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ON THIS DAY – JULY 6, 1887

Bridget Mephan arrived from Wagga this afternoon. Numbers of people assembled at the various stations along the line, but there was no demonstration of feeling towards the prisoner, she appears depressed, and say’s nothing, She will be brought up on Monday, and remanded. A reticule and papers in her possession were blood stained. Her dress and other articles will be taken to Melbourne on Monday to be analysed. The murdered woman was buried before Mrs Mephan’s arrival.

Bridget Mephan, described as a laundress, was charged at the Wagga Police Court yesterday with the murder of her sister, Annie Callow, at Wangaratta, last Wednesday. The evidence of Senior-sergeant Powell was to the effect that he arrested the accused at Fuller’s Hotel, Wagga, on Friday morning, and charged her with the murder. She made no reply, but afterwards stated that she was not at Wangaratta at the time. On a small hand-bag in the prisoner’s possession were spots of blood, which she said were from a scratch caused by the handle of the bag, but on this there were no stains. On the application of the police the prisoner was remanded to Wangaratta, and was sent away by the morning train. The accused had been an old resident of Wagga.

ON THIS DAY…… 3rd September 1890

A Magisterial enquiry has been held concerning the death of the little girl named Veronica O’Neill on this day in 1890, after being severely beaten with a stick about the head and body by her elder sister Eleanor, aged nine and a half years. The latter at the enquiry detailed the circumstance, and said she had always hated the deceased, because she always got everything that came into the house and was always getting witness into trouble. The Magistrate ordered her to be charged with the wilful murder of her sister.

 

 

 

ON THIS DAY…… 25th August 1902

On August 25th, 1902, the landlady of this residence, Goldar Mantel, entered the room of one of the residents, Rachael Samuel. Rachael was a young woman of “respectable parentage” who for whatever reason had been abandoned by her parents five years previously and was earning a living as a dressmaker. Rachael’s younger sister had been up to their sister’s room when one of them came down and asked Mrs Mantel for a bucket. Becoming suspicious, Mrs Mantel returned to the room and pulled back the covers on the bed to discover a newborn baby girl, who had been partially burnt. When asked what she had done, Rachael replied she could not help it! A midwife, Mary Ann Beattie, was called to examine Rachael and the baby. Rachael was described as being in a low state as she was severely haemorrhaging. Mary Ann did what she could to save the life of the baby girl but she soon passed away. The head and body of the baby girl where charred and cause of death at the post mortem was haemorrhage and shock from burns.

Rachael was charged with wilful murder and went to trial. She quite feeble during the trial and was seated on a chair for the duration. A nurse was also on standby with smelling salts and Rachael became quite distressed at times. At trial, Rachael was found not guilty and discharged.

 

ON THIS DAY – JULY 6, 1887

Bridget Mephan arrived from Wagga this afternoon. Numbers of people assembled at the various stations along the line, but there was no demonstration of feeling towards the prisoner, she appears depressed, and say’s nothing, She will be brought up on Monday, and remanded. A reticule and papers in her possession were blood stained. Her dress and other articles will be taken to Melbourne on Monday to be analysed. The murdered woman was buried before Mrs Mephan’s arrival.

Bridget Mephan, described as a laundress, was charged at the Wagga Police Court yesterday with the murder of her sister, Annie Callow, at Wangaratta, last Wednesday. The evidence of Senior-sergeant Powell was to the effect that he arrested the accused at Fuller’s Hotel, Wagga, on Friday morning, and charged her with the murder. She made no reply, but afterwards stated that she was not at Wangaratta at the time. On a small hand-bag in the prisoner’s possession were spots of blood, which she said were from a scratch caused by the handle of the bag, but on this there were no stains. On the application of the police the prisoner was remanded to Wangaratta, and was sent away by the morning train. The accused had been an old resident of Wagga.

ON THIS DAY…… 3rd September 1890

A Magisterial enquiry has been held concerning the death of the little girl named Veronica O’Neill on this day in 1890, after being severely beaten with a stick about the head and body by her elder sister Eleanor, aged nine and a half years. The latter at the enquiry detailed the circumstance, and said she had always hated the deceased, because she always got everything that came into the house and was always getting witness into trouble. The Magistrate ordered her to be charged with the wilful murder of her sister.

 

 

 

ON THIS DAY…… 25th August 1902

On August 25th, 1902, the landlady of this residence, Goldar Mantel, entered the room of one of the residents, Rachael Samuels. Rachael was a young woman of “respectable parentage” who for whatever reason had been abandoned by her parents five years previously and was earning a living as a dressmaker. Rachael’s younger sister had been up to their sister’s room when one of them came down and asked Mrs Mantel for a bucket. Becoming suspicious, Mrs Mantel returned to the room and pulled back the covers on the bed to discover a newborn baby girl, who had been partially burnt. When asked what she had done, Rachael replied she could not help it! A midwife, Mary Ann Beattie, was called to examine Rachael and the baby. Rachael was described as being in a low state as she was severely haemorrhaging. Mary Ann did what she could to save the life of the baby girl but she soon passed away. The head and body of the baby girl where charred and cause of death at the post mortem was haemorrhage and shock from burns.

Rachael was charged with wilful murder and went to trial. She quite feeble during the trial and was seated on a chair for the duration. A nurse was also on standby with smelling salts and Rachael became quite distressed at times. At trial, Rachael was found not guilty and discharged.

 

ON THIS DAY – JULY 6, 1887

Bridget Mephan arrived from Wagga this afternoon. Numbers of people assembled at the various stations along the line, but there was no demonstration of feeling towards the prisoner, she appears depressed, and say’s nothing, She will be brought up on Monday, and remanded. A reticule and papers in her possession were blood stained. Her dress and other articles will be taken to Melbourne on Monday to be analysed. The murdered woman was buried before Mrs Mephan’s arrival.

Bridget Mephan, described as a laundress, was charged at the Wagga Police Court yesterday with the murder of her sister, Annie Callow, at Wangaratta, last Wednesday. The evidence of Senior-sergeant Powell was to the effect that he arrested the accused at Fuller’s Hotel, Wagga, on Friday morning, and charged her with the murder. She made no reply, but afterwards stated that she was not at Wangaratta at the time. On a small hand-bag in the prisoner’s possession were spots of blood, which she said were from a scratch caused by the handle of the bag, but on this there were no stains. On the application of the police the prisoner was remanded to Wangaratta, and was sent away by the morning train. The accused had been an old resident of Wagga.