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ON THIS DAY – July 14, 1942

Search for Soldier

Detectives have searched without avail for an Australian soldier who was seen in a Fitzroy hotel with Miss Mary Agnes Earls, 42, invalid pensioner, and for a woman who was in her company a few hours before her death on July 14. It has not been ascertained whether the soldier was a casual acquaintance or a friend of Miss Earls. Detectives are anxious to clear up the direction in which Miss Earls went when they separated. The soldier it is thought could give this and other important information It has been established that from 4 40pm until about 6pm on the day before her death Miss Earls was near the vacant allotment adjoining St Vincent’s Hospital, where her body was found. Questions to which police are seeking answers are Where did Miss Earls go after meeting the soldier outside the hotel on the corner of Brunswick and Gertrude sts? Did she meet her death in a house near by, and was her body then carried to where It was found? Did she go to the vacant allotment voluntarily, and was she killed and concealed under cover of darkness? Why did the murderer strip and scratch the body, and how was the clothing disposed of? Motive for the crime is also puzzling police. Does the absence of her handbag suggest robbery? Was the crime one of vengeance or rage?

ON THIS DAY – June 17, 1917

SHIELDING A MURDERER

Declaring there was a conspiracy of silence, Dr. R.H. Cole, City Coronoer, yesterday adjourned an inquiry into the death of Charles Edward Cleary, who was admitted to St. Vincents’s Hospital on June 3rd with a revolver bullet in his head and died on June 17th.  Dr. Cole said material witnesses were missing.  Harry and Ray Dunn should have been present, also the man Cutmore.  The inquiry would be adjourned until Thursday week to allow of their being called.

Continuing, Dr Cole said: -“Apparently the witness Johnson knows all about it.  He certainly knows a great deal more than he has said in the witness box.  The evidence of independent witnesses points to the fact that he was there when the shot was fired.  Johnson knows all about it.  I do not think he is shielding himself as much as other people.  He has adopted the same attitude as that of Cleary.  It is a conspiracy of silence; even the relatives are not anxious to have the matter disclosed.  It is very evident that Johnson is shielding someone.”

On this day …….. 21st of April 1934

Chance has played many curious tricks, but never before one such as was played at about 10 o’clock last night, with Madame Prince and her monkey Tarzan the principals in an amazing episode at Wirth’s Circus. Towards the end of their act Tarzan, the monkey shoots, from a distance of 15 feet at a balloon attached to a steel target. Last night the animal’s mistress arranged the pea-rifle, which was loaded with a .22 short cartridge, and the patrons waited expectantly for the report. It came, but according to the police, the bullet completely missed the target and bored its way through a one-Inch plank, then through the canvas tent, to lodge in the back of Charles Alfred Broomhall, 23, of Albion-street, Sydney, an employee of Wirth’s Circus. Luckily, the velocity of the flying pellet had considerably decreased when it struck Broomhall, and the only in jury sustained was a flesh wound. Broomhall was treated at St. Vincent’s Hospital and allowed to leave. He was X-rayed, for the purpose of locating the pellet.

 

ON THIS DAY …. 8th April 1912

COLLINGWOOD

Police investigated the death of William Hughes Parker. The tragedy was complicated by the temporary disappearance of Frederick John Parker, an elder brother of the dead man. On this day in 1912, a tall young man, dressed in a blue sac suit and a blue sweater, walked into the Detective Office and informed Detective Johnson that he was Frederick Parker. He had read an account of the death of his brother, and until that time was unaware that his brother had died. He had stayed the night at a restaurant in the city. Detective Johnson detained him until the arrival of Detective Bear, who has charge of the investigation. Parker declined to make any statement. Frederick Parker has a recent cut on his upper lip, the wound was stitched at St. Vincents Hospital, Parker was locked up by Detective Bear and Constable Brown in the city watch house on the charge of the wilful murder of his brother. Before Frederick Parker was locked up the coat he was wearing when he called at the Detective Office was taken possession of by Detective Bear, and another one was supplied to him.

 

ON THIS DAY – October 27, 1927

Hailing a taxi-cab in Lonsdale Street at 5 o’clock on October 27, 1927, Squizzy Taylor, accompanied by two men, ordered the driver, John Hall, to go to Carlton. When he hailed the cab Taylor gave no indication of his destination beyond saying that he wished to visit a hotel in Carlton. Calls were made to several hotels in the vicinity of Rathdowne, Lygon, and Elgin streets. The movements of the men indicated that they were in search of another person or persons. Their conversation, however, gave no clue as to whom they were seeking. Eventually Taylor told the driver to go to Barkly Street. Turning from Rathdowne Street the cab had only travelled a few yards in a northerly direction along Barkly street, when the driver was told to stop. Taylor, accompanied by one of his friends left the cab, and walking some distance along the northern side of the street went into one of a terrace of houses.

The house belonged to Bridget Cutmore, mother of Snowy Cutmore.  Cutmore’s bedroom would be the scene of the final shootout with Snowy dying in his bed and Squizzy dying in St Vincents Hospital a few hours later.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – July 14, 1942

Search for Soldier

Detectives have searched without avail for an Australian soldier who was seen in a Fitzroy hotel with Miss Mary Agnes Earls, 42, invalid pensioner, and for a woman who was in her company a few hours before her death on July 14. It has not been ascertained whether the soldier was a casual acquaintance or a friend of Miss Earls. Detectives are anxious to clear up the direction in which Miss Earls went when they separated. The soldier it is thought could give this and other important information It has been established that from 4 40pm until about 6pm on the day before her death Miss Earls was near the vacant allotment adjoining St Vincent’s Hospital, where her body was found. Questions to which police are seeking answers are Where did Miss Earls go after meeting the soldier outside the hotel on the corner of Brunswick and Gertrude sts? Did she meet her death in a house near by, and was her body then carried to where It was found? Did she go to the vacant allotment voluntarily, and was she killed and concealed under cover of darkness? Why did the murderer strip and scratch the body, and how was the clothing disposed of? Motive for the crime is also puzzling police. Does the absence of her handbag suggest robbery? Was the crime one of vengeance or rage?

ON THIS DAY – June 17, 1917

SHIELDING A MURDERER

Declaring there was a conspiracy of silence, Dr. R.H. Cole, City Coronoer, yesterday adjourned an inquiry into the death of Charles Edward Cleary, who was admitted to St. Vincents’s Hospital on June 3rd with a revolver bullet in his head and died on June 17th.  Dr. Cole said material witnesses were missing.  Harry and Ray Dunn should have been present, also the man Cutmore.  The inquiry would be adjourned until Thursday week to allow of their being called.

Continuing, Dr Cole said: -“Apparently the witness Johnson knows all about it.  He certainly knows a great deal more than he has said in the witness box.  The evidence of independent witnesses points to the fact that he was there when the shot was fired.  Johnson knows all about it.  I do not think he is shielding himself as much as other people.  He has adopted the same attitude as that of Cleary.  It is a conspiracy of silence; even the relatives are not anxious to have the matter disclosed.  It is very evident that Johnson is shielding someone.”

On this day …….. 21st of April 1934

Chance has played many curious tricks, but never before one such as was played at about 10 o’clock last night, with Madame Prince and her monkey Tarzan the principals in an amazing episode at Wirth’s Circus. Towards the end of their act Tarzan, the monkey shoots, from a distance of 15 feet at a balloon attached to a steel target. Last night the animal’s mistress arranged the pea-rifle, which was loaded with a .22 short cartridge, and the patrons waited expectantly for the report. It came, but according to the police, the bullet completely missed the target and bored its way through a one-Inch plank, then through the canvas tent, to lodge in the back of Charles Alfred Broomhall, 23, of Albion-street, Sydney, an employee of Wirth’s Circus. Luckily, the velocity of the flying pellet had considerably decreased when it struck Broomhall, and the only in jury sustained was a flesh wound. Broomhall was treated at St. Vincent’s Hospital and allowed to leave. He was X-rayed, for the purpose of locating the pellet.

 

On This Day – April 16, 1947

As a Sequel to the shooting In the Treasury Gardens on April 16, when a woman was fatally injured, a 50-year-old widower, Henry Jenkins, of Bond street, Ivanhoe, was charged at the City Watchhouse with the murder of Ruth Grant (38), of Cooma Street, Preston. Jenkins had been in St. Vincent’s Hospital suffering from gunshot wounds in tho groin since the night of the shooting. He was discharged from hospital this afternoon and taken direct to the watchhouse. Ruth Grant died in St. Vincent’s Hospital five days after she was admitted with gunshot wounds in the abdomen.

ON THIS DAY …. 8th April 1912

COLLINGWOOD

Police investigated the death of William Hughes Parker. The tragedy was complicated by the temporary disappearance of Frederick John Parker, an elder brother of the dead man. On this day in 1912, a tall young man, dressed in a blue sac suit and a blue sweater, walked into the Detective Office and informed Detective Johnson that he was Frederick Parker. He had read an account of the death of his brother, and until that time was unaware that his brother had died. He had stayed the night at a restaurant in the city. Detective Johnson detained him until the arrival of Detective Bear, who has charge of the investigation. Parker declined to make any statement. Frederick Parker has a recent cut on his upper lip, the wound was stitched at St. Vincents Hospital, Parker was locked up by Detective Bear and Constable Brown in the city watch house on the charge of the wilful murder of his brother. Before Frederick Parker was locked up the coat he was wearing when he called at the Detective Office was taken possession of by Detective Bear, and another one was supplied to him.

 

On this day ………… 24th February 1984

In Australia, the first heart transplant occurred under the direction of Dr Harry Windsor. The patient died within just a few days after his body rejected the new organ. The era of successful heart transplants in Australia can be attributed largely to the influence of Dr Victor Chang. Victor Peter Chang Yam Him was born in Shanghai, China, on 21 November 1936. Chang’s mother died of cancer when he was just twelve years old, and this was a deciding factor in his choice to become a doctor. He came to Australia to complete his secondary schooling in 1953, then studied medicine at the University of Sydney, graduating with a Bachelor of Medical Science with first class honours in 1960, and a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery in 1962. After further study in England, and becoming a Fellow of both the Royal College of Surgeons and American College of Surgeons, he joined the cardiothoracic team at St Vincent’s Hospital in 1972. Chang was instrumental in raising funds to establish a heart transplant programme at St Vincent’s. The first successful transplant under the programme was performed on a 39 year old shearer from Armidale on 24 February 1984, who survived several months longer than he would have otherwise. Arguably, Chang’s best-known success was when he operated on Fiona Coote, a 14-year-old schoolgirl, on 7-8 April 1984. Over the next six years, the unit at St Vincent’s performed over 197 heart transplants and 14 heart-lung transplants, achieving a 90% success rate for recipients in the first year. To compensate for the lack of heart donors, Chang developed an artificial heart valve and also worked on designing an artificial heart. Victor Chang was murdered on 4 July 1991, after an extortion attempt on his family. The murder was related to transplant waiting lists. Within less than two weeks, Chiew Seng Liew was charged with the murder, and Jimmy Tan was charged as an accessory. The Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute, to enable research into the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of heart muscle diseases, was launched in honour of Victor Chang on 15 February 1994.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – February 18, 1919

A most determined attempt was made on the life of Edward Whiting, an ex pugilist, in the early hours on this day in 1919. No fewer than six revolver bullets were found embedded in his head when he was examined at St Vincent’s Hospital, and only the possession of an exceptionally thick skull saved his life. Whiting refuses to give information to the police regarding the identity of his assailants. He merely states that four or five men were concerned in the affair. He was fired at when lying in bed. A few years earlier a similar attempt was made on his life.