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ON THIS DAY…… 20th November 1900

Convict George Cairns Bradshaw

George Cairns Bradshaw, a married man, was charged with an unlawful assault upon Jane Bateman at Terang, on 20th October. Mr Garnet appeared to prosecute for the Crown. On being arraigned, the prisoner pleaded guilty and was returned to the cell whilst His Honour perused the Police Court depositions. On being again placed in the dock, the judge remarked that it was a fortunate circumstance for accused that the young woman had been vigorous enough to resist the attempt he had made, otherwise he might have been standing his trial for his life. The written appeal made to him by prisoner stating that the whole affair was the result of drink, was no excuse, and the fact that his wife and two children would be the sufferers of his punishment could not be allowed to weigh with him in awarding his verdict. It was as a deterrent to others, not as vengeance against accused. that he was compelled to severely deal with him. He ordered was ordered on this day in 1900 to five years’ imprisonment in the Geelong gaol, the last month but one of the sentence to be spent in solitary confinement.

ON THIS DAY…… 2nd September 1890

The inquest touching the death of Donald M’Donald was resumed, Mr.W.W.Greene, P.M. Dr. Quick appeared for the Crown, the prisoner Rowe being unrepresented. Although a mass of evidence was elicited during the enquiry, no point of importance transpired. The man John M’Donald, a former partner of the deceased, was re-examined, but his evidence was chiefly corroborative. He swore positively that the last time he saw the deceased was on the occasion when he went to his camp to arrange about the settlement of accounts in connection with some fish they had jointly sent to Melbourne. He was afraid to approach too close to the deceased, as he considered him a “shingle short,” and had, moreover, often heard him threaten to shoot persons on whom he had a down. Senior-constable Egglestone and Detective-sergeant Mahony corroborated the prisoner Rowe’s statement as to his route from Tyntyndyer to Terang. Although some of the camp sites are now submerged by the flood waters, they had been able to follow up his track. They produced the barrel of the prisoner’s gun, and also some burnt cartridges, which were found in the place described by Rowe. The police having exhausted all the available evidence, the enquiry was adjourned till Saturday, October 4th. The prisoner stated that he hoped to see the right man brought to task and that he would say nothing until all witnesses were excluded from the court during the hearing of evidence.

On this day …….. 27th of December 1921

At the Terang Court Robert James Sefton a cyclist, was charged with having on December 27 thrown a missile to the danger of persons. Evidence was given that on Boxing Day Sefton was a competitor at the Terang Friendly Societies’ sports. He was riding in the first heat of the three mile bicycle race, but fell. When he got up he stood beside the track till the other riders came round again and then he threw his bicycle in front of them, bringing three of them down. When questioned by the police, he said he just did his block’ and in reply to an official of the club he said, Deferring to another rider, ‘He brought me down and I ‘did my block.’ ‘ He was find £2.

 

ON THIS DAY…… 20th November 1900

Convict George Cairns Bradshaw

George Cairns Bradshaw, a married man, was charged with an unlawful assault upon Jane Bateman at Terang, on 20th October. Mr Garnet appeared to prosecute for the Crown. On being arraigned, the prisoner pleaded guilty and was returned to the cell whilst His Honour perused the Police Court depositions. On being again placed in the dock, the judge remarked that it was a fortunate circumstance for accused that the young woman had been vigorous enough to resist the attempt he had made, otherwise he might have been standing his trial for his life. The written appeal made to him by prisoner stating that the whole affair was the result of drink, was no excuse, and the fact that his wife and two children would be the sufferers of his punishment could not be allowed to weigh with him in awarding his verdict. It was as a deterrent to others, not as vengeance against accused. that he was compelled to severely deal with him. He ordered was ordered on this day in 1900 to five years’ imprisonment in the Geelong gaol, the last month but one of the sentence to be spent in solitary confinement.

ON THIS DAY…… 2nd September 1890

The inquest touching the death of Donald M’Donald was resumed, Mr.W.W.Greene, P.M. Dr. Quick appeared for the Crown, the prisoner Rowe being unrepresented. Although a mass of evidence was elicited during the enquiry, no point of importance transpired. The man John M’Donald, a former partner of the deceased, was re-examined, but his evidence was chiefly corroborative. He swore positively that the last time he saw the deceased was on the occasion when he went to his camp to arrange about the settlement of accounts in connection with some fish they had jointly sent to Melbourne. He was afraid to approach too close to the deceased, as he considered him a “shingle short,” and had, moreover, often heard him threaten to shoot persons on whom he had a down. Senior-constable Egglestone and Detective-sergeant Mahony corroborated the prisoner Rowe’s statement as to his route from Tyntyndyer to Terang. Although some of the camp sites are now submerged by the flood waters, they had been able to follow up his track. They produced the barrel of the prisoner’s gun, and also some burnt cartridges, which were found in the place described by Rowe. The police having exhausted all the available evidence, the enquiry was adjourned till Saturday, October 4th. The prisoner stated that he hoped to see the right man brought to task and that he would say nothing until all witnesses were excluded from the court during the hearing of evidence.

On this day …….. 27th of December 1921

At the Terang Court Robert James Sefton a cyclist, was charged with having on December 27 thrown a missile to the danger of persons. Evidence was given that on Boxing Day Sefton was a competitor at the Terang Friendly Societies’ sports. He was riding in the first heat of the three mile bicycle race, but fell. When he got up he stood beside the track till the other riders came round again and then he threw his bicycle in front of them, bringing three of them down. When questioned by the police, he said he just did his block’ and in reply to an official of the club he said, Deferring to another rider, ‘He brought me down and I ‘did my block.’ ‘ He was find £2.