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Frank Gardiner, born in 1830 Scotland and shipped out to Australia as a child with his parents, made an illustrious career out of horse thievery and highway robbery. On 15 June 1862, Gardiner along with Ben Hall, John Gilbert and associates held up a gold escort travelling from Forbes to Bathurst. They stole over £14,000 worth of gold and bank notes – Australia’s biggest gold robbery. In February 1864, New South Wales police traced Gardiner to his hideout in Queensland. He was arrested and sentenced to 32 years of hard labour in July. Ten years later, Governor Hercules Robinson granted him mercy and released him, subject to exile. Gardiner lived in Hong Kong and Francisco before dying in Colorado in 1903. “Colonial rule was constantly challenged by bushrangers – it was a major threat to the central administration,” says Dr Hamish Maxwell-Stewart from the University of Tasmania. “They were turning the tables on the convict state.”

 

On this day …….. 25th of June 1875

In the obituary notices in The Argus newspaper, it appeared the death of a person
named Elizabeth Wickets, at the great age of 103 years. She was a native of Paisley, in Scotland, but at an early age went to Lancashire, where she was
employed as a cotton-weaver. At the time when steam power looms were introduced there was a great uprising of the ignorant weavers, who thought they would lose their employment, and Wickets, who was then a remarkably tall and strong young woman, joined in the disturbances and destroying of looms, and for this, with many others, was transported to Tasmania. In that colony she married a man named John Wickets, who was her second husband, and about the time of the gold fever, the pair came over to this colony of Victoria. The man was a gipsy, and earned a living as a travelling tinker and conjuror. He was very clever at legerdemain, and was well known in Melbourne and Collingwood as “Jack the
Conjuror ” His wife used to accompany him in all his rambles, and when either had
taken a little too much drink, the other would wheel him or her in a barrow
to a hut in which they resided in what was then bush, but now forms the outskirts of Collingwood. About eight years ago “Jack ‘ received a sunstroke while on a journey up country, and returned to Melbourne, where he died in the hospital. The wife, who was now getting infirm, went into the Benevolent Asylum, but could not rest there, because, as she said, her old man’s last words to her were that she should not
allow herself to be beholden to the “pariah,” and leaving the institution, she went to
Sergeant Pewtress, whose duties had made him acquainted with her, and through his good offices she was brought under the notice of Mr Sturt, P M , who allowed her a pension of 2s a week She received some aid from the Ladies’ Benevolent Society, and was provided with lodgings in Collingwood by a family who had known her in Tasmania, and thus her last days were passed in comfort. Her age was computed from accounts she had given of the minor historical facts she remembered, and the calculation agreed with her own statements. Elizabeth was born in 1772.

Sir Nils Olav

Colonel-in-Chief Sir Nils Olav is a king penguin who resides in Edinburgh Zoo, Scotland. He is the mascot and Colonel-in-Chief of the Norwegian Royal Guard. Nils was visited by soldiers from the Norwegian Royal Guard on 15 August 2008 and awarded knighthood. The honour was approved by King Harald V. During the ceremony a crowd of several hundred people joined the 130 guardsmen at the zoo to hear a citation from the King read out, which described Nils as a penguin “in every way qualified to receive the honour and dignity of knighthood”. The name ‘Nils Olav’ has also been given to two other king penguins who preceded the current Nils Olav as the King’s Guard’s mascot.

When the Norwegian King’s Guard visited the Edinburgh Military Tattoo of 1961 for a drill display, a lieutenant called Nils Egelien became interested in Edinburgh Zoo’s penguin colony. When the Guards once again returned to Edinburgh in 1972, he arranged for the unit to adopt a penguin. This penguin was named Nils Olav in honour of Nils Egelien, and King Olav V of Norway.

Sir Nils Olav was given the rank of visekorporal (lance corporal) and has been promoted each time the King’s Guard has returned to the zoo. In 1982 he was made corporal, and promoted to sergeant in 1987. Nils Olav died shortly after his promotion to sergeant, and his place of honour was taken by Nils Olav II, his two-year-old near-double. He was promoted in 1993 to the rank of regimental sergeant major. On 18 August 2005, he was appointed as Colonel-in-Chief and on 15 August 2008 he was awarded a knighthood. He is the first penguin to receive such an honour in the Norwegian Army. At the same time a 4-foot-high (1.2 m) bronze statue of Nils Olav was presented to Edinburgh Zoo. The statue’s inscription recognises the King’s Guard and the Military Tattoo. A statue also stands at the Royal Norwegian Guard compound at Huseby, Oslo.

In Norway he is consistently referred to only as the mascot of the King’s Guard, although the plaque on his statue refers to his appointment as Colonel-in-Chief.

 

Frank Gardiner, born in 1830 Scotland and shipped out to Australia as a child with his parents, made an illustrious career out of horse thievery and highway robbery. On 15 June 1862, Gardiner along with Ben Hall, John Gilbert and associates held up a gold escort travelling from Forbes to Bathurst. They stole over £14,000 worth of gold and bank notes – Australia’s biggest gold robbery. In February 1864, New South Wales police traced Gardiner to his hideout in Queensland. He was arrested and sentenced to 32 years of hard labour in July. Ten years later, Governor Hercules Robinson granted him mercy and released him, subject to exile. Gardiner lived in Hong Kong and Francisco before dying in Colorado in 1903. “Colonial rule was constantly challenged by bushrangers – it was a major threat to the central administration,” says Dr Hamish Maxwell-Stewart from the University of Tasmania. “They were turning the tables on the convict state.”

 

On this day …….. 25th of June 1875

In the obituary notices in The Argus newspaper, it appeared the death of a person
named Elizabeth Wickets, at the great age of 103 years. She was a native of Paisley, in Scotland, but at an early age went to Lancashire, where she was
employed as a cotton-weaver. At the time when steam power looms were introduced there was a great uprising of the ignorant weavers, who thought they would lose their employment, and Wickets, who was then a remarkably tall and strong young woman, joined in the disturbances and destroying of looms, and for this, with many others, was transported to Tasmania. In that colony she married a man named John Wickets, who was her second husband, and about the time of the gold fever, the pair came over to this colony of Victoria. The man was a gipsy, and earned a living as a travelling tinker and conjuror. He was very clever at legerdemain, and was well known in Melbourne and Collingwood as “Jack the
Conjuror ” His wife used to accompany him in all his rambles, and when either had
taken a little too much drink, the other would wheel him or her in a barrow
to a hut in which they resided in what was then bush, but now forms the outskirts of Collingwood. About eight years ago “Jack ‘ received a sunstroke while on a journey up country, and returned to Melbourne, where he died in the hospital. The wife, who was now getting infirm, went into the Benevolent Asylum, but could not rest there, because, as she said, her old man’s last words to her were that she should not
allow herself to be beholden to the “pariah,” and leaving the institution, she went to
Sergeant Pewtress, whose duties had made him acquainted with her, and through his good offices she was brought under the notice of Mr Sturt, P M , who allowed her a pension of 2s a week She received some aid from the Ladies’ Benevolent Society, and was provided with lodgings in Collingwood by a family who had known her in Tasmania, and thus her last days were passed in comfort. Her age was computed from accounts she had given of the minor historical facts she remembered, and the calculation agreed with her own statements. Elizabeth was born in 1772.

Sir Nils Olav

Colonel-in-Chief Sir Nils Olav is a king penguin who resides in Edinburgh Zoo, Scotland. He is the mascot and Colonel-in-Chief of the Norwegian Royal Guard. Nils was visited by soldiers from the Norwegian Royal Guard on 15 August 2008 and awarded knighthood. The honour was approved by King Harald V. During the ceremony a crowd of several hundred people joined the 130 guardsmen at the zoo to hear a citation from the King read out, which described Nils as a penguin “in every way qualified to receive the honour and dignity of knighthood”. The name ‘Nils Olav’ has also been given to two other king penguins who preceded the current Nils Olav as the King’s Guard’s mascot.

When the Norwegian King’s Guard visited the Edinburgh Military Tattoo of 1961 for a drill display, a lieutenant called Nils Egelien became interested in Edinburgh Zoo’s penguin colony. When the Guards once again returned to Edinburgh in 1972, he arranged for the unit to adopt a penguin. This penguin was named Nils Olav in honour of Nils Egelien, and King Olav V of Norway.

Sir Nils Olav was given the rank of visekorporal (lance corporal) and has been promoted each time the King’s Guard has returned to the zoo. In 1982 he was made corporal, and promoted to sergeant in 1987. Nils Olav died shortly after his promotion to sergeant, and his place of honour was taken by Nils Olav II, his two-year-old near-double. He was promoted in 1993 to the rank of regimental sergeant major. On 18 August 2005, he was appointed as Colonel-in-Chief and on 15 August 2008 he was awarded a knighthood. He is the first penguin to receive such an honour in the Norwegian Army. At the same time a 4-foot-high (1.2 m) bronze statue of Nils Olav was presented to Edinburgh Zoo. The statue’s inscription recognises the King’s Guard and the Military Tattoo. A statue also stands at the Royal Norwegian Guard compound at Huseby, Oslo.

In Norway he is consistently referred to only as the mascot of the King’s Guard, although the plaque on his statue refers to his appointment as Colonel-in-Chief.

 

On This Day – May 2, 1933

In folklore, the Loch Ness Monster is a being which reputedly inhabits Loch Ness in the Scottish Highlands. It is similar to other supposed lake monsters in Scotland and elsewhere, although its description varies; it is described by most as large. Popular interest and belief in the creature has varied since it was brought to worldwide attention in 1933. Evidence of its existence is anecdotal, with few, disputed photographs and sonar readings.

The most common speculation among believers is that the creature represents a line of long-surviving plesiosaurs.  Most of the scientific community regards the Loch Ness Monster as a myth, explaining sightings as misidentifications of mundane objects, hoaxes, and wishful thinking. The creature has been affectionately called Nessie since the 1940s.

The word “monster” was reportedly applied for the first time to the creature on 2 May 1933 by Alex Campbell, water bailiff for Loch Ness and a part-time journalist, in an Inverness Courier report.  On 4 August 1933 the Courier published a report by Londoner George Spicer that several weeks earlier, while they were driving around the loch, he and his wife saw “the nearest approach to a dragon or pre-historic animal that I have ever seen in my life” trundling across the road toward the loch with “an animal” in its mouth.  Letters began appearing in the Courier, often anonymously, claiming land or water sightings by the writer, their family or acquaintances or remembered stories.  The accounts reached the media, which described a “monster fish”, “sea serpent”, or “dragon” and eventually settled on “Loch Ness monster”.

On 6 December 1933 the first purported photograph of the monster, taken by Hugh Gray, was published in the Daily Express; the Secretary of State for Scotland soon ordered police to prevent any attacks on it.  In 1934, interest was further piqued by the “surgeon’s photograph”. That year, R. T. Gould published an account of the author’s investigation and a record of reports predating 1933. Other authors have claimed sightings of the monster dating to the sixth century AD.

Frank Gardiner, born in 1830 Scotland and shipped out to Australia as a child with his parents, made an illustrious career out of horse thievery and highway robbery. On 15 June 1862, Gardiner along with Ben Hall, John Gilbert and associates held up a gold escort travelling from Forbes to Bathurst. They stole over £14,000 worth of gold and bank notes – Australia’s biggest gold robbery. In February 1864, New South Wales police traced Gardiner to his hideout in Queensland. He was arrested and sentenced to 32 years of hard labour in July. Ten years later, Governor Hercules Robinson granted him mercy and released him, subject to exile. Gardiner lived in Hong Kong and Francisco before dying in Colorado in 1903. “Colonial rule was constantly challenged by bushrangers – it was a major threat to the central administration,” says Dr Hamish Maxwell-Stewart from the University of Tasmania. “They were turning the tables on the convict state.”

 

On this day …….. 25th of June 1875

In the obituary notices in The Argus newspaper, it appeared the death of a person
named Elizabeth Wickets, at the great age of 103 years. She was a native of Paisley, in Scotland, but at an early age went to Lancashire, where she was
employed as a cotton-weaver. At the time when steam power looms were introduced there was a great uprising of the ignorant weavers, who thought they would lose their employment, and Wickets, who was then a remarkably tall and strong young woman, joined in the disturbances and destroying of looms, and for this, with many others, was transported to Tasmania. In that colony she married a man named John Wickets, who was her second husband, and about the time of the gold fever, the pair came over to this colony of Victoria. The man was a gipsy, and earned a living as a travelling tinker and conjuror. He was very clever at legerdemain, and was well known in Melbourne and Collingwood as “Jack the
Conjuror ” His wife used to accompany him in all his rambles, and when either had
taken a little too much drink, the other would wheel him or her in a barrow
to a hut in which they resided in what was then bush, but now forms the outskirts of Collingwood. About eight years ago “Jack ‘ received a sunstroke while on a journey up country, and returned to Melbourne, where he died in the hospital. The wife, who was now getting infirm, went into the Benevolent Asylum, but could not rest there, because, as she said, her old man’s last words to her were that she should not
allow herself to be beholden to the “pariah,” and leaving the institution, she went to
Sergeant Pewtress, whose duties had made him acquainted with her, and through his good offices she was brought under the notice of Mr Sturt, P M , who allowed her a pension of 2s a week She received some aid from the Ladies’ Benevolent Society, and was provided with lodgings in Collingwood by a family who had known her in Tasmania, and thus her last days were passed in comfort. Her age was computed from accounts she had given of the minor historical facts she remembered, and the calculation agreed with her own statements. Elizabeth was born in 1772.

Sir Nils Olav

Colonel-in-Chief Sir Nils Olav is a king penguin who resides in Edinburgh Zoo, Scotland. He is the mascot and Colonel-in-Chief of the Norwegian Royal Guard. Nils was visited by soldiers from the Norwegian Royal Guard on 15 August 2008 and awarded knighthood. The honour was approved by King Harald V. During the ceremony a crowd of several hundred people joined the 130 guardsmen at the zoo to hear a citation from the King read out, which described Nils as a penguin “in every way qualified to receive the honour and dignity of knighthood”. The name ‘Nils Olav’ has also been given to two other king penguins who preceded the current Nils Olav as the King’s Guard’s mascot.

When the Norwegian King’s Guard visited the Edinburgh Military Tattoo of 1961 for a drill display, a lieutenant called Nils Egelien became interested in Edinburgh Zoo’s penguin colony. When the Guards once again returned to Edinburgh in 1972, he arranged for the unit to adopt a penguin. This penguin was named Nils Olav in honour of Nils Egelien, and King Olav V of Norway.

Sir Nils Olav was given the rank of visekorporal (lance corporal) and has been promoted each time the King’s Guard has returned to the zoo. In 1982 he was made corporal, and promoted to sergeant in 1987. Nils Olav died shortly after his promotion to sergeant, and his place of honour was taken by Nils Olav II, his two-year-old near-double. He was promoted in 1993 to the rank of regimental sergeant major. On 18 August 2005, he was appointed as Colonel-in-Chief and on 15 August 2008 he was awarded a knighthood. He is the first penguin to receive such an honour in the Norwegian Army. At the same time a 4-foot-high (1.2 m) bronze statue of Nils Olav was presented to Edinburgh Zoo. The statue’s inscription recognises the King’s Guard and the Military Tattoo. A statue also stands at the Royal Norwegian Guard compound at Huseby, Oslo.

In Norway he is consistently referred to only as the mascot of the King’s Guard, although the plaque on his statue refers to his appointment as Colonel-in-Chief.

 

In January 2016,  it was thought that Nessie had been found.  Turned out to be a movie prop from 1969!

http://mobile.nytimes.com/2016/04/14/world/europe/loch-ness-monster-found-kind-of-not-really.html?referer

On This Day – May 3, 1933

In folklore, the Loch Ness Monster is a being which reputedly inhabits Loch Ness in the Scottish Highlands. It is similar to other supposed lake monsters in Scotland and elsewhere, although its description varies; it is described by most as large. Popular interest and belief in the creature has varied since it was brought to worldwide attention in 1933. Evidence of its existence is anecdotal, with few, disputed photographs and sonar readings.

The most common speculation among believers is that the creature represents a line of long-surviving plesiosaurs.  Most of the scientific community regards the Loch Ness Monster as a myth, explaining sightings as misidentifications of mundane objects, hoaxes, and wishful thinking. The creature has been affectionately called Nessie since the 1940s.

The word “monster” was reportedly applied for the first time to the creature on 2 May 1933 by Alex Campbell, water bailiff for Loch Ness and a part-time journalist, in an Inverness Courier report.  On 4 August 1933 the Courier published a report by Londoner George Spicer that several weeks earlier, while they were driving around the loch, he and his wife saw “the nearest approach to a dragon or pre-historic animal that I have ever seen in my life” trundling across the road toward the loch with “an animal” in its mouth.  Letters began appearing in the Courier, often anonymously, claiming land or water sightings by the writer, their family or acquaintances or remembered stories.  The accounts reached the media, which described a “monster fish”, “sea serpent”, or “dragon” and eventually settled on “Loch Ness monster”.

On 6 December 1933 the first purported photograph of the monster, taken by Hugh Gray, was published in the Daily Express; the Secretary of State for Scotland soon ordered police to prevent any attacks on it.  In 1934, interest was further piqued by the “surgeon’s photograph”. That year, R. T. Gould published an account of the author’s investigation and a record of reports predating 1933. Other authors have claimed sightings of the monster dating to the sixth century AD.