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On this day …….. 31st of October 1874

A brutality displayed of cannibalism actuated by jealous rage was displayed by George Eskdale, a professional direr, lived in Nott-street Sandridge, Victoria on this day in 1874. Eskdale on discovering an opposite neighbour James Frederick Melton, a cork-cutter visiting his wife at her own house. The visit is said to have been a thoroughly, harmless one, the parties being old acquaintances from having at one time lived next door to each other, and Melton had merely gone there to tell the woman about fetching soma money due to her when the husband entered, and, crying out that he had long suspected the pair of improper intimacy, and would now have his revenge, blacked Melton’s eyes, knocked him down, and, seizing his nose between his teeth, chewed it as a dog would gnaw a bone. When at length Melton was thrown out of the house on to the sand, Eskdale repented the outrage, and has succeeded in reducing his victim’s nasal organ to a hideous pulp.

 

On this day …….. 12th September 1854

With the discovery of gold in Victoria in 1851 Melbourne became the richest city in the world. With this Victoria became the first Australian state to have a completed railway line. Although South Australia had begun operations of horse-drawn trains on 18 May 1854 between Goolwa and Port Elliot, mechanical railways were first established in Victoria in 1854, with work on the line commencing in March 1853. At first, trains were ordered from Robert Stephenson and Company of the United Kingdom, but shipping delays meant that the first trains had to be built locally. Robertson, Martin and Smith built Australia’s first steam locomotive in ten weeks at a cost of £2700. The first steam train in Australia, consisting of two first-class carriages and one second-class carriage, made its maiden voyage on 12 September 1854. It ran along the four kilometre track from Flinders Street to Sandridge, now Port Melbourne, a ten-minute journey. Aboard the first train were Lieutenant-Governor Sir Charles Hotham and Lady Hotham. Upon arriving at its destination at Station Pier, the train was met with gun-salutes by the warships HMS Electra and HMS Fantome. The following year, the locomotives ordered from the UK arrived, and were named Melbourne, Sandridge, Victoria and Yarra.

 

On this day …….. 26th September 1855

Up until the mid-1800s, the horse and carriage remained the major means of transporting goods and people long distances overland. Victoria was the first colony to build a railway line, which ran from Melbourne’s Flinders Street Station and Port Melbourne, then called Sandridge. The line was opened on 12 September 1854. In 1849, the Sydney Railway Company started building the first railway track in New South Wales. It ran between Sydney and Parramatta, for a distance of 22 km. The construction suffered some setbacks, in particular financial difficulty, and was put on hold until taken over by the New South Wales colonial government. The line finally opened on 26 September 1855.

 

On this day …….. 18th May 1854

Victoria is generally accepted as the first place in Australia to have had a completed railway line. The first steam train in Australia made its maiden voyage on the 12th of September 1854, running between Flinders Street and Sandridge, now Port Melbourne. However, the first railway ever to run in Australia was actually in South Australia. South Australia was one of only two Australian states to have been founded by free settlers (the other being Western Australia), and the only state that remained entirely free of convicts during its early history. Its capital city, Adelaide, was designed by Colonel William Light, who arrived in South Australia in 1836. The southern colony quickly grew, fed by immigrants and free settlers in search of a better life or escaping religious persecution. South Australia was known for a number of “firsts”. It was the site where Australia’s first paddlesteamer was launched. It was the site from which both the first east to west crossing and successful south to north crossing of the continent was undertaken. It was also the first colony to implement a railway. South Australia began operations of horse-drawn trains on the 18th of May 1854. The line ran from Goolwa, on the Murray River, to the harbour at Port Elliot, and was used to move supplies between craft navigating the Murray River, and coastal and ocean-going vessels. After numerous vessels were shipwrecked at the entrance to the bay, the terminus was moved from Port Elliot and the line extended to Victor Harbor, in 1864.

On This Day ……. 22nd April 1870

William Henry Ailsop, convicted of robbery with violence on an old man at Sandridge, was sent to Geelong Gaol for five years with hard labour.

 

On this day …….. 31st of October 1874

A brutality displayed of cannibalism actuated by jealous rage was displayed by George Eskdale, a professional direr, lived in Nott-street Sandridge, Victoria on this day in 1874. Eskdale on discovering an opposite neighbour James Frederick Melton, a cork-cutter visiting his wife at her own house. The visit is said to have been a thoroughly, harmless one, the parties being old acquaintances from having at one time lived next door to each other, and Melton had merely gone there to tell the woman about fetching soma money due to her when the husband entered, and, crying out that he had long suspected the pair of improper intimacy, and would now have his revenge, blacked Melton’s eyes, knocked him down, and, seizing his nose between his teeth, chewed it as a dog would gnaw a bone. When at length Melton was thrown out of the house on to the sand, Eskdale repented the outrage, and has succeeded in reducing his victim’s nasal organ to a hideous pulp.

 

On this day …….. 26th September 1855

Up until the mid-1800s, the horse and carriage remained the major means of transporting goods and people long distances overland. Victoria was the first colony to build a railway line, which ran from Melbourne’s Flinders Street Station and Port Melbourne, then called Sandridge. The line was opened on 12 September 1854. In 1849, the Sydney Railway Company started building the first railway track in New South Wales. It ran between Sydney and Parramatta, for a distance of 22 km. The construction suffered some setbacks, in particular financial difficulty, and was put on hold until taken over by the New South Wales colonial government. The line finally opened on 26 September 1855.

 

On this day …….. 12th September 1854

With the discovery of gold in Victoria in 1851 Melbourne became the richest city in the world. With this Victoria became the first Australian state to have a completed railway line. Although South Australia had begun operations of horse-drawn trains on 18 May 1854 between Goolwa and Port Elliot, mechanical railways were first established in Victoria in 1854, with work on the line commencing in March 1853. At first, trains were ordered from Robert Stephenson and Company of the United Kingdom, but shipping delays meant that the first trains had to be built locally. Robertson, Martin and Smith built Australia’s first steam locomotive in ten weeks at a cost of £2700. The first steam train in Australia, consisting of two first-class carriages and one second-class carriage, made its maiden voyage on 12 September 1854. It ran along the four kilometre track from Flinders Street to Sandridge, now Port Melbourne, a ten-minute journey. Aboard the first train were Lieutenant-Governor Sir Charles Hotham and Lady Hotham. Upon arriving at its destination at Station Pier, the train was met with gun-salutes by the warships HMS Electra and HMS Fantome. The following year, the locomotives ordered from the UK arrived, and were named Melbourne, Sandridge, Victoria and Yarra.

 

On this day …….. 18th May 1854

Victoria is generally accepted as the first place in Australia to have had a completed railway line. The first steam train in Australia made its maiden voyage on the 12th of September 1854, running between Flinders Street and Sandridge, now Port Melbourne. However, the first railway ever to run in Australia was actually in South Australia. South Australia was one of only two Australian states to have been founded by free settlers (the other being Western Australia), and the only state that remained entirely free of convicts during its early history. Its capital city, Adelaide, was designed by Colonel William Light, who arrived in South Australia in 1836. The southern colony quickly grew, fed by immigrants and free settlers in search of a better life or escaping religious persecution. South Australia was known for a number of “firsts”. It was the site where Australia’s first paddlesteamer was launched. It was the site from which both the first east to west crossing and successful south to north crossing of the continent was undertaken. It was also the first colony to implement a railway. South Australia began operations of horse-drawn trains on the 18th of May 1854. The line ran from Goolwa, on the Murray River, to the harbour at Port Elliot, and was used to move supplies between craft navigating the Murray River, and coastal and ocean-going vessels. After numerous vessels were shipwrecked at the entrance to the bay, the terminus was moved from Port Elliot and the line extended to Victor Harbor, in 1864.

On This Day ……. 22nd April 1870

William Henry Ailsop, convicted of robbery with violence on an old man at Sandridge, was sent to Geelong Gaol for five years with hard labour.