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ON THIS DAY…….2nd August 1924

The inquest into the death of Irene Tuckerman, who was found murdered at Caulfield on this day in 1924, was opened on September 17. Mr. Elsbury, for the Crown, said that suspicion rested in two-quarters, but it had been deemed advisable simply to bring the suspected persons before the Court, as witnesses, and to leave further action, to the coroner. Mr. W. S. Doris appeared for Thomas Cheshire, newsagent, of 200 Balaclava road, Caulfield, and Sir. Scott Murphy and Mr. Healy for the relatives of Irene Tuckerman, and for William Robinson, a boarder at the home of the child.  Mrs. Tuckerman, after having given evidence of the child’s disappearance, in cross examination by Mr. Elsbury, said that Irene had sold papers in Cheshire’s shop without her knowledge. She would not have allowed this had she known. The relations between her eldest son, Harold, and Irene were affectionate.  Robert Harold Tuckerman, baker, accounted for his movements on August 2. He denied that he had sent his sister to Cheshire’s shop. He had no quarrel with his sister, and denied that he had a bad temper.  William Robinson, gas-worker, was questioned by Mr. Klsbury as follows:— Between a quarter and half-past 11 o’clock on the night of August 2 did Irene Tuckerman not walk into the house?—Certainly not. I did not see her from the previous night.  I suggest that she entered by the back door before half-past 11 o’clock?—She did not. That she took her coat off?—She did not come home to take it off.  Have you ever heard Ivy Tuckerman say anything about Cheshire?—No. About the man in the paper-shop?—Yes, I have heard them say about getting papers there. Has Ivy ever said anything about the man in the paper shop?—I could not — I think she has- She has made a suggestion that when she went into his shop he closed the door and complained of draught. She got a bit frightened. What did he do to them?—I could not say. Oh, come on, sir, I have a statement here over your signature. The Coroner (addressing Robinson).— You are not impressing me at all. If you prevaricate again I will send you to gaol. I feel inclined to commit you for contempt of Court. Mr. Elsbury.—Did you make any statement to Detective O’Keefe as to what Ivy had told you regarding the man in the paper shop ? Witness.—Not that I remember. Did you say this: “I have not heard Irene Tuckerman complain about strange men speaking to her. I heard Ivy say that the man in the paper shop is a nasty man, that he would tickle them under the chin, and squeeze their hands, and would be unduly familiar with the young girls”?—That is what they told me John Francis O’Callaghan, tramway gripman, and Edmund Charles Phillips, tramway conductor, stated that on August 2, about half-past 1 o’clock, they saw Cheshire on a tram in Wellington street, St. Kilda with a girl dressed similarly to Irene Tuckerman. The couple alighted from the tram on the St. Kilda Esplanade and walked toward the beach. Detectives Piggott and Ethel detailed conversations with Cheshire, in which, they stated, Cheshire maintained his innocence of any part in the death of Irene Tuckerman. After interviews with a man, a woman, and a youth, they were satisfied that there was no ground for further action against those persons. Cheshire said that he was at his shop throughout August 2, though he closed it from half past 1 o’clock to half-past 4 o’clock. He closed at half-past 8 o’clock and slept at the shop that night. He rose at 9 o’clock on August 3, and went to his son’s place at Surrey Hills. The Tuckerman girls visited his shop occasionally to buy papers. He denied that he was on a tram with Irene Tuckerman on August 2. Cheshire was invited to give evidence but at the instance of his counsel he declined. The coroner committed Cheshire for trial on a charge of the murder of Irene Tuckerman.

 

On This Day – June 25, 1886

The inquest on the body of Mary Taylor, found dead in her house in Kenny street, Richmond, early on Saturday morning, was held yesterday at the Vine Hotel, Richmond.

Thomas Taylor, the husband of the deceased, being present in custody. Denis Hogan,a lodger with the Taylors, stated that the deceased had been drinking on Friday, and that he and Taylor, on going home late on Friday night, found her lying on the floor of the kitchen.  During the night he heard no noises, but Taylor called him in the morning at about 4 o’clock, and told him that his wife was dead, and that he (Taylor) must have killed her.

Taylor made a statement to Senior constable Couche, in which he stated that he struck his wife and kicked her down. The evidence of Professor Allen, who made the post mortem examination of the body, showed that the injuries must have been the results of continued violence On one side 10 ribs were fractured ,on the other side two ribs were
similarly damaged The chest bone was crushed in, and the hyoid bone was fractured in two places The head, trunk, and limbs were covered with cuts and bruises, the back especially being a mass of bruises from the neck downward.

The injuries, in the opinion of the medical experts, were the results of continued blows and kicks, while the more
serious were caused by someone having violently knelt or jumped upon the deceased. There was also compression or the larynx as though throttling had been attempted.

This injury, in the opinion of Professor Allen,was inflicted at a time when the woman was almost dead from other injuries, several of which taken separately were sufficient to have caused death either as the result of shock or from hemorrhage of blood into the chest. The coroner pointed out that in the face of this evidence, there was no room for
the supposition that the wounds were inflicted as mere chastisement, or with any other intent than that of killing.

The jury after being locked up for four hours, found Thomas Taylor guilty of the wilful murder of his wife.

On This Day – November 12, 1938

DOUBLE MURDER CHARGE

On a charge of having murdered Annie Constance Wiseman, 62, and her niece, Phyllis Wiseman,  17, at Glenroy, on November 12, George Green, 42, chimney sweep, of West Heidelberg was remanded at the City Court to-day until December 16. Miss Wiseman and her niece were found strangled in Miss Wiseman’s home at Glenroy on November 12. The inquest into their deaths will be held on December 19.

ON THIS DAY…….2nd August 1924

The inquest into the death of Irene Tuckerman, who was found murdered at Caulfield on this day in 1924, was opened on September 17. Mr. Elsbury, for the Crown, said that suspicion rested in two-quarters, but it had been deemed advisable simply to bring the suspected persons before the Court, as witnesses, and to leave further action, to the coroner. Mr. W. S. Doris appeared for Thomas Cheshire, newsagent, of 200 Balaclava road, Caulfield, and Sir. Scott Murphy and Mr. Healy for the relatives of Irene Tuckerman, and for William Robinson, a boarder at the home of the child.  Mrs. Tuckerman, after having given evidence of the child’s disappearance, in cross examination by Mr. Elsbury, said that Irene had sold papers in Cheshire’s shop without her knowledge. She would not have allowed this had she known. The relations between her eldest son, Harold, and Irene were affectionate.  Robert Harold Tuckerman, baker, accounted for his movements on August 2. He denied that he had sent his sister to Cheshire’s shop. He had no quarrel with his sister, and denied that he had a bad temper.  William Robinson, gas-worker, was questioned by Mr. Klsbury as follows:— Between a quarter and half-past 11 o’clock on the night of August 2 did Irene Tuckerman not walk into the house?—Certainly not. I did not see her from the previous night.  I suggest that she entered by the back door before half-past 11 o’clock?—She did not. That she took her coat off?—She did not come home to take it off.  Have you ever heard Ivy Tuckerman say anything about Cheshire?—No. About the man in the paper-shop?—Yes, I have heard them say about getting papers there. Has Ivy ever said anything about the man in the paper shop?—I could not — I think she has- She has made a suggestion that when she went into his shop he closed the door and complained of draught. She got a bit frightened. What did he do to them?—I could not say. Oh, come on, sir, I have a statement here over your signature. The Coroner (addressing Robinson).— You are not impressing me at all. If you prevaricate again I will send you to gaol. I feel inclined to commit you for contempt of Court. Mr. Elsbury.—Did you make any statement to Detective O’Keefe as to what Ivy had told you regarding the man in the paper shop ? Witness.—Not that I remember. Did you say this: “I have not heard Irene Tuckerman complain about strange men speaking to her. I heard Ivy say that the man in the paper shop is a nasty man, that he would tickle them under the chin, and squeeze their hands, and would be unduly familiar with the young girls”?—That is what they told me John Francis O’Callaghan, tramway gripman, and Edmund Charles Phillips, tramway conductor, stated that on August 2, about half-past 1 o’clock, they saw Cheshire on a tram in Wellington street, St. Kilda with a girl dressed similarly to Irene Tuckerman. The couple alighted from the tram on the St. Kilda Esplanade and walked toward the beach. Detectives Piggott and Ethel detailed conversations with Cheshire, in which, they stated, Cheshire maintained his innocence of any part in the death of Irene Tuckerman. After interviews with a man, a woman, and a youth, they were satisfied that there was no ground for further action against those persons. Cheshire said that he was at his shop throughout August 2, though he closed it from half past 1 o’clock to half-past 4 o’clock. He closed at half-past 8 o’clock and slept at the shop that night. He rose at 9 o’clock on August 3, and went to his son’s place at Surrey Hills. The Tuckerman girls visited his shop occasionally to buy papers. He denied that he was on a tram with Irene Tuckerman on August 2. Cheshire was invited to give evidence but at the instance of his counsel he declined. The coroner committed Cheshire for trial on a charge of the murder of Irene Tuckerman.

 

On This Day – June 25, 1886

The inquest on the body of Mary Taylor, found dead in her house in Kenny street, Richmond, early on Saturday morning, was held yesterday at the Vine Hotel, Richmond.

Thomas Taylor, the husband of the deceased, being present in custody. Denis Hogan,a lodger with the Taylors, stated that the deceased had been drinking on Friday, and that he and Taylor, on going home late on Friday night, found her lying on the floor of the kitchen.  During the night he heard no noises, but Taylor called him in the morning at about 4 o’clock, and told him that his wife was dead, and that he (Taylor) must have killed her.

Taylor made a statement to Senior constable Couche, in which he stated that he struck his wife and kicked her down. The evidence of Professor Allen, who made the post mortem examination of the body, showed that the injuries must have been the results of continued violence On one side 10 ribs were fractured ,on the other side two ribs were
similarly damaged The chest bone was crushed in, and the hyoid bone was fractured in two places The head, trunk, and limbs were covered with cuts and bruises, the back especially being a mass of bruises from the neck downward.

The injuries, in the opinion of the medical experts, were the results of continued blows and kicks, while the more
serious were caused by someone having violently knelt or jumped upon the deceased. There was also compression or the larynx as though throttling had been attempted.

This injury, in the opinion of Professor Allen,was inflicted at a time when the woman was almost dead from other injuries, several of which taken separately were sufficient to have caused death either as the result of shock or from hemorrhage of blood into the chest. The coroner pointed out that in the face of this evidence, there was no room for
the supposition that the wounds were inflicted as mere chastisement, or with any other intent than that of killing.

The jury after being locked up for four hours, found Thomas Taylor guilty of the wilful murder of his wife.

On This Day – April 1, 1938

Verdict of Murder.

At the Inquest, conducted by the deputy coroner (Mr, G. Moore) to-day, concerning the death of a newly born male child, whose body was found on the property of Devonshire Sands Ltd., at Long Gully on April 1, police evidence revealed that a piece of elastic was tied round the neck of the baby. A post mortem examination conducted by Dr. M. Jacobs showed that the child had been strangled. Efforts by the police to establish the identity of the child and to find who placed it at the spot where it was discovered had been fruitless. The coroner recorded a finding of murder against some person or persons unknown.

05ON THIS DAY – March 5, 1950

FITZROY

Stanley Henry Shaw, at Fitzroy, was arrested and charged with murder of a woman more than 14 months earlier. She was Sylvia Holmes, 22, who was strangled in the bedroom of a house in Cremorne St., Fitzroy, on March 5.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – December 25, 2008

Point Leo Road, Merricks

The body of Mavroidis “Blacky” Karpetis aged 78, was found in grassland at Point Leo Road, Merricks, on Christmas Day 2008. He had been choked. He was last seen two days earlier in Tootgarook, 20km away. An inquest in 2012 was told men were heard shouting around 4.30am on December 24, near where Mr Karpetis’s body was found. In 2009 his wallet was found by a Tuerong farmer. He was last seen going for a walk after a family argument. This is still an unsolved murder.

 

On This Day – November 12, 1938

DOUBLE MURDER CHARGE

On a charge of having murdered Annie Constance Wiseman, 62, and her niece, Phyllis Wiseman,  17, at Glenroy, on November 12, George Green, 42, chimney sweep, of West Heidelberg was remanded at the City Court to-day until December 16. Miss Wiseman and her niece were found strangled in Miss Wiseman’s home at Glenroy on November 12. The inquest into their deaths will be held on December 19.

ON THIS DAY …….18th August 2003

Mark Mallia would die a painful death in a garage at a property in Lalor at the hands of a number of well known gangland figures including Benji Veniamin.  It was alleged that Carl Williams ordered that Mallia be interrogated and tortured as he believed that Mallia had hidden drug money from him.  Mallia would be tortured with a soldering iron at the hands of 5 men before being strangled.  His body would be found later the same day, badly burned in a melted wheelie bin about 8pm that night in a stormwater drain near a soccer club in West Sunshine.  The autopsy showed Mallia had died of neck compression.

 

ON THIS DAY…….2nd August 1924

The inquest into the death of Irene Tuckerman, who was found murdered at Caulfield on this day in 1924, was opened on September 17. Mr. Elsbury, for the Crown, said that suspicion rested in two-quarters, but it had been deemed advisable simply to bring the suspected persons before the Court, as witnesses, and to leave further action, to the coroner. Mr. W. S. Doris appeared for Thomas Cheshire, newsagent, of 200 Balaclava road, Caulfield, and Sir. Scott Murphy and Mr. Healy for the relatives of Irene Tuckerman, and for William Robinson, a boarder at the home of the child.  Mrs. Tuckerman, after having given evidence of the child’s disappearance, in cross examination by Mr. Elsbury, said that Irene had sold papers in Cheshire’s shop without her knowledge. She would not have allowed this had she known. The relations between her eldest son, Harold, and Irene were affectionate.  Robert Harold Tuckerman, baker, accounted for his movements on August 2. He denied that he had sent his sister to Cheshire’s shop. He had no quarrel with his sister, and denied that he had a bad temper.  William Robinson, gas-worker, was questioned by Mr. Klsbury as follows:— Between a quarter and half-past 11 o’clock on the night of August 2 did Irene Tuckerman not walk into the house?—Certainly not. I did not see her from the previous night.  I suggest that she entered by the back door before half-past 11 o’clock?—She did not. That she took her coat off?—She did not come home to take it off.  Have you ever heard Ivy Tuckerman say anything about Cheshire?—No. About the man in the paper-shop?—Yes, I have heard them say about getting papers there. Has Ivy ever said anything about the man in the paper shop?—I could not — I think she has- She has made a suggestion that when she went into his shop he closed the door and complained of draught. She got a bit frightened. What did he do to them?—I could not say. Oh, come on, sir, I have a statement here over your signature. The Coroner (addressing Robinson).— You are not impressing me at all. If you prevaricate again I will send you to gaol. I feel inclined to commit you for contempt of Court. Mr. Elsbury.—Did you make any statement to Detective O’Keefe as to what Ivy had told you regarding the man in the paper shop ? Witness.—Not that I remember. Did you say this: “I have not heard Irene Tuckerman complain about strange men speaking to her. I heard Ivy say that the man in the paper shop is a nasty man, that he would tickle them under the chin, and squeeze their hands, and would be unduly familiar with the young girls”?—That is what they told me John Francis O’Callaghan, tramway gripman, and Edmund Charles Phillips, tramway conductor, stated that on August 2, about half-past 1 o’clock, they saw Cheshire on a tram in Wellington street, St. Kilda with a girl dressed similarly to Irene Tuckerman. The couple alighted from the tram on the St. Kilda Esplanade and walked toward the beach. Detectives Piggott and Ethel detailed conversations with Cheshire, in which, they stated, Cheshire maintained his innocence of any part in the death of Irene Tuckerman. After interviews with a man, a woman, and a youth, they were satisfied that there was no ground for further action against those persons. Cheshire said that he was at his shop throughout August 2, though he closed it from half past 1 o’clock to half-past 4 o’clock. He closed at half-past 8 o’clock and slept at the shop that night. He rose at 9 o’clock on August 3, and went to his son’s place at Surrey Hills. The Tuckerman girls visited his shop occasionally to buy papers. He denied that he was on a tram with Irene Tuckerman on August 2. Cheshire was invited to give evidence but at the instance of his counsel he declined. The coroner committed Cheshire for trial on a charge of the murder of Irene Tuckerman.

 

On This Day – June 25, 1886

The inquest on the body of Mary Taylor, found dead in her house in Kenny street, Richmond, early on Saturday morning, was held yesterday at the Vine Hotel, Richmond.

Thomas Taylor, the husband of the deceased, being present in custody. Denis Hogan,a lodger with the Taylors, stated that the deceased had been drinking on Friday, and that he and Taylor, on going home late on Friday night, found her lying on the floor of the kitchen.  During the night he heard no noises, but Taylor called him in the morning at about 4 o’clock, and told him that his wife was dead, and that he (Taylor) must have killed her.

Taylor made a statement to Senior constable Couche, in which he stated that he struck his wife and kicked her down. The evidence of Professor Allen, who made the post mortem examination of the body, showed that the injuries must have been the results of continued violence On one side 10 ribs were fractured ,on the other side two ribs were
similarly damaged The chest bone was crushed in, and the hyoid bone was fractured in two places The head, trunk, and limbs were covered with cuts and bruises, the back especially being a mass of bruises from the neck downward.

The injuries, in the opinion of the medical experts, were the results of continued blows and kicks, while the more
serious were caused by someone having violently knelt or jumped upon the deceased. There was also compression or the larynx as though throttling had been attempted.

This injury, in the opinion of Professor Allen,was inflicted at a time when the woman was almost dead from other injuries, several of which taken separately were sufficient to have caused death either as the result of shock or from hemorrhage of blood into the chest. The coroner pointed out that in the face of this evidence, there was no room for
the supposition that the wounds were inflicted as mere chastisement, or with any other intent than that of killing.

The jury after being locked up for four hours, found Thomas Taylor guilty of the wilful murder of his wife.