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No one knows when Ned Kelly was born:

True. What we do know is that Ned was the third of 12 children born to Ellen Kelly (from three different fathers). There is no clear evidence of his actual birth, but it was most likely 1854 or 1855, near Beveridge north of Melbourne, meaning he was just 25 or 26 when he died.

Ned Kelly was illiterate:
False. There are enough surviving examples of Ned’s handwriting to know that he could write. This myth most likely evolved from the belief that fellow Kelly Gang member, Joe Byrne, penned the famous Jerilderie letter. This letter has been described as Ned Kelly’s manifesto and is a direct account of the Kelly Gang and the events with which they were associated.

How did he wear such a heavy helmet?
If you have ever seen or tried on a replica of one of the Kelly gang’s helmets, you’ll be struck by how heavy they are and how much they cut into the collar bone. The fact is that the weight of the helmet was not meant to be borne on the collar bones at all. The helmets have holes punched on front, back and sides of each helmet, through which leather straps were strung, meaning most of the weight was felt on top of the wearer’s head. Ned Kelly is reported to have worn a woollen cap to pad his head.

A film about Ned Kelly was the world’s first feature film:
True. It is often reported that Charles Tait’s 1906 film, The Story of the Kelly Gang, was the world’s first full-length feature film. Its first screening was at the Athenaeum Hall on December 26, 1906, and is alleged to have prompted five children in Ballarat to hold up a group of schoolchildren at gunpoint. This resulted in the Victorian Chief Secretary banning the film in towns with strong Kelly connections. And for many years the film was thought to be lost, but segments were found in various locations, including some found on a rubbish dump.

In 2007 the film was inscribed on the UNESCO Memory of the World Register for being the world’s first fill-length feature film.

Ned Kelly’s last words were “Such is life”.
Many believe that the last utterance by Ned Kelly just before his hanging were three simple word, “Such is life”. Whether uttered with weary resignation or an acceptance of misfortune, the notion that the quote is attributed to Ned Kelly survives today (even inspiring one or two tattoos).

But what Ned Kelly actually said as his last words is uncertain. Some newspapers at the time certainly reported the words “Such is life”, while a reporter standing on the jail floor wrote that Ned’s last words were, “Ah well! It’s come to this at last.” But one of the closest persons to Ned on the gallows, the gaol warden, wrote in his diary that Kelly opened his mouth and mumbled something that he couldn’t hear.

Ned Kelly courtroom curse killed the judge:
It is true that judge Sir Redmond Barry died 12 days after Ned Kelly was executed. The two men, Kelly and Barry, had been antagonists for some time, so after being sentenced to death at his trial, Ned Kelly famously replied to Sir Redmond Barry, “I will see you there where I go” or a version of that quote.

Ned Kelly was executed on the November 11, 1880, and Sir Redmond Barry died on the 23rd of the same month. However Barry’s certificate did not list the cause of death as “curse”, rather it is more likely that the judge died from a combination of pneumonia and septicaemia from an untreated carbuncle.

If you have a Ned Kelly tattoo you are more likely to die violently:
Depending on how you interpret the forensic data, wearing a Ned Kelly tattoo can be very dangerous. A study from the University of Adelaide found that corpses with Ned Kelly tattoos were much more likely to have died by murder and suicide. But it was a pretty small sample size.

 

On this day …….. 29th of October 1880

Ned Kelly sentenced to execution

Ned Kelly, Australia’s most famous bushranger, was born in December 1854 in Victoria, Australia. Kelly was twelve when his father died, and he was subsequently required to leave school to take on the new position as head of the family. Shortly after this, the Kellys moved to Glenrowan. As a teenager, Ned became involved in petty crimes, regularly targetting the wealthy landowners. He gradually progressed to crimes of increasing seriousness and violence, including bank robbery and murder, soon becoming a hunted man. Many of Ned Kelly’s peers held him in high regard for his stand of usually only ambushing wealthy landowners, and helped to keep his whereabouts from the police, despite the high reward posted for his capture. However, he was betrayed to the police whilst holding dozens of people hostage in the Glenrowan Inn in June, 1880. Wearing their famous armour, the Kelly brothers held a shootout with police. The Kelly brothers were killed, but Ned was shot twenty-eight times in the legs, being unprotected by the armour. He survived to stand trial, and was sentenced to death by hanging, by Judge Redmond Barry on 29 October 1880. Ned Kelly was hanged in Melbourne on 11 November 1880.

ON THIS DAY…… 28th August 1871

A most deliberate and cruel murder of a Chinaman was committed on the Beechworth- Myrtleford Road. Two Chinamen in a cart named Ah Woo and Ah Cow, were stopped by James Quinn who offered them a shilling for a ride, which they agreed. Not 30 yards down the track Quinn attacked Ah Cow so violently that the Chinaman passed out. Quinn then threw his lifeless body from the cart. A struggle then began between Ah Woo and Quinn until Ah Woo was also unconscious. Stopping the cart Quinn then drowned Ah Woo in a water race beside the road.

Witness watched as Quinn took 40 pounds from his victim, before running into the hills. The police under the guidance of Inspector Smith were able to find Quinn, and had him brought to the Beechworth Goal were four witnesses identified him as the killer. Quinn murder trial was on the 14th of October 1871 in the Beechworth Circuit Court. The Judge Sir Redmond Barry, known as the hanging Judge, presided over the case, which finished at midnight. On passing the death sentence Sir Redmond asked James “do you have anything to say?” Quinn replied “It’s not my fault, my wife made me do it.” On the morning of 14th of November at 9.00am Quinn was walked from the condemned man’s cell with Father Moran and Bamford the hangman. On reaching the gallows Quinn asked if he could speak, “I wish to say something. I am going to die an innocent man. I blame my wife for what has happened to me. She and her friends got me to come over from Tasmania and then they robbed me of 50 pounds.” Bamford then tied Quinn’s legs and his hands behind his back, placed a white hood over his head and a rope around his neck. Quinn said “She brought me to this, God Help Me.” The lever was pulled and Quinn dropped to his death After his execution it was discovered that the gates of the gaol had not been opened and the official witnesses, numbering 70 in total, hadn’t been let in. The gates were hastily opened but the public could only see Quinn’s lifeless body swinging from the rope. Quinn’s description after death was height 6 foot, black hair, hazel eyes, scar on left eyebrow, long scar on right shoulder and two scars on right breast

 

No one knows when Ned Kelly was born:

True. What we do know is that Ned was the third of 12 children born to Ellen Kelly (from three different fathers). There is no clear evidence of his actual birth, but it was most likely 1854 or 1855, near Beveridge north of Melbourne, meaning he was just 25 or 26 when he died.

Ned Kelly was illiterate:
False. There are enough surviving examples of Ned’s handwriting to know that he could write. This myth most likely evolved from the belief that fellow Kelly Gang member, Joe Byrne, penned the famous Jerilderie letter. This letter has been described as Ned Kelly’s manifesto and is a direct account of the Kelly Gang and the events with which they were associated.

How did he wear such a heavy helmet?
If you have ever seen or tried on a replica of one of the Kelly gang’s helmets, you’ll be struck by how heavy they are and how much they cut into the collar bone. The fact is that the weight of the helmet was not meant to be borne on the collar bones at all. The helmets have holes punched on front, back and sides of each helmet, through which leather straps were strung, meaning most of the weight was felt on top of the wearer’s head. Ned Kelly is reported to have worn a woollen cap to pad his head.

A film about Ned Kelly was the world’s first feature film:
True. It is often reported that Charles Tait’s 1906 film, The Story of the Kelly Gang, was the world’s first full-length feature film. Its first screening was at the Athenaeum Hall on December 26, 1906, and is alleged to have prompted five children in Ballarat to hold up a group of schoolchildren at gunpoint. This resulted in the Victorian Chief Secretary banning the film in towns with strong Kelly connections. And for many years the film was thought to be lost, but segments were found in various locations, including some found on a rubbish dump.

In 2007 the film was inscribed on the UNESCO Memory of the World Register for being the world’s first fill-length feature film.

Ned Kelly’s last words were “Such is life”.
Many believe that the last utterance by Ned Kelly just before his hanging were three simple word, “Such is life”. Whether uttered with weary resignation or an acceptance of misfortune, the notion that the quote is attributed to Ned Kelly survives today (even inspiring one or two tattoos).

But what Ned Kelly actually said as his last words is uncertain. Some newspapers at the time certainly reported the words “Such is life”, while a reporter standing on the jail floor wrote that Ned’s last words were, “Ah well! It’s come to this at last.” But one of the closest persons to Ned on the gallows, the gaol warden, wrote in his diary that Kelly opened his mouth and mumbled something that he couldn’t hear.

Ned Kelly courtroom curse killed the judge:
It is true that judge Sir Redmond Barry died 12 days after Ned Kelly was executed. The two men, Kelly and Barry, had been antagonists for some time, so after being sentenced to death at his trial, Ned Kelly famously replied to Sir Redmond Barry, “I will see you there where I go” or a version of that quote.

Ned Kelly was executed on the November 11, 1880, and Sir Redmond Barry died on the 23rd of the same month. However Barry’s certificate did not list the cause of death as “curse”, rather it is more likely that the judge died from a combination of pneumonia and septicaemia from an untreated carbuncle.

If you have a Ned Kelly tattoo you are more likely to die violently:
Depending on how you interpret the forensic data, wearing a Ned Kelly tattoo can be very dangerous. A study from the University of Adelaide found that corpses with Ned Kelly tattoos were much more likely to have died by murder and suicide. But it was a pretty small sample size.

 

ON THIS DAY ……. 29th March 1875

A painful accident happened to his Honour Sir Redmond Barry (judge who sentenced Ned Kelly to death) on this day in 1875. Barry was returning in his buggy to his farm at Nunawading, when his horse bolted in going down a hill, and upset the vehicle. Sir Redmond was thrown out with considerable violence, falling upon his left arm, which was broken by the concussion. He was shortly afterwards picked up by a gentleman who was driving past, and conveyed to town. Dr Barker was immediately called in, due to swollen state of the limb it was thought better to postpone setting the broken bone until the next day.

 

 

On This Day – February 4, 1875

An interesting train accident happened on the 4th of February 1875, which almost took the life of Victoria’s most famous judge, Sir Redmond Barry. Barry known as the hanging Judge and the man who sentenced bushranger Ned Kelly to be executed, was travelling by train from Toowoomba to Warwick in Queensland. The train, which consisted of a saloon car, two composite carriages, a break van, two horse boxes, two sheep vans, and an open wagon was speeding along, about three miles past the Cambooya station when it was struck by a blast of wind of hurricane force. A storm of wind, rain and hail was raging, and such was its strength the wind the whole train was lifted of the line. The saloon carriage in which Sir Redmond Barry was travelling, next to the engine, and the composite carriage, which followed it, turned over on their side, and the next carriage smashed into the end of the saloon, smashing the woodwork and projecting a number of formidable splinters where a moment before the distinguished traveller had been seated. Sir Redmond had but a moment before the accident risen to close the windows against the increasing storm, and by a happy chance reseated himself at the opposite end of the carriage. The carriage next in order settled at an angle of about sixty five degrees, while the remaining wagons, came to a stop in all sorts of positions. Amazingly no one was serious injury. This poses the question if Sir Redmond Barry had of been killed in this accident, would Ned Kelly have be sentenced to be executed?

 

On this day …….. 27th of January 1868

How easy history can be changed. On this day in 1868 a young Ned Kelly, his brothers and sisters, their mother and her sister were rescued from almost certain death in a house fire, which had been deliberately lit. The culprit was Ellen’s brother in law, James Kelly. Kelly was sentenced to death by Sir Redmond Barry. The sentence was commuted to ten years. James Kelly however would die in the Beechworth Lunatic Asylum.

 

On this day …….. 29th of October 1880

Ned Kelly sentenced to execution

Ned Kelly, Australia’s most famous bushranger, was born in December 1854 in Victoria, Australia. Kelly was twelve when his father died, and he was subsequently required to leave school to take on the new position as head of the family. Shortly after this, the Kellys moved to Glenrowan. As a teenager, Ned became involved in petty crimes, regularly targetting the wealthy landowners. He gradually progressed to crimes of increasing seriousness and violence, including bank robbery and murder, soon becoming a hunted man. Many of Ned Kelly’s peers held him in high regard for his stand of usually only ambushing wealthy landowners, and helped to keep his whereabouts from the police, despite the high reward posted for his capture. However, he was betrayed to the police whilst holding dozens of people hostage in the Glenrowan Inn in June, 1880. Wearing their famous armour, the Kelly brothers held a shootout with police. The Kelly brothers were killed, but Ned was shot twenty-eight times in the legs, being unprotected by the armour. He survived to stand trial, and was sentenced to death by hanging, by Judge Redmond Barry on 29 October 1880. Ned Kelly was hanged in Melbourne on 11 November 1880.

ON THIS DAY…… 28th August 1871

A most deliberate and cruel murder of a Chinaman was committed on the Beechworth- Myrtleford Road. Two Chinamen in a cart named Ah Woo and Ah Cow, were stopped by James Quinn who offered them a shilling for a ride, which they agreed. Not 30 yards down the track Quinn attacked Ah Cow so violently that the Chinaman passed out. Quinn then threw his lifeless body from the cart. A struggle then began between Ah Woo and Quinn until Ah Woo was also unconscious. Stopping the cart Quinn then drowned Ah Woo in a water race beside the road.

Witness watched as Quinn took 40 pounds from his victim, before running into the hills. The police under the guidance of Inspector Smith were able to find Quinn, and had him brought to the Beechworth Goal were four witnesses identified him as the killer. Quinn murder trial was on the 14th of October 1871 in the Beechworth Circuit Court. The Judge Sir Redmond Barry, known as the hanging Judge, presided over the case, which finished at midnight. On passing the death sentence Sir Redmond asked James “do you have anything to say?” Quinn replied “It’s not my fault, my wife made me do it.” On the morning of 14th of November at 9.00am Quinn was walked from the condemned man’s cell with Father Moran and Bamford the hangman. On reaching the gallows Quinn asked if he could speak, “I wish to say something. I am going to die an innocent man. I blame my wife for what has happened to me. She and her friends got me to come over from Tasmania and then they robbed me of 50 pounds.” Bamford then tied Quinn’s legs and his hands behind his back, placed a white hood over his head and a rope around his neck. Quinn said “She brought me to this, God Help Me.” The lever was pulled and Quinn dropped to his death After his execution it was discovered that the gates of the gaol had not been opened and the official witnesses, numbering 70 in total, hadn’t been let in. The gates were hastily opened but the public could only see Quinn’s lifeless body swinging from the rope. Quinn’s description after death was height 6 foot, black hair, hazel eyes, scar on left eyebrow, long scar on right shoulder and two scars on right breast

 

No one knows when Ned Kelly was born:

True. What we do know is that Ned was the third of 12 children born to Ellen Kelly (from three different fathers). There is no clear evidence of his actual birth, but it was most likely 1854 or 1855, near Beveridge north of Melbourne, meaning he was just 25 or 26 when he died.

Ned Kelly was illiterate:
False. There are enough surviving examples of Ned’s handwriting to know that he could write. This myth most likely evolved from the belief that fellow Kelly Gang member, Joe Byrne, penned the famous Jerilderie letter. This letter has been described as Ned Kelly’s manifesto and is a direct account of the Kelly Gang and the events with which they were associated.

How did he wear such a heavy helmet?
If you have ever seen or tried on a replica of one of the Kelly gang’s helmets, you’ll be struck by how heavy they are and how much they cut into the collar bone. The fact is that the weight of the helmet was not meant to be borne on the collar bones at all. The helmets have holes punched on front, back and sides of each helmet, through which leather straps were strung, meaning most of the weight was felt on top of the wearer’s head. Ned Kelly is reported to have worn a woollen cap to pad his head.

A film about Ned Kelly was the world’s first feature film:
True. It is often reported that Charles Tait’s 1906 film, The Story of the Kelly Gang, was the world’s first full-length feature film. Its first screening was at the Athenaeum Hall on December 26, 1906, and is alleged to have prompted five children in Ballarat to hold up a group of schoolchildren at gunpoint. This resulted in the Victorian Chief Secretary banning the film in towns with strong Kelly connections. And for many years the film was thought to be lost, but segments were found in various locations, including some found on a rubbish dump.

In 2007 the film was inscribed on the UNESCO Memory of the World Register for being the world’s first fill-length feature film.

Ned Kelly’s last words were “Such is life”.
Many believe that the last utterance by Ned Kelly just before his hanging were three simple word, “Such is life”. Whether uttered with weary resignation or an acceptance of misfortune, the notion that the quote is attributed to Ned Kelly survives today (even inspiring one or two tattoos).

But what Ned Kelly actually said as his last words is uncertain. Some newspapers at the time certainly reported the words “Such is life”, while a reporter standing on the jail floor wrote that Ned’s last words were, “Ah well! It’s come to this at last.” But one of the closest persons to Ned on the gallows, the gaol warden, wrote in his diary that Kelly opened his mouth and mumbled something that he couldn’t hear.

Ned Kelly courtroom curse killed the judge:
It is true that judge Sir Redmond Barry died 12 days after Ned Kelly was executed. The two men, Kelly and Barry, had been antagonists for some time, so after being sentenced to death at his trial, Ned Kelly famously replied to Sir Redmond Barry, “I will see you there where I go” or a version of that quote.

Ned Kelly was executed on the November 11, 1880, and Sir Redmond Barry died on the 23rd of the same month. However Barry’s certificate did not list the cause of death as “curse”, rather it is more likely that the judge died from a combination of pneumonia and septicaemia from an untreated carbuncle.

If you have a Ned Kelly tattoo you are more likely to die violently:
Depending on how you interpret the forensic data, wearing a Ned Kelly tattoo can be very dangerous. A study from the University of Adelaide found that corpses with Ned Kelly tattoos were much more likely to have died by murder and suicide. But it was a pretty small sample size.

 

ON THIS DAY ……. 29th March 1875

A painful accident happened to his Honour Sir Redmond Barry (judge who sentenced Ned Kelly to death) on this day in 1875. Barry was returning in his buggy to his farm at Nunawading, when his horse bolted in going down a hill, and upset the vehicle. Sir Redmond was thrown out with considerable violence, falling upon his left arm, which was broken by the concussion. He was shortly afterwards picked up by a gentleman who was driving past, and conveyed to town. Dr Barker was immediately called in, due to swollen state of the limb it was thought better to postpone setting the broken bone until the next day.

 

 

On This Day – February 4, 1875

An interesting train accident happened on the 4th of February 1875, which almost took the life of Victoria’s most famous judge, Sir Redmond Barry. Barry known as the hanging Judge and the man who sentenced bushranger Ned Kelly to be executed, was travelling by train from Toowoomba to Warwick in Queensland. The train, which consisted of a saloon car, two composite carriages, a break van, two horse boxes, two sheep vans, and an open wagon was speeding along, about three miles past the Cambooya station when it was struck by a blast of wind of hurricane force. A storm of wind, rain and hail was raging, and such was its strength the wind the whole train was lifted of the line. The saloon carriage in which Sir Redmond Barry was travelling, next to the engine, and the composite carriage, which followed it, turned over on their side, and the next carriage smashed into the end of the saloon, smashing the woodwork and projecting a number of formidable splinters where a moment before the distinguished traveller had been seated. Sir Redmond had but a moment before the accident risen to close the windows against the increasing storm, and by a happy chance reseated himself at the opposite end of the carriage. The carriage next in order settled at an angle of about sixty five degrees, while the remaining wagons, came to a stop in all sorts of positions. Amazingly no one was serious injury. This poses the question if Sir Redmond Barry had of been killed in this accident, would Ned Kelly have be sentenced to be executed?