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Bluey was an Australia police drama series made by Crawford Production in Melbourne for the Seven Network. Which ran from the 2nd of August 1976 to the 25th of April 1977.

Stand-up comedian Lucky Grills was cast as the titular Det. Sergeant “Bluey” Hills.

Hills character was different to other detectives seen in Crawford’s previous shows. Being obese, heavily drinking, smoking, visited prostitutes, Hills character took on a life of its own.

Bluey was set at Melbourne’s Russell Street Police Headquarters, and many scenes were shot around South Melbourne.

“Bluey” Hills heading his own squad (“Department B”), due to his inability to work within the existing police squads.

Department B was given cases which the other departments could not solve by conventional means.  Hills applying his unconventional methods to bring about their resolution.

Bluey was supported in his investigations by newly assigned Det. Gary Dawson (John Diedrich) long-time cohort Sgt. Monica Rourke (Gerda Nicolson), and undercover officer Det. Sgt. Reg Truscott (Terry Gill), who spent his time ostensibly working as a small-time burglar, and supplying Bluey with information on the activities of local criminals. 

Unlike other Australian TV series at the time the entirely show shot on colour film.

The final episode “Son Of Bluey” featured an appearance by actor Don Barker as Det. Sgt. Harry White – the same character he played in Homicide television series.

Bluey found a new audience two decades later when the dubbed clips from the show formed the basis for the popular The Late Show comedy sketch “Bargearse”.

In addition to two guest appearances as himself, Grills also reprised his role as Bluey on The Late Show in order to protest the airing of the last Bargearse sketch.

Another enduring element from the show, the theme music, is now best associated with coverage of cricket from Nine Network’s Wide World of Sports.

visit www.twistedhistory.net.au

On this day ………… 9th February 1894

The police authorities at Russell street station report that a respectably-dressed man entered the office on February 9 and asked to be taken in charge, on the ground that he had forgotten his name and wanted to find out who he was. Medical evidence showed that the man was perfectly sane, but was suffering from a sudden and peculiar loss of memory. The following day he was brought up at the police court and remanded to the gaol hospital for a week. At the police court on February 17 the police reported that the man was not able to appear yet. It seems that he has been again examined, and that a well-known practitioner says he is suffering from epileptic automatism, under which people can dress themselves and perform ordinary duties, all the time being mentally in a trance.

 

 

On this day ………… 9th February 1894

The police authorities at Russell street station report that a respectably-dressed man entered the office on February 9 and asked to be taken in charge, on the ground that he had forgotten his name and wanted to find out who he was. Medical evidence showed that the man was perfectly sane, but was suffering from a sudden and peculiar loss of memory. The following day he was brought up at the police court and remanded to the gaol hospital for a week. At the police court on February 17 the police reported that the man was not able to appear yet. It seems that he has been again examined, and that a well-known practitioner says he is suffering from epileptic automatism, under which people can dress themselves and perform ordinary duties, all the time being mentally in a trance.