance. Scott said: “What are you making all this fuss about, you silly woman?” He then drew the revolver again and fired about four more shots. . He hit witness three times. One shot was in the left arm, which she had again put up to protect her face. She said to Scott: “You said that you would not shoot again” He said: “I intend to finish you.” Witness tried to run to the road again, but he grabbed her by the hair and threw her to the ground. Scott fired again, the bullet striking witness in the neck. Witness struggled with her arms over her face and another shot struck her in the elbow. She was trying to scream, but could not, as blood was flowing from her mouth freely. Scott took her further down the paddock and sat her down against a fence in a lane, saying: “Now don’t you move.” He then went to look for witness’s hat and glasses, and returned with the hat. Witness felt very weak and was in great pain. She was bleeding freely from the neck and arm. Scott next took her by the arm, and she said “Now let me get home. Will you stop following me any more? Will you stop shooting me?” They walked towards her home and be held her by the arm. She was holding his other hand so that he could not use the revolver. They walked up Tooronga-road to Wattle Tree-road, where witness resides. He said to her: “Will you promise me not to inform the police or tell anyone?” She said: “No, I will not tell the police.” Witness was terrified. He said “Will you meet me on Wednesday night?” Witness said “Yes,” not meaning, however, to keep her promise. He kissed her goodnight and said again. “Will you meet me on Wednesday night?” .She answered “Yes” and then said suddenly “There is your tram,” and left him. Witness complained to Mr and Mrs. M’Call, where she was boarding. Subsequently she was taken to the hospital. Scott was committed for trial.

ON THIS DAY – DECEMBER 14, 1909

SPRING GULLY

The inquiry into the death of Dagmar Louisa Scott, who was found dead at Spring Gully on December 14, was resumed at Castlemaine by the coroner (Mr. S. J. Goldsmith) on Monday. The husband, Robert Scott, was present in custody on a charge of murder. The principal witness was Thomas Kaiser, brother of Mrs. Scott, Who deposed to being at Scott’s house on June 22, when a quarrel arose over Scott having gone secretly to Melbourne. He heard Mrs. Scott say, “You have been to Melbourne to see that other woman of yours, Mrs. Saunders.” Scott replied, “Whether I have been to Melbourne to see that other woman or not, if I hear any more of it I will blow your brains out, and Saunders’s, too.” Mrs. Scott then rushed out of the house, but came back later on, and she and Scott had a quarrel outside, and she fainted. Scott carried her into the house, and she soon revived, and the quarrelling recommenced. Witness was going away, but deceased implored him not to, saying, “As sure as you go he will murder me.” Scott said, “It is all right, Tom, you can go; I will not harm her. On the day of the tragedy he went to Scott’s house and saw the body. Scott said, “This is a fine thing, isn’t” it?” Witness replied, “Yes. You are at the bottom of the lot. You have well murdered her. You threatened her before in front of me. and you have done it now.” Scott made no reply. Charles Saunders, a miner employed under Scott at the Spring Gully dredge, gave evidence that immoral relations had existed between Scott and his (witness’s) wife, in consequence of which Mrs. Saunders left home early last March, and had been in Melbourne ever since. Witness had been on friendly, terms with Scott, and continued to work under him. Alice James, housekeeper for Saunders, gave evidence as to seeing: Scott and his wife going towards the tailings heap, and hearing the shot fired. Mrs. Scott appeared unwilling to go. and just as they reached the high bank Scott gave his wife a push, and they both disappeared behind the high hank, and the shot went off. The coroner found that death was due to a shot fired by Robert Scott, who was committed for trial on a charge of murder.

 

ON THIS DAY – July 31, 1922

In the Malvern Police Court Robert Albert Scott, a French polisher, was charged with having, at Malvern, on July 31 shot Marie Dorothy Victoria Frith, a widow, aged 32 years, with intent to murder her.

Marié Dorothy Victoria Frith said that she had known Scott for about 14 months. They had been on friendly terms. On the evening of July 31 she met him by appointment at the Malvern Town Hall, and they walked along High-street until they came to a seat near the reserve at the corner of Edgar-street, where they sat down. In reply to a request by Scott that he should be allowed to continue to meet her witness said : “No, we have talked the matter over before and I am still of the same mind. I do not wish to talk about it any more.” Scott was silent for a few minutes. He then said: “Well if I can’t have you no one will. This ends it.” He drew a revolver and fired at her. The shot missed. Witness ran to the middle of the road. He then pointed the revolver at her face and fired four shots. She put up her left arm to shield her face. She thought that two shots entered her arm. She cried out: “What are you shooting me for? Stop shooting me.”

Witness noticed about half a dozen people standing on the footpath. A carrier’s van passed. The carrier looked out at the side and slowed down, but he passed on. Nobody came to her assistance. Scott said: “What are you making all this fuss about, you silly woman?” He then drew the revolver again and fired about four more shots. . He hit witness three times. One shot was in the left arm, which she had again put up to protect her face. She said to Scott: “You said that you would not shoot again” He said: “I intend to finish you.” Witness tried to run to the road again, but he grabbed her by the hair and threw her to the ground. Scott fired again, the bullet striking witness in the neck. Witness struggled with her arms over her face and another shot struck her in the elbow. She was trying to scream, but could not, as blood was flowing from her mouth freely. Scott took her further down the paddock and sat her down against a fence in a lane, saying: “Now don’t you move.” He then went to look for witness’s hat and glasses, and returned with the hat. Witness felt very weak and was in great pain. She was bleeding freely from the neck and arm. Scott next took her by the arm, and she said “Now let me get home. Will you stop following me any more? Will you stop shooting me?” They walked towards her home and be held her by the arm. She was holding his other hand so that he could not use the revolver. They walked up Tooronga-road to Wattle Tree-road, where witness resides. He said to her: “Will you promise me not to inform the police or tell anyone?” She said: “No, I will not tell the police.” Witness was terrified. He said “Will you meet me on Wednesday night?” Witness said “Yes,” not meaning, however, to keep her promise. He kissed her goodnight and said again. “Will you meet me on Wednesday night?” .She answered “Yes” and then said suddenly “There is your tram,” and left him. Witness complained to Mr and Mrs. M’Call, where she was boarding. Subsequently she was taken to the hospital. Scott was committed for trial.

ON THIS DAY – DECEMBER 14, 1909

SPRING GULLY

The inquiry into the death of Dagmar Louisa Scott, who was found dead at Spring Gully on December 14, was resumed at Castlemaine by the coroner (Mr. S. J. Goldsmith) on Monday. The husband, Robert Scott, was present in custody on a charge of murder. The principal witness was Thomas Kaiser, brother of Mrs. Scott, Who deposed to being at Scott’s house on June 22, when a quarrel arose over Scott having gone secretly to Melbourne. He heard Mrs. Scott say, “You have been to Melbourne to see that other woman of yours, Mrs. Saunders.” Scott replied, “Whether I have been to Melbourne to see that other woman or not, if I hear any more of it I will blow your brains out, and Saunders’s, too.” Mrs. Scott then rushed out of the house, but came back later on, and she and Scott had a quarrel outside, and she fainted. Scott carried her into the house, and she soon revived, and the quarrelling recommenced. Witness was going away, but deceased implored him not to, saying, “As sure as you go he will murder me.” Scott said, “It is all right, Tom, you can go; I will not harm her. On the day of the tragedy he went to Scott’s house and saw the body. Scott said, “This is a fine thing, isn’t” it?” Witness replied, “Yes. You are at the bottom of the lot. You have well murdered her. You threatened her before in front of me. and you have done it now.” Scott made no reply. Charles Saunders, a miner employed under Scott at the Spring Gully dredge, gave evidence that immoral relations had existed between Scott and his (witness’s) wife, in consequence of which Mrs. Saunders left home early last March, and had been in Melbourne ever since. Witness had been on friendly, terms with Scott, and continued to work under him. Alice James, housekeeper for Saunders, gave evidence as to seeing: Scott and his wife going towards the tailings heap, and hearing the shot fired. Mrs. Scott appeared unwilling to go. and just as they reached the high bank Scott gave his wife a push, and they both disappeared behind the high hank, and the shot went off. The coroner found that death was due to a shot fired by Robert Scott, who was committed for trial on a charge of murder.

 

ON THIS DAY – July 31, 1922

In the Malvern Police Court Robert Albert Scott, a French polisher, was charged with having, at Malvern, on July 31 shot Marie Dorothy Victoria Frith, a widow, aged 32 years, with intent to murder her.

Marié Dorothy Victoria Frith said that she had known Scott for about 14 months. They had been on friendly terms. On the evening of July 31 she met him by appointment at the Malvern Town Hall, and they walked along High-street until they came to a seat near the reserve at the corner of Edgar-street, where they sat down. In reply to a request by Scott that he should be allowed to continue to meet her witness said : “No, we have talked the matter over before and I am still of the same mind. I do not wish to talk about it any more.” Scott was silent for a few minutes. He then said: “Well if I can’t have you no one will. This ends it.” He drew a revolver and fired at her. The shot missed. Witness ran to the middle of the road. He then pointed the revolver at her face and fired four shots. She put up her left arm to shield her face. She thought that two shots entered her arm. She cried out: “What are you shooting me for? Stop shooting me.”

Witness noticed about half a dozen people standing on the footpath. A carrier’s van passed. The carrier looked out at the side and slowed down, but he passed on. Nobody came to her assistance. Scott said: “What are you making all this fuss about, you silly woman?” He then drew the revolver again and fired about four more shots. . He hit witness three times. One shot was in the left arm, which she had again put up to protect her face. She said to Scott: “You said that you would not shoot again” He said: “I intend to finish you.” Witness tried to run to the road again, but he grabbed her by the hair and threw her to the ground. Scott fired again, the bullet striking witness in the neck. Witness struggled with her arms over her face and another shot struck her in the elbow. She was trying to scream, but could not, as blood was flowing from her mouth freely. Scott took her further down the paddock and sat her down against a fence in a lane, saying: “Now don’t you move.” He then went to look for witness’s hat and glasses, and returned with the hat. Witness felt very weak and was in great pain. She was bleeding freely from the neck and arm. Scott next took her by the arm, and she said “Now let me get home. Will you stop following me any more? Will you stop shooting me?” They walked towards her home and be held her by the arm. She was holding his other hand so that he could not use the revolver. They walked up Tooronga-road to Wattle Tree-road, where witness resides. He said to her: “Will you promise me not to inform the police or tell anyone?” She said: “No, I will not tell the police.” Witness was terrified. He said “Will you meet me on Wednesday night?” Witness said “Yes,” not meaning, however, to keep her promise. He kissed her goodnight and said again. “Will you meet me on Wednesday night?” .She answered “Yes” and then said suddenly “There is your tram,” and left him. Witness complained to Mr and Mrs. M’Call, where she was boarding. Subsequently she was taken to the hospital. Scott was committed for trial.

ON THIS DAY – DECEMBER 14, 1909

SPRING GULLY

12358114_222352014762601_572350276_nThe inquiry into the death of Dagmar Louisa Scott, who was found dead at Spring Gully on December 14, was resumed at Castlemaine by the coroner (Mr. S. J. Goldsmith) on Monday. The husband, Robert Scott, was present in custody on a charge of murder. The principal witness was Thomas Kaiser, brother of Mrs. Scott, Who deposed to being at Scott’s house on June 22, when a quarrel arose over Scott having gone secretly to Melbourne. He heard Mrs. Scott say, “You have been to Melbourne to see that other woman of yours, Mrs. Saunders.” Scott replied, “Whether I have been to Melbourne to see that other woman or not, if I hear any more of it I will blow your brains out, and Saunders’s, too.” Mrs. Scott then rushed out of the house, but came back later on, and she and Scott had a quarrel outside, and she fainted. Scott carried her into the house, and she soon revived, and the quarrelling recommenced. Witness was going away, but deceased implored him not to, saying, “As sure as you go he will murder me.” Scott said, “It is all right, Tom, you can go; I will not harm her. On the day of the tragedy he went to Scott’s house and saw the body. Scott said, “This is a fine thing, isn’t” it?” Witness replied, “Yes. You are at the bottom of the lot. You have well murdered her. You threatened her before in front of me. and you have done it now.” Scott made no reply. Charles Saunders, a miner employed under Scott at the Spring Gully dredge, gave evidence that immoral relations had existed between Scott and his (witness’s) wife, in consequence of which Mrs. Saunders left home early last March, and had been in Melbourne ever since. Witness had been on friendly, terms with Scott, and continued to work under him. Alice James, housekeeper for Saunders, gave evidence as to seeing: Scott and his wife going towards the tailings heap, and hearing the shot fired. Mrs. Scott appeared unwilling to go. and just as they reached the high bank Scott gave his wife a push, and they both disappeared behind the high hank, and the shot went off. The coroner found that death was due to a shot fired by Robert Scott, who was committed for trial on a charge of murder.