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The headless remains of Australia’s most infamous criminal, Ned Kelly, have been identified. Victoria state Attorney General Robert Clark said that a team of forensic scientists identified Kelly’s remains among those exhumed from a mass grave at Pentridge prison in Melbourne in 2009. Kelly led a gang of bank robbers in Victoria in the 19th century. Today he is considered by many Australians to be a Robin Hood-like figure who stood up to the British colonial authorities of the time. He was executed in 1880, but his final resting place had long been a mystery. “To think a group of scientists could identify the body of a man who was executed more than 130 years ago, moved and buried in a haphazard fashion among 33 other prisoners, most of whom are not identified, is amazing,” said Victoria Attorney General Robert Clark. The Sydney Morning Herald reported that investigators revealed that an almost complete skeleton of the outlaw was found buried in a wooden ax box. Clark said DNA analysis and other tests were used to confirm the skeleton is Kelly’s. The Morning Herald said DNA samples were taken from Melbourne school teacher Leigh Olver, who is the great-grandson of Kelly’s sister Ellen. Kelly’s skull was stolen from a display case at the Old Melbourne Gaol in 1978. A 2009 claim by a West Australian farmer, Tom Baxter, that he had Kelly’s skull was eventually rejected, but led to the investigation that uncovered his bones. The Morning Herald said that investigators believed that Kelly’s remains were transferred from the Old Melbourne Gaol to the Pentridge prison in 1929, then exhumed with the remains of 33 other people during the investigation in 2009. Baxter had handed the Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine what he said was the stolen skull, which featured the inscription “E. Kelly” on its side — Kelly’s actual first name was Edward. Baxter has not revealed how he got ahold of the skull. Scientists at the institute set out to determine who the skull belonged to, and to identify Kelly’s full remains among the tangle of skeletons exhumed from the Pentridge site. Through CT scans, X-rays, anthropological and historical research and DNA analysis, the team finally identified one skeleton as Kelly’s. Most of its head was missing. Stephen Cordner, the institute’s director, said the DNA left no doubt the skeleton was Kelly’s. Tests on the remains also uncovered evidence of shotgun wounds that matched those Kelly suffered during his criminal rampage. “The wear and tear of the skeleton is a little bit more than would be expected for a 25-year-old today,” Cordner said. “But such was Ned’s life, this is hardly surprising.” As for Baxter’s “E. Kelly” skull? Not Ned’s. The whereabouts of Kelly’s skull remain a mystery, Cordner said. Descendant Olver told reporters in Melbourne that he hoped his notorious ancestor will finally be laid to rest in a place of dignity. “It’s such a great relief to finally have this side of the story resolved,” Olver said. Kelly’s story has been documented in several books and movies, including a film starring Rolling Stones frontman Mick Jagger and another starring late actor Heath Ledger. Kelly’s use of homemade armor to protect himself from police bullets was even given a nod during the 2000 Sydney Olympics, when actors on stilts dressed in similar armor were featured in the opening ceremony. “I think a lot of Australians connect with Ned Kelly and they’re proud of the heritage that has developed as a result of our connection with Ned Kelly and the story of Ned Kelly,” Olver said. “In our family, he was a hero.”

herald Sun

 

On This Day – June 27, 1934

Charged with having murdered Daniel George Robinson, a trapper, on June 27, 1934, Albert James McKenzie (28), farm labourer, appeared in the City Court before Mr. Maclean, P.M., today. Supporting a police request for a remand, Sergeant Madin said it was alleged that Robinson was shot with a shotgun in his hut in the Wombat Ranges at Tolmie and that his body was placed under a log in the bush, where his skeleton was discovered on September 28. McKenzie was arrested on the murder charge on Wednesday afternoon by Detective-Sergeant O’Keefe, Senior Detective Sloan, Senior Constable Barrett and Detective Garvey. McKenzie was remanded to appear at the City Court on October 14. He did not ask for bail.

ON THIS DAY ……. 30th March 1891

Workmen on the railway to Mansfield, under construction at the time, unearthed a skeleton. No one was quite sure who it was but locals thought it was probably King Alfred, an aboriginal tribal leader who had been elevated to regional status by the early landholders in the area. When Alfred died, he was buried near the spot at Merton where the excavations were being made.

 

 

ON THIS DAY…… 30th August 1898

An enquiry was opened, on the 30th August 1898 at Bendigo into a mystery attached to the finding of the skeleton of a man under an old blue blanket at Five-mile Creek. A patient at Bendigo Hospital said he knew two mates at Five mile Creek. They had a quarrel, and one bolted from the district. He supposes the skeleton must be that of the mate who probably was murdered. The medical evidence of the examination of the skeleton was to the effect that some of the bones of the jaw were missing, and one was indented as with slugs. The enquiry was adjourned until the following day .

 

 

The headless remains of Australia’s most infamous criminal, Ned Kelly, have been identified. Victoria state Attorney General Robert Clark said that a team of forensic scientists identified Kelly’s remains among those exhumed from a mass grave at Pentridge prison in Melbourne in 2009. Kelly led a gang of bank robbers in Victoria in the 19th century. Today he is considered by many Australians to be a Robin Hood-like figure who stood up to the British colonial authorities of the time. He was executed in 1880, but his final resting place had long been a mystery. “To think a group of scientists could identify the body of a man who was executed more than 130 years ago, moved and buried in a haphazard fashion among 33 other prisoners, most of whom are not identified, is amazing,” said Victoria Attorney General Robert Clark. The Sydney Morning Herald reported that investigators revealed that an almost complete skeleton of the outlaw was found buried in a wooden ax box. Clark said DNA analysis and other tests were used to confirm the skeleton is Kelly’s. The Morning Herald said DNA samples were taken from Melbourne school teacher Leigh Olver, who is the great-grandson of Kelly’s sister Ellen. Kelly’s skull was stolen from a display case at the Old Melbourne Gaol in 1978. A 2009 claim by a West Australian farmer, Tom Baxter, that he had Kelly’s skull was eventually rejected, but led to the investigation that uncovered his bones. The Morning Herald said that investigators believed that Kelly’s remains were transferred from the Old Melbourne Gaol to the Pentridge prison in 1929, then exhumed with the remains of 33 other people during the investigation in 2009. Baxter had handed the Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine what he said was the stolen skull, which featured the inscription “E. Kelly” on its side — Kelly’s actual first name was Edward. Baxter has not revealed how he got ahold of the skull. Scientists at the institute set out to determine who the skull belonged to, and to identify Kelly’s full remains among the tangle of skeletons exhumed from the Pentridge site. Through CT scans, X-rays, anthropological and historical research and DNA analysis, the team finally identified one skeleton as Kelly’s. Most of its head was missing. Stephen Cordner, the institute’s director, said the DNA left no doubt the skeleton was Kelly’s. Tests on the remains also uncovered evidence of shotgun wounds that matched those Kelly suffered during his criminal rampage. “The wear and tear of the skeleton is a little bit more than would be expected for a 25-year-old today,” Cordner said. “But such was Ned’s life, this is hardly surprising.” As for Baxter’s “E. Kelly” skull? Not Ned’s. The whereabouts of Kelly’s skull remain a mystery, Cordner said. Descendant Olver told reporters in Melbourne that he hoped his notorious ancestor will finally be laid to rest in a place of dignity. “It’s such a great relief to finally have this side of the story resolved,” Olver said. Kelly’s story has been documented in several books and movies, including a film starring Rolling Stones frontman Mick Jagger and another starring late actor Heath Ledger. Kelly’s use of homemade armor to protect himself from police bullets was even given a nod during the 2000 Sydney Olympics, when actors on stilts dressed in similar armor were featured in the opening ceremony. “I think a lot of Australians connect with Ned Kelly and they’re proud of the heritage that has developed as a result of our connection with Ned Kelly and the story of Ned Kelly,” Olver said. “In our family, he was a hero.”

herald Sun

 

On This Day – June 27, 1934

Charged with having murdered Daniel George Robinson, a trapper, on June 27, 1934, Albert James McKenzie (28), farm labourer, appeared in the City Court before Mr. Maclean, P.M., today. Supporting a police request for a remand, Sergeant Madin said it was alleged that Robinson was shot with a shotgun in his hut in the Wombat Ranges at Tolmie and that his body was placed under a log in the bush, where his skeleton was discovered on September 28. McKenzie was arrested on the murder charge on Wednesday afternoon by Detective-Sergeant O’Keefe, Senior Detective Sloan, Senior Constable Barrett and Detective Garvey. McKenzie was remanded to appear at the City Court on October 14. He did not ask for bail.

ON THIS DAY ……. 30th March 1891

Workmen on the railway to Mansfield, under construction at the time, unearthed a skeleton. No one was quite sure who it was but locals thought it was probably King Alfred, an aboriginal tribal leader who had been elevated to regional status by the early landholders in the area. When Alfred died, he was buried near the spot at Merton where the excavations were being made.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – FEBRUARY 28, 1854

The trial of Patrick and Margaret Geary for the murder of a shepherd in 1854, was commenced at the Old Court House, Melbourne. Mr Adamson prosecuted on behalf of the Crown, and Messrs Molesworth and Sirr represented the prisoners respectively. The presiding judge was his Honour Mr Justice Pohlman. Mr Adamson opened the case in a concise address to the jury, in which he explained the circumstances of the crime with which the prisoners were charged, and the evidence which would be called to endeavour to substantiate it. Andrew Murray was the first witness called. He stated: I am a squatter residing at St.Kilda, and had a brother named Hugh Murray. His station was situated on the Corangamite, and was north of mine. Beyond his was Mr Calvert’s station. I knew a man named Thos. Brookhouse, who was a shepherd in the employ of my brother Hugh. I know the prisoner Patrick Geary, who was also employed by my brother as a shepherd. Geary and Brookhouse were both in my brother’s employ in 1854. Geary’s hut was nearest to the home station, and about three quarters of a mile from Brook- house’s. The hut occupied by Geary was 11 or 12 miles from the home station. On the west, Lake Corangamite was about three miles from both huts. The huts are no longer in existence, but I have pointed out the site of them to constable Killen. I remember Brook- house being missing. He had a sheep dog. When Brookhbuse was reported missing, I went with others in search of him, and spent about a fortnight in the search. On the morning that we first set out, I visited Brookhouse’s hut, which then presented the appearance of his having left it with the intention of returning as usual. The breakfast things had not been removed, and the place appeared to be undis- turbed. The dog was about the hut. We followed the dog, thinking that he might lead us to where Brookhouse would be found, but he frequently stopped, and we ultimately gave up the search. My brother and myself, as well as the owners of all the neighbouring stations, lost a large number of sheep that year. On the 31st of August, 1869, constable Killen came to me, and in consequence of what he said to me I ac- companied him to the spot where Brookhouse’s hut had stood. We also went to a man named George Ball, who was engaged in building a stone wall about half a mile distant. He, and a hoy in his employ named Bayliss, took us to the place where the bones of a man had been found, and which a constable took possession of. Brookhouse was a small, natty tidy little man, having thin sharp features and a prominent chin. He was about 50, or perhaps more. John Shayp, a farmer, living near Ondit, about 12 miles from Colac, deposed: I know the two prisoners. In 1854 I was in the em- ploy of Mr John Calvert, as shepherd. I visited Brookhouse’s hut when the search was commenced, and saw a tea cup, and saucer, a basin, a teapot, and, I think, a knife on the table. The hut was swept clean, and every- thing in order, as if he had not been long ab- sent. When we approached the hut the dog ran away, I think in the direction of south. Brookhouse, I should say, was forty-eight or fifty years of age. He was about as old as I am now. I left home when I was twenty-four years of age, and have been in this country thirty-two years. I am 6ft 8in in height, and he was within an inch lower. We often com- pared our height, and I told him he would never do for a soldier. (A laugh.) He used to wear a blue serge shirt outside, and a black red- striped silk handkerchief. His hat was usually a sou’-wester. The clasp-knife produced is like one he used to have slung to his pocket. He used also to carry a similar knife. The piece of striped cotton produced is like the inside shirt he used to wear. The piece of neckerchief produced is similar, I believe, to the one he used to wear. I can observe the stripe. The bit of hat shown me appears to be a bit of a sou’-wester. At Colac I saw the skeleton found, with the boots on, and at once recognised the remains as those of Brookhouse. The boots on the bones produced I have not the slightest doubt were worn by Brookhouse. He used to have the lace-holes very close to each other. In 1854, a stranger would not pass my hut perhaps for two months. Two other witnesses were examined, and the case was not concluded when the court rose.

Patrick Geary, Margaret Geary, Old Court House, Melbourne, Molesworth, Mr Justice Pohlman, Mr Adamson, Andrew Murray, St.Kilda, Hugh Murray, Calvert’s station, Patrick Geary, Lake Corangamite, constable Killen, shot, murder, George Ball, Bayliss, John Shayp, Ondit, John Calvert, shepherd, Colac, skeleton, Brookhouse

 

On this day …….. 25th of January 1949

Farmers who uncovered a human skeleton at Bannockburn, near Geelong, on this day in 1949, may have solved the mystery of John Lang, farmer labourer, who disappeared in the district nearly 50 years ago. Lang, after his disappearance, became the centre of several legends in the Moorabool Valley district, round Bannockburn. After his wife died about 20 years ago, their cottage fell into ruin and some local, residents swore it was haunted by Lang’s ghost. Mrs Lang refused to believe her husband was dead and kept a light burning in the cottage window to light, his way home. At the time of his disappearance it was believed Lang had been murdered and buried, or that he had fallen into a creek and been drowned. The skeleton was found today, buried under heavy stone and rubble, while a farmer was digging out a rabbit warren. The bones were sent to the Government Pathologist for report.

 

 

ON THIS DAY…… 30th August 1898

An enquiry was opened, on the 30th August 1898 at Bendigo into a mystery attached to the finding of the skeleton of a man under an old blue blanket at Five-mile Creek. A patient at Bendigo Hospital said he knew two mates at Five mile Creek. They had a quarrel, and one bolted from the district. He supposes the skeleton must be that of the mate who probably was murdered. The medical evidence of the examination of the skeleton was to the effect that some of the bones of the jaw were missing, and one was indented as with slugs. The enquiry was adjourned until the following day .

 

 

The headless remains of Australia’s most infamous criminal, Ned Kelly, have been identified. Victoria state Attorney General Robert Clark said that a team of forensic scientists identified Kelly’s remains among those exhumed from a mass grave at Pentridge prison in Melbourne in 2009. Kelly led a gang of bank robbers in Victoria in the 19th century. Today he is considered by many Australians to be a Robin Hood-like figure who stood up to the British colonial authorities of the time. He was executed in 1880, but his final resting place had long been a mystery. “To think a group of scientists could identify the body of a man who was executed more than 130 years ago, moved and buried in a haphazard fashion among 33 other prisoners, most of whom are not identified, is amazing,” said Victoria Attorney General Robert Clark. The Sydney Morning Herald reported that investigators revealed that an almost complete skeleton of the outlaw was found buried in a wooden ax box. Clark said DNA analysis and other tests were used to confirm the skeleton is Kelly’s. The Morning Herald said DNA samples were taken from Melbourne school teacher Leigh Olver, who is the great-grandson of Kelly’s sister Ellen. Kelly’s skull was stolen from a display case at the Old Melbourne Gaol in 1978. A 2009 claim by a West Australian farmer, Tom Baxter, that he had Kelly’s skull was eventually rejected, but led to the investigation that uncovered his bones. The Morning Herald said that investigators believed that Kelly’s remains were transferred from the Old Melbourne Gaol to the Pentridge prison in 1929, then exhumed with the remains of 33 other people during the investigation in 2009. Baxter had handed the Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine what he said was the stolen skull, which featured the inscription “E. Kelly” on its side — Kelly’s actual first name was Edward. Baxter has not revealed how he got ahold of the skull. Scientists at the institute set out to determine who the skull belonged to, and to identify Kelly’s full remains among the tangle of skeletons exhumed from the Pentridge site. Through CT scans, X-rays, anthropological and historical research and DNA analysis, the team finally identified one skeleton as Kelly’s. Most of its head was missing. Stephen Cordner, the institute’s director, said the DNA left no doubt the skeleton was Kelly’s. Tests on the remains also uncovered evidence of shotgun wounds that matched those Kelly suffered during his criminal rampage. “The wear and tear of the skeleton is a little bit more than would be expected for a 25-year-old today,” Cordner said. “But such was Ned’s life, this is hardly surprising.” As for Baxter’s “E. Kelly” skull? Not Ned’s. The whereabouts of Kelly’s skull remain a mystery, Cordner said. Descendant Olver told reporters in Melbourne that he hoped his notorious ancestor will finally be laid to rest in a place of dignity. “It’s such a great relief to finally have this side of the story resolved,” Olver said. Kelly’s story has been documented in several books and movies, including a film starring Rolling Stones frontman Mick Jagger and another starring late actor Heath Ledger. Kelly’s use of homemade armor to protect himself from police bullets was even given a nod during the 2000 Sydney Olympics, when actors on stilts dressed in similar armor were featured in the opening ceremony. “I think a lot of Australians connect with Ned Kelly and they’re proud of the heritage that has developed as a result of our connection with Ned Kelly and the story of Ned Kelly,” Olver said. “In our family, he was a hero.”

herald Sun

 

On This Day – June 27, 1934

Charged with having murdered Daniel George Robinson, a trapper, on June 27, 1934, Albert James McKenzie (28), farm labourer, appeared in the City Court before Mr. Maclean, P.M., today. Supporting a police request for a remand, Sergeant Madin said it was alleged that Robinson was shot with a shotgun in his hut in the Wombat Ranges at Tolmie and that his body was placed under a log in the bush, where his skeleton was discovered on September 28. McKenzie was arrested on the murder charge on Wednesday afternoon by Detective-Sergeant O’Keefe, Senior Detective Sloan, Senior Constable Barrett and Detective Garvey. McKenzie was remanded to appear at the City Court on October 14. He did not ask for bail.