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Solo One was an Australian television series made by Crawford Productions for the Seven Network and premiered on the 18th of June 1976. There were 13 half-hour episodes. The series was a spin-off from the police show Matlock Police with Paul Cronin reprising his role as Sen. Const. Senior Constable Gary Hogan is the officer in charge. In fact, he’s the entire staff of Emerald Police Station. In this Victorian country town, in the Dandnong Rangers, Snr. Constable Gary Hogan becomes involved in the good times and bad that the people of any town go through. He’s sympathetic, but can rough it with the best of them. If there’s a problem in town, just call for Solo One. The show used the original Emerald police residence and police cells – 15 Kilvington st, Emerald. (Both are still standing 2016)

60 years of Australian TV

Homicide premiered on the 20th of October 1964 and ran till 1977. The show was an Australian television police procedural drama series made by production firm Crawford Productions for the Seven Network. It was the television successor to Crawfords’ radio series D24. The series dealt with the homicide squad of the Victorian Police force and the various crimes and cases the detectives are called upon to investigate. Many episodes were based directly on real cases, although the characters (including the detectives) were fictional. 510 episodes were produced, and aired from October 1964 to January 1977. It remains as the longest-running Australian drama series to date. The police station was filmed at the Russell St Police HQ 336/376 Russell St, Melbourne.

Blue Heelers is an Australian police drama series that ran for 12 years, from 1994 to 2006, and depicts the lives of police officers in Mount Thomas, a fictional small town in Victoria. Blue Heelers was first aired on 10 September 1993, with the episode “A Woman’s Place”. The last episode, aired on 4 June 2006, was the 510th episode, “One Day More”. It was produced by Southern Star for the Seven Network. During its 13-season run it won a total of 32 awards and was nominated for a further 50. This included 25 Logie Awards, five of which were the Gold Logie, the most coveted television award in Australia. As well as everyday policing matters, the series deals with many controversial and “touchy” subjects. The series was the first to examine the stressful world of young police officers who are “thrown into the deep end where they are left to sink or swim”. Police procedurals were enormously popular in Australia in the 1960s and 1970s, but by the 1980s they had been replaced by home-grown soap operas and mini-series. Blue Heelers, however, was Australia’s most popular television drama while it lasted. The series drew more than 2.5 million viewers every week at its peak. Along with Homicide, Blue Heelers holds the Australian record for most episodes produced of a weekly prime-time drama. It was also nearly the longest-running series, but Homicide lasted one calendar month longer and, due to five feature-length episodes, had more time on air. Blue Heelers has also gained recognition in the UK, Ireland, New Zealand, Canada and other countries. It has been sold to 108 territories. Blue Heelers launched the careers of many Australian actors, such as Lisa McCune, Grant Bowler, Ditch Davey, Rachel Gordon, Tasma Walton, Charlie Clausen and Jane Allsop. While many of these actors are still best known for their work on Blue Heelers, some have gone on to bigger roles. Many other actors of today also appeared in guest roles, including Hugh Jackman, Charles ‘Bud’ Tingwell, Peter O’Brien and John Howard. John Wood and Julie Nihill remained with Blue Heelers during its entire 12-year run, portraying Senior Sergeant Tom Croydon and the publican Chris Riley respectively.

60 years of Australian TV

Solo One was an Australian television series made by Crawford Productions for the Seven Network and premiered on the 18th of June 1976. There were 13 half-hour episodes. The series was a spin-off from the police show Matlock Police with Paul Cronin reprising his role as Sen. Const. Senior Constable Gary Hogan is the officer in charge. In fact, he’s the entire staff of Emerald Police Station. In this Victorian country town, in the Dandnong Rangers, Snr. Constable Gary Hogan becomes involved in the good times and bad that the people of any town go through. He’s sympathetic, but can rough it with the best of them. If there’s a problem in town, just call for Solo One. The show used the original Emerald police residence and police cells – 15 Kilvington st, Emerald. (Both are still standing 2016)

Matlock Police was an Australian television police drama series made by Crawford Productions for the 10 Network between 1971 and 1976. The series focused on the police station and crime in the Victorian town of Matlock and the surrounding district, and the backgrounds and personal lives of the main policemen.

The series was the 10 Network’s attempt to come up with a police show to rival Homicide (shown by the Seven Network) and Division 4 (on the Nine Network). Matlock Police was different from its Melbourne-based predecessors by being set in a small country town, the fictional Matlock, Victoria (a real Matlock does exist in Victoria, but it is much smaller than the town depicted by this series, which is loosely based on Shepparton). These program’s introduction featured an overhead shot of a town with a divided road, thought to be of Bairnsdale in Victoria. Series writers had a reference manual giving full details of the town’s geography, amenities, social structure, etc., as well as that of the surrounding area – neighbouring towns included Wilga, Chinaman’s Creek, Possum’s Creek and Burrabri, and there was an offshoot of the Great Dividing Range called the Candowies. The town’s colourful history included the local Aboriginal tribe (the ‘Bangerang’), the town founder (George Matlock), a gold rush, a bushranger (‘Holy’ Joe Cooper – so called both for his theft of a shipment of holey dollars and because he was a preacher) and a town patriarchy (the Falconers). About the only landmark the Matlock district lacked for dramatic purposes was a beach. The first episode was broadcast in Melbourne on 22nd of February 1971. Initially filmed in black and white, the series switched to colour in episode 162, “Loggerheads”. Matlock Police was cancelled in 1975 after 229 episodes had been produced. Matlock Police Station was in fact the Ringwood Police Station in Melbourne. A new frontage has been added to the building.

60 years of Australian TV

Homicide premiered on the 20th of October 1964 and ran till 1977. The show was an Australian television police procedural drama series made by production firm Crawford Productions for the Seven Network. It was the television successor to Crawfords’ radio series D24. The series dealt with the homicide squad of the Victorian Police force and the various crimes and cases the detectives are called upon to investigate. Many episodes were based directly on real cases, although the characters (including the detectives) were fictional. 510 episodes were produced, and aired from October 1964 to January 1977. It remains as the longest-running Australian drama series to date. The police station was filmed at the Russell St Police HQ 336/376 Russell St, Melbourne.

60 years of Australian TV

Blue Heelers is an Australian police drama series that ran for 12 years, from 1994 to 2006, and depicts the lives of police officers in Mount Thomas, a fictional small town in Victoria. Blue Heelers was first aired on 10 September 1993, with the episode “A Woman’s Place”. The last episode, aired on 4 June 2006, was the 510th episode, “One Day More”. It was produced by Southern Star for the Seven Network. During its 13-season run it won a total of 32 awards and was nominated for a further 50. This included 25 Logie Awards, five of which were the Gold Logie, the most coveted television award in Australia. As well as everyday policing matters, the series deals with many controversial and “touchy” subjects. The series was the first to examine the stressful world of young police officers who are “thrown into the deep end where they are left to sink or swim”. Police procedurals were enormously popular in Australia in the 1960s and 1970s, but by the 1980s they had been replaced by home-grown soap operas and mini-series. Blue Heelers, however, was Australia’s most popular television drama while it lasted. The series drew more than 2.5 million viewers every week at its peak. Along with Homicide, Blue Heelers holds the Australian record for most episodes produced of a weekly prime-time drama. It was also nearly the longest-running series, but Homicide lasted one calendar month longer and, due to five feature-length episodes, had more time on air. Blue Heelers has also gained recognition in the UK, Ireland, New Zealand, Canada and other countries. It has been sold to 108 territories. Blue Heelers launched the careers of many Australian actors, such as Lisa McCune, Grant Bowler, Ditch Davey, Rachel Gordon, Tasma Walton, Charlie Clausen and Jane Allsop. While many of these actors are still best known for their work on Blue Heelers, some have gone on to bigger roles. Many other actors of today also appeared in guest roles, including Hugh Jackman, Charles ‘Bud’ Tingwell, Peter O’Brien and John Howard. John Wood and Julie Nihill remained with Blue Heelers during its entire 12-year run, portraying Senior Sergeant Tom Croydon and the publican Chris Riley respectively.

60 years of Australian TV

Solo One was an Australian television series made by Crawford Productions for the Seven Network and premiered on the 18th of June 1976. There were 13 half-hour episodes. The series was a spin-off from the police show Matlock Police with Paul Cronin reprising his role as Sen. Const. Senior Constable Gary Hogan is the officer in charge. In fact, he’s the entire staff of Emerald Police Station. In this Victorian country town, in the Dandnong Rangers, Snr. Constable Gary Hogan becomes involved in the good times and bad that the people of any town go through. He’s sympathetic, but can rough it with the best of them. If there’s a problem in town, just call for Solo One. The show used the original Emerald police residence and police cells – 15 Kilvington st, Emerald. (Both are still standing 2016)

60 years of Australian TV

Matlock Police was an Australian television police drama series made by Crawford Productions for the 10 Network between 1971 and 1976. The series focused on the police station and crime in the Victorian town of Matlock and the surrounding district, and the backgrounds and personal lives of the main policemen.
The series was the 10 Network’s attempt to come up with a police show to rival Homicide (shown by the Seven Network) and Division 4 (on the Nine Network). Matlock Police was different from its Melbourne-based predecessors by being set in a small country town, the fictional Matlock, Victoria (a real Matlock does exist in Victoria, but it is much smaller than the town depicted by this series, which is loosely based on Shepparton). These program’s introduction featured an overhead shot of a town with a divided road, thought to be of Bairnsdale in Victoria. Series writers had a reference manual giving full details of the town’s geography, amenities, social structure, etc., as well as that of the surrounding area – neighbouring towns included Wilga, Chinaman’s Creek, Possum’s Creek and Burrabri, and there was an offshoot of the Great Dividing Range called the Candowies. The town’s colourful history included the local Aboriginal tribe (the ‘Bangerang’), the town founder (George Matlock), a gold rush, a bushranger (‘Holy’ Joe Cooper – so called both for his theft of a shipment of holey dollars and because he was a preacher) and a town patriarchy (the Falconers). About the only landmark the Matlock district lacked for dramatic purposes was a beach. The first episode was broadcast in Melbourne on 22nd of February 1971. Initially filmed in black and white, the series switched to colour in episode 162, “Loggerheads”. Matlock Police was cancelled in 1975 after 229 episodes had been produced. Matlock Police Station was in fact the Ringwood Police Station in Melbourne. A new frontage has been added to the building.