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ON THIS DAY – April 19, 1914

MELBOURNE

MOTORIST KILLS A TELEGRAPHIST BUT ESCAPES MANSLAUGHTER

The trial of Betro Callil, warehouse man, on the charge of manslaughter of Rose Despard, telegraphist, was concluded in the Criminal Court to-day. On April 19, deceased was knocked down and fatally injured by a motor car driven by Callil at the intersection of Swanston and Flinders streets. The defence was that the car was travelling at about 10 to 12 miles per hour, and that defendant could not avoid the collision. After the evidence for the prosecution was given, Mr. Justice Hodges said he was unable to see any evidence of negligence, and the jury, by direction, returned a verdict of ”Not guilty.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – March 31, 1918

MELBOURNE

At an inquiry regarding the death of Albert Greaves (28) in the Melbourne Hospital on March 31 as the result of injuries to his head, the Coroner committed James Gibson for trial on a charge of manslaughter. It is alleged that in the course of an altercation in Swanston-street Gibson struck Greaves. Police constables gave evidence to the effect that Gibson resisted violently when he was arrested.

 

On this day …….. 12th of August 1930

While toast was being made in the kitchen of the Britannia Hotel, in Swanston street, Melbourne on the morning of August 12th, 1930, by Ellen Alice Rodgers, her clothing caught fire. Miss Rodgers, a waitress, aged 24 years, of Carnarvon street, Brunswick, died from burns and shock at the Melbourne Hospital on August 13. An Inquest was held at the Morgue by the city coroner (Mr D. Grant).
A finding of accidental death was returned.

 

ON THIS DAY….. 27th May 1922

After hearing evidence at the inquest on the body of Eugene Patrick Walsh, who died in tho Melbourne Hospital on May 27, the coroner (Dr. Cole) committed Percy Draper, aged 28 years, labourer, of Albion street, West Brunswick, for trial at Melbourne on June 15, on a charge of manslaughter. Senior-detective Clugston conducted the case for the police, and Mr. Sonenberg appeared for Draper. The death of Walsh followed a dispute with Draper in Swanston street on the night of May 20. When Draper was arrested he was charged with having unlawfully assaulted Walsh, who was in the Melbourne Hospital. Walsh died next morning, and Draper was then charged with murder. Dr. Mollison, who made the post-mortem examination, deposed that death was due to a fracture 0f tho skull and pressure on the the brain. Mrs. Ethel Davison, living in Rathdowne street, Carlton, gave evidence that she was passing the two men in Swanston street on the night of May 26. She heard one say “I won’t.” Both were drunk. One of them, whom she now knew as Draper, put one hand on the other’s shoulder to hold him up, and then hit him with the other hand. The blow knocked the man’s head back sharply, and he fell against the wall of the Orient Hotel. She said to Draper, “You are a coward to strike a like that,” and he replied, “lt’s all right; he’s not hurt.” Draper then tried to make the other man stand up, but he could not. Detective S. IH. McGuffie said that he saw Draper strike Walsh. When asked why he struck him, Draper replied, “I struck him, and that’s all about it.” At the city watchhouse witness (sic) said to Draper, “I think that man will die.” Draper answered, “I hope not. He is a pal of mine.” Next morning witness said to him, “At half-past 2 o’clock this morning Walsh died from injuries received as a result of the blow you struck him.” Draper put his hands to his face and swooned. He began to sob, and said, “He was my best pal.” The coroner said that drunkenness was no excuse for Draper’s action. It might be a mitigation. It was one of those things upon which the law looked very seriously. Bail was fixed in one surety of £100.

 

ON THIS DAY – April 19, 1914

MELBOURNE

MOTORIST KILLS A TELEGRAPHIST BUT ESCAPES MANSLAUGHTER

The trial of Betro Callil, warehouse man, on the charge of manslaughter of Rose Despard, telegraphist, was concluded in the Criminal Court to-day. On April 19, deceased was knocked down and fatally injured by a motor car driven by Callil at the intersection of Swanston and Flinders streets. The defence was that the car was travelling at about 10 to 12 miles per hour, and that defendant could not avoid the collision. After the evidence for the prosecution was given, Mr. Justice Hodges said he was unable to see any evidence of negligence, and the jury, by direction, returned a verdict of ”Not guilty.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – March 31, 1918

MELBOURNE

At an inquiry regarding the death of Albert Greaves (28) in the Melbourne Hospital on March 31 as the result of injuries to his head, the Coroner committed James Gibson for trial on a charge of manslaughter. It is alleged that in the course of an altercation in Swanston-street Gibson struck Greaves. Police constables gave evidence to the effect that Gibson resisted violently when he was arrested.

 

On this day …….. 12th of August 1930

While toast was being made in the kitchen of the Britannia Hotel, in Swanston street, Melbourne on the morning of August 12th, 1930, by Ellen Alice Rodgers, her clothing caught fire. Miss Rodgers, a waitress, aged 24 years, of Carnarvon street, Brunswick, died from burns and shock at the Melbourne Hospital on August 13. An Inquest was held at the Morgue by the city coroner (Mr D. Grant).
A finding of accidental death was returned.

 

ON THIS DAY….. 27th May 1922

After hearing evidence at the inquest on the body of Eugene Patrick Walsh, who died in tho Melbourne Hospital on May 27, the coroner (Dr. Cole) committed Percy Draper, aged 28 years, labourer, of Albion street, West Brunswick, for trial at Melbourne on June 15, on a charge of manslaughter. Senior-detective Clugston conducted the case for the police, and Mr. Sonenberg appeared for Draper. The death of Walsh followed a dispute with Draper in Swanston street on the night of May 20. When Draper was arrested he was charged with having unlawfully assaulted Walsh, who was in the Melbourne Hospital. Walsh died next morning, and Draper was then charged with murder. Dr. Mollison, who made the post-mortem examination, deposed that death was due to a fracture 0f tho skull and pressure on the the brain. Mrs. Ethel Davison, living in Rathdowne street, Carlton, gave evidence that she was passing the two men in Swanston street on the night of May 26. She heard one say “I won’t.” Both were drunk. One of them, whom she now knew as Draper, put one hand on the other’s shoulder to hold him up, and then hit him with the other hand. The blow knocked the man’s head back sharply, and he fell against the wall of the Orient Hotel. She said to Draper, “You are a coward to strike a like that,” and he replied, “lt’s all right; he’s not hurt.” Draper then tried to make the other man stand up, but he could not. Detective S. IH. McGuffie said that he saw Draper strike Walsh. When asked why he struck him, Draper replied, “I struck him, and that’s all about it.” At the city watchhouse witness (sic) said to Draper, “I think that man will die.” Draper answered, “I hope not. He is a pal of mine.” Next morning witness said to him, “At half-past 2 o’clock this morning Walsh died from injuries received as a result of the blow you struck him.” Draper put his hands to his face and swooned. He began to sob, and said, “He was my best pal.” The coroner said that drunkenness was no excuse for Draper’s action. It might be a mitigation. It was one of those things upon which the law looked very seriously. Bail was fixed in one surety of £100.

 

ON THIS DAY – April 19, 1914

MELBOURNE

MOTORIST KILLS A TELEGRAPHIST BUT ESCAPES MANSLAUGHTER

The trial of Betro Callil, warehouse man, on the charge of manslaughter of Rose Despard, telegraphist, was concluded in the Criminal Court to-day. On April 19, deceased was knocked down and fatally injured by a motor car driven by Callil at the intersection of Swanston and Flinders streets. The defence was that the car was travelling at about 10 to 12 miles per hour, and that defendant could not avoid the collision. After the evidence for the prosecution was given, Mr. Justice Hodges said he was unable to see any evidence of negligence, and the jury, by direction, returned a verdict of ”Not guilty.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – March 31, 1918

MELBOURNE

At an inquiry regarding the death of Albert Greaves (28) in the Melbourne Hospital on March 31 as the result of injuries to his head, the Coroner committed James Gibson for trial on a charge of manslaughter. It is alleged that in the course of an altercation in Swanston-street Gibson struck Greaves. Police constables gave evidence to the effect that Gibson resisted violently when he was arrested.